COVID-19 Resources and News Mentions

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. Elias Aboujaoude on Technology Behaviors

Technology has been a lifeline during the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s given many the ability to work and learn from home, continue to get medical care, and share face-to-face time with family and friends despite physical distancing and stay-at-home orders…not to mention shopping, and a constant flow of information. While these have been enriching and, in some cases, life-saving aspects to our heightened connectivity during the pandemic, potentially problematic relationships with technology have also been brought into stark relief. Our expert on these matters when it comes to mental health is Dr. Elias Aboujaoude, Clinical Professor, Chief of the Anxiety Disorders Section, and Director of the OCD Clinic and the Impulse Control Disorders Clinic. One of his specialties is the intersection of technology and psychology.

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. Anna Lembke on Addiction

We’re seeing some signs that substance abuse and addiction is on the rise because of the stressors brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Anna Lembke, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Medical Director of Addiction Medicine, is a national leader in the move to “bring addiction into the house of medicine” so it can be treated like any other disease. As Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic, Dr. Lembke is uniquely experienced to discuss this social consequence of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. Kim Bullock on Therapy via Virtual Reality

With person-to-person gatherings suspended because of the Coronavirus pandemic, technology has become the lifeline for friends, family, businesses, and care providers. But even before telehealth was in the spotlight, some health professionals were utilizing the unique characteristics of Virtual Reality (VR) to deliver, and enhance, treatments. Dr. Kim Bullock, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, is one of those pioneering doctors who embraced VR early on. In this Q&A, she elaborates on how it can offer particular relief for those suffering under the stress of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. James Lock on Eating Disorders

Mental health conditions can be exacerbated because of the additional pressures brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic. In this COVID-19 Q&A with Dr. Lock, a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Stanford Child and Adolescent Eating Disorder Program, we focus on how eating disorders may be further triggered by the conditions imposed by COVID-19 safety measures.

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. Margo Thienemann on OCD

The prolonged uncertainty brought on by the Coronavirus pandemic has heightened the challenge of maintaining mental wellbeing, particularly for some with conditions that manifest in controlling outcomes, like Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, or OCD. As part of our COVID-19 Q&A series, Dr. Margo Thienemann, Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Director of Psychiatric Services at the Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) Clinic, shares how COVID-19 is impacting patients and ways to cope.

COVID-19 Q&A: Dr. Rachel Manber on Sleep Disturbances

Stay-at-home orders have our daily routines in flux, and uncertainty and fear are constant companions in this global pandemic. As part of our COVID-19 Q&A series, Rachel Manber, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Stanford Sleep Health and Insomnia Program (SHIP), discusses how these conditions can interfere with healthy sleep or exacerbate existing sleep condition, as well as ways to get help.

Scholarly Articles

  1. Cognitive Processing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder via Telehealth: Practical Considerations During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Moring JC, Dondanville KA, Fina BA, Hassija C, Chard K, Monson C, LoSavio ST, Wells SY, Morland LA, Kaysen D, Galovski TE, Resick PA. J Trauma Stress. 2020 May 13. doi: 10.1002/jts.22544.

  2. The impact of COVID-19 on mental health: The interactive roles of brain biotypes and human connection. Hagerty SL, Williams LM. Brain Behav Immun Health. 2020 May 7:100078. doi: 10.1016/j.bbih.2020.100078.PMID: 32382727

  3. Increased Risk of Suicide Due to Economic and Social Impacts of Social Distancing Measures to Address the Covid-19 Pandemic: A Forecast. Weems C, Carrion V, McCurdy B, Scozzafava M. (2020). 10.13140/RG.2.2.21601.45926.

  4. Chatbots in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. Miner AS, Laranjo L, Kocaballi AB. NPJ Digit Med. 2020 May 4;3:65. doi: 10.1038/s41746-020-0280-0. eCollection 2020. PMID: 32377576

  5. Understanding and Addressing Sources of Anxiety Among Health Care Professionals During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Shanafelt T, Ripp J, Trockel M. JAMA. 2020 Apr 7. doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.5893. PMID: 32259193

  6. Mitigating and learning from the impact of COVID-19 infection on addictive disorders. Marsden J, Darke S, Hall W, Hickman M, Holmes J, Humphreys K, Neale J, Tucker J, West R. Addiction. 2020 Apr 6. doi: 10.1111/add.15080. PMID: 32250482

News Mentions

  • – PBS NewsHour

    Why COVID-19 can be 'toxic' for people in alcohol recovery

    For millions of people in recovery or looking for help for alcohol use, in-person group meetings can be a source of relief. But social distancing measures that were put in place to help curb the coronavirus have disrupted the support networks people rely upon for help. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • – Washington Post

    In defense of souvenirs: For travel-lovers stuck at home, even the unlikeliest tchotchkes can spark joy

    Social media posts are fleeting, and photos get lost in the cloud. Mementos are tangible links to the adventurous past and distractions from the unmoving present. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article that discusses factors that tie into hoarding disorder.

  • – The Stanford Daily

    New Stanford survey seeks effects of COVID-19 on family caregivers | The Stanford Daily

    Stanford researchers have launched a survey to document the impact of coronavirus on family caregivers and shed light on the experiences of parents, guardians and older siblings whose responsibilities have increased in the past few weeks. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, created the survey to collect the stories and perspectives of individuals in the Stanford community and beyond.

  • – What to Do When Social Distancing Meets Social Anxiety

    What to Do When Social Distancing Meets Social Anxiety

    Tali Ball, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Aliza Goldberg, doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium, provide tips on how to stay engaged with meaningful social activities, even when you feel anxious - in this recent post featured by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.

  • – The Daily Beast

    Where Do You Go if You Can’t Go Home?

    A lot of people are dreaming right now of escaping to the mountains or by the lake, but for some that may be their only option. In this piece, Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the health benefits from staying home and of companionship with a partner.

  • – Vogue

    The Simplest Ways to Strengthen Your Immunity in the Time of COVID-19

    From reducing stress to getting better sleep, here are the best ways to strengthen your immune system. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor, is quoted.

  • – Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    Helping Kids and Families Cope with COVID-19 - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

    In this piece, Victor Carrion, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares his advice with Stanford Children’s Health about how families can prepare their children for the continued news coverage and conversations around COVID-19.

  • – Scope

    Feeling anxious about the coronavirus? A Stanford psychiatrist offers tips - Scope

    As news of COVID-19 continues to dominate headlines, David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor in Medicine and medical director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, offers tips on handling the day-to-day disruptions to our lives.

  • – HuffPost

    The Most Important Skill Kids Can Develop Right Now

    Experts share advice on how parents can help their kids learn how to bounce back during the coronavirus pandemic in this HuffPost piece. Victor Carrion, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • – TheHill

    Metabolism, Immunity, and Mental Health: A Critical Dialogue in the Era of COVID-19

    Changing lifestyle habits can improve well-being tremendously, and even on a budget, we can consume the right foods and make better choices. Shebani Sethi Dalai, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides details in this opinion piece. *author does not endorse photo or headline chosen by newspaper

  • – WSJ

    For Cooped-Up Families, Food Becomes Something to Fight Over

    As grocery shopping goes from an everyday chore to an often frantic and frustrating endeavor, family squabbles about food—planning for it, preparing it and eating it—are emerging. Douglas Rait, chief of the Couples and Family Therapy Clinic and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • – New York Post

    Coronavirus battle is ‘recipe’ for disaster for health care workers: experts

    Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article focusing on mental health issues among coronavirus healthcare workers.

  • – Time

    A Dramatically Different Ramadan For U.S. Muslims Amid Coronavirus Lockdowns

    A Dramatically Different Ramadan For U.S. Muslims Amid Coronavirus Lockdowns Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Muslim Mental Health Lab, discusses the unique impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on Ramadan.

  • – Scope

    How a psychologist aids health technology innovation

    Douglas Rait, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, helps groups of Stanford Biodesign Innovation fellows hone their ability to work as a team, fueling their projects.

  • – ELLE

    How to Take Care of Your Mental Health During the COVID-19 Crisis

    The coronavirus pandemic has become an unprecedented event in history. It has strained the communities and businesses we love, not to mention the people that fill them. Recently, the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that 45 percent of adults say the worry and stress of COVID-19 has negatively impacted their mental health. And as the effects of the crisis continue to play out, there may be heightened moments of loneliness and fear. But even homebound, it’s still possible—and essential—to take care of your mental health, no matter your budget or situation. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • – The Stanford Daily

    Stanford researchers tackle COVID-19 from all angles | The Stanford Daily

    Researchers like Pablo Paredes, an instructor in radiology and psychiatry and behavioral services, are working on solutions to alleviate the added stress for many people who are now being asked to work from home while balancing family life.

  • – How a College Final Became a Lesson in Survival

    How a College Final Became a Lesson in Survival

    In this essay, Daniel Mason, novelist and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes how he turned his students’ last assignment into an exercise for staying well.

  • – Wired

    How to Entertain Your Young Children During a Quarantine

    In many places, schools and day cares are closed. Here are some tips on how to entertain your little ones, and on how to talk to them about Covid-19. Victor Carrion, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • – KCBS 740AM | 106.9 FM

    Doctors Stress Need For 'Self-Care' Amid Shelter In Place

    The statewide shelter in place order to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus is continuing into its second month, and the drastic change can take an emotional toll. Californians are finding news ways to manage stress and take care of themselves during the pandemic. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this podcast.

  • – CNN

    Distress in seniors surges amid coronavirus pandemic

    American seniors are struggling with a growing sense of isolation, distress and depression amid the coronavirus pandemic. The guidance for the elderly to remain sheltered in place as society slowly reopens is a burden that's becoming hard to take. Erin Cassidy-Eagle, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • – Wisconsin Public Radio

    Listen: The Psychology Of Public Health Policy Compliance In America

    Public health professionals say that the coronavirus’ spread can be controlled through testing, isolating, contact tracing and quarantining. In this podcast, WPR explores why the country’s mindset stands in the way of this strategy, and what the end of COVID-19 might more realistically look like. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed as a guest.

  • – Salaam Gateway - Global Islamic Economy Gateway

    Muslim mental wellness: Retain core religious values to get through Ramadan in lockdown, say health professionals | Salaam Gateway - Global Islamic Economy Gateway

    A week before Ramadan, the Khalil Center held an online Muslim mental wellness summit in cooperation with Stanford University’s Muslims & Mental Health lab. Such events usually attract a few hundred attendees, but thousands flocked to this online summit. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • – Thrive Global

    How We React to Coronavirus Stress Depends on Our Biotype, Finds Stanford Medicine Research

    COVID-19 has had major impacts on the economy, the way we live our daily lives, and our mental health. The research on mental health during COVID-19 has mostly focused on frontline healthcare workers, with good reason, but all of us are experiencing some level of increased stress right now. Leanne Williams, founder of the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness (PMHW) and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and her lab have focused their work on what happens in times of extreme negative stress, such as the current situation. Learn more in this article from Leanne Williams, Laura Hack, and Lauren Whicker.

  • – Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    How to Help Kids with Distance Learning During COVID-19

    Since schools closed in March due to COVID-19, many families have struggled to help their children adjust to distance learning. Grace Gengoux, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • – Scope

    "Your health is paramount": The mental health of health care workers during COVID-19 - Scope

    In a recent webinar, Stanford mental health experts offered tips for handling the unique stressors faced by health care workers treating patients during the coronavirus pandemic. Mickey Trockel, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Cheryl Gore-Felton, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted in this post.

  • – Arianna Huffington

    Arianna Huffington: The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Accelerating Our Mental Health Crisis

    Developed in partnership with Stanford Medicine, Thriving Mind shares tools that can help manage coronavirus anxiety, build human connection in a time of isolation, eat well and move, even when we’re unable to leave our home. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned in this article.

  • – News Center

    To support health care workers battling COVID-19, start fresh and think holistically, experts say

    Experts on physician wellness collaborated on a framework that health care leaders can use to support workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Tait Shanafelt, the Jeanie and Stew Ritchie Professor, chief wellness officer at Stanford Medicine, and director of the WellMD Center, and Mickey Trockel, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are co-authors of the study.

  • – The Stanford Daily

    Reevaluate your nutrition strategy amid COVID-19, doctors say | The Stanford Daily

    Shebani Sethi Dalai, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed here by The Daily about metabolic psychiatry - which focuses on treatment of metabolic dysfunction and investigates the influences of nutrition, inflammation and insulin resistance on psychiatric outcomes.

  • – from the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing

    Constructively Communicating with Children About COVID-19

    The Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing wants to highlight resources for families to have constructive conversations about COVID-19.

  • – Architectural Digest

    5 Easy Steps You Can Take at Home to Reduce Anxiety

    With the rampant spread of the coronavirus, upending of routines, and general uncertainty about when we’ll return to normal, it can be hard not to feel anxious. In thinking about all of this, know that you’re not alone, it is completely okay to feel anxious at this unprecedented time. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor, and colleagues from the Brainstorm Lab, discuss steps you can take to lower your stress levels.

  • – The Mercury News

    Opinion: Staying connected is crucial for our mental health

    In this opinion piece, Victor Carrion, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares how we can ward off coronavirus fears, anxiety, anger and feelings of frustration during the current coronavirus pandemic.

  • – Motherly

    It’s science: This is why you’re having trouble concentrating right now

    Sundari Chetty, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article that discusses how the brain has a natural ability to recover from stress.

  • – The Stanford Daily

    Students discuss eating disorders amid COVID-19 pandemic | The Stanford Daily

    As COVID-19 upends students’ college experiences, some students with eating disorders are suffering from heightened triggers. Kristine Luce, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • – KRON4

    COVID-19 taking toll on medical workers mental health

    Working on the front lines of COVID-19 can harm the mental health of health care workers. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor in Medicine and medical director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted in this article.