News from the Department

Latest Stories & News Mentions

  • EverydayHealth.com

    6 Tips for Drinking Responsibly During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    First assess whether your drinking habit is healthy. Then follow these steps to help make sure your relationship with alcohol stays that way. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • Scientific American

    The Disturbing History of Research into Transgender Identity

    This piece, written by Jack Turban, a fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how research into the determinants of gender identity may do more harm than good.

  • Cosmopolitan

    How to Manage Election Stress, According to Experts Who Know Exactly How Tough It Is

    Therapists and educators explain how to manage your mental health during the 2020 election and final presidential debate. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • FRONTLINE

    As Purdue Pharma Agrees to Settle with the DOJ, Revisit Its Role in the Opioid Crisis

    Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, has reached a settlement with the Department of Justice. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • Good Morning America

    Why this high school teacher lets his students sleep in class

    This story discusses a Minnesota teacher who allows students to sleep during class, as part of a unique sleep study lesson. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment here.

  • Rewire

    Dealing with Reemergence Anxiety? Here's What to Know.

    Expert advice and tips for dealing with COVID anxiety and safely navigating life in the “new normal” during the coronavirus pandemic. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Newsweek

    Gen Z is the most stressed out group in America, poll finds

    Americans aged between 18 to 23, also known as adult Gen Z, are reporting the highest stress levels of any generation in the country, according to a poll. Jennifer Douglas, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this story.

  • Scope

    How brain-wave data can refine psychiatric treatment choices - Scope

    Brain-wave data identifies two psychiatric subtypes and can predict best treatments for PTSD and depression, Stanford research shows. Amit Etkin, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this post.

  • AJP Residents' Journal Podcast

    Theatrical Vignettes Addressing Parent-Child Conflict

    Bharat Sampathi interviews Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on her initiative Stanford CHIPAO (Communication Health Interactive for Parents of Adolescents and Others) - they discuss the theatrical vignettes addressing parent-child conflict, mental health in immigrant families, and cultural psychiatry.

  • Scope

    Circadian rhythms affect Olympic swim performance, study finds

    Olympic swimmers race about 0.39 seconds faster in the evening than in the morning, and as insignificant as that fraction of a second may seem, gold medals are routinely won by slimmer margins. Renske Lok, postdoctoral research fellow of psychiatry, is mentioned in this article.

  • SFChronicle.com

    At least 10 times a day, someone on the brink of death from a drug overdose is saved in S.F.

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article discussing potential solutions to curbing the opioid crisis.

  • The Social Dilemma

    The Social Dilemma - the film

    We tweet, we like, and we share - but what are the consequences of our growing dependence on social media? Discover what's hiding on the other side of your screen from the documentary "The Social Dilemma." Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in the film.

  • Public Goods Blog

    How to Deal With Your Mental Health After a Layoff

    Losing a job is always stressful, especially if it is unexpected. Here are 6 tips on how to cope and manage your mental health. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this post.

  • HuffPost

    5 Sneaky Signs Your Election Anxiety Is Coming Out

    Here are subtle ways that (valid) stress over politics may be messing with your mental health, plus advice on how to deal. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Brain organoids reveal neuronal flaws in syndrome tied to autism

    Neurons derived from people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome show deficits in calcium signaling and electrical activity, pointing to possible therapeutic targets. New findings uncover factors that may contribute to the development of psychiatric conditions associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. They could also help researchers identify new therapeutic targets - Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • the Guardian

    Why professionals, depressed and anxious, are developing addictions during Covid

    The pandemic is making the US drug epidemic even worse – and many of its victims include white-collar professionals. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Forbes

    8 Things Mental Health Experts Want You To Know On World Mental Health Day

    In honor of World Mental Health Day on October 10th, these are the 8 things mental health experts want you to know right now about mental health. Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and associate dean of academic affairs, and Jack Turban, fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, are quoted in this article - written by residency alumni Jessica Gold.

  • HeraldScotland

    Issue of the day: The pandemic fuels 'doomscrolling'

    In a year such as this, it is perhaps no surprise that ‘doomscrolling’ is on the rise. Now mental health experts are warning of the dangers of the habit for mental and emotional well-being. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • them.

    Trans Athletes Just Want to Play. Rugby Is Trying to Force Them Out

    New proposed regulations would require trans women to play with cisgender men on the rugby pitch. Athletes, scientists, and LGBTQ+ advocates are speaking out in protest. Jack Turban, a fellow in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • SFChronicle.com

    'This is a public health crisis': New push to allow safe drug use sites in S.F. and Oakland

    This article discusses how State Sen. Scott Wiener said Thursday he plans to reintroduce controversial legislation next year that would allow for safe drug-use sites in San Francisco and Oakland. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Newsweek

    How to cope with election anxiety, according to the American Psychological Association

    The American Psychological Association has released tips for how to manage anxiety caused by the 2020 election, after a survey revealed the upcoming vote is a significant source of stress in the lives of most people in the country. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Jennifer Douglas, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted in this article.

  • NY Times

    Pointers From Portugal on Addiction and the Drug War

    Decriminalizing the use of illicit drugs involves trade-offs, but treating addiction as a disease yields a clear gain, research suggests. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Nighttime light affects sleep, repetitive behaviors in autism mouse model

    Recent research findings suggest alterations in the autism gene CNTNAP2 might relate to a vulnerability to sleep disturbances. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the studies mentioned.

  • HuffPost

    15 Things Therapists Do When They're Anxious Watching The Debates

    Here are mental health experts' tips for addressing anxiety and practicing self-care during election season. Jack Turban, fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and residency alumni Jessica Gold, provide comment.

  • Vox

    9 questions about trans issues you were too embarrassed to ask

    From pronouns to sports to puberty blockers, here are answers to the most common questions about trans issues. Jack Turban, a fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine, provides comment.

  • CNBC

    Dr. Fauci says we should prepare to 'hunker down' again — here's how to mentally get through fall and winter

    Covid-19 isn't going to go away in the fall and winter. In fact, White House advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said that Americans should prepare to "hunker down." Here are some tangible ways you can stay positive while stuck at home again. Rachel Manber, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Teen Vogue

    What to Do If You're Having Suicidal Thoughts

    This article offers guidance for teens and adolescents who may be having suicidal thoughts. Stephanie Clarke, clinical instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.

  • Cambia Health Solutions: HealthChangers Podcast

    A Mini-Series on The New Reality of Caregiving During the Pandemic

    Until recently there were 44 million caregivers in the United States. Now in the midst of a global pandemic, we are all caregivers. Caregivers include medical teams, grocery workers, truck drivers, and others working to find balance, trying to perform at work while all at the same time, not jeopardizing the care provided to their loved ones. For this special episode of HealthChangers we hear a personal story from Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Wired

    During Covid, Eating Disorder Patients Turn to Apps

    Anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating patients are facing novel challenges as in-person care is on hold. Can tech tools fill in the treatment gaps? Cara Bohon, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Scope

    Body image: 'We can have a full, meaningful life in the bodies we have.'

    Body image is a key part of well-being, yet many of us have a conflicted relationship with our bodies. Kristine Luce, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, offers guidance.

  • News Center

    Stanford scientists solve secret of nerve cells marking a form of schizophrenia

    A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why. Sergiu Pasca, the Bonnie Uytengsu and Family Director of the Stanford Brain Organogenesis Program and an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author.

  • The Beet.

    The 6 Best Foods to Eat to Alleviate PCOS Symptoms

    Here are six foods to eat that can help alleviate symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), from an expert. Shebani Sethi Dalai, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Engineering's The Future of Everything Podcast

    How to get a good night’s sleep

    COVID-19 is changing how many scientists, like Stanford sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, view their field. Listen in as Dr. Pelayo talks sleep on this episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything podcast.

  • Stanford School of Engineering

    Andrew Huberman: How stress affects the mind — and how to relieve it

    In a segment on The Future of Everything, Andrew Huberman, associate professor of neurobiology and of ophthalmology, discussed the science of stress and ways to manage it. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host. The work of David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health, and medical director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford, was also highlighted here.

  • The LowDOWN, Episode 2

    Sweet Dreams: Down Syndrome and Sleep

    On Season 2, Episode 3 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, gives us the lowdown on sleep issues for people with Down syndrome.

  • The Independent

    Beaming lights into the brain can recreate the feeling of ketamine, and scientists have already done it

    Stanford scientists have identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author of the study, and is quoted in this article.

  • Forbes

    MTV Showcases The Realities Of Teen Opioid Addiction In 16 And Recovering

    A new docuseries aims to showcase the realities of teen addiction, but also the hope of recovery. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this piece.

  • Healthline

    Why Poor Sleep Can Lead to Weight Gain

    This piece highlights a recent study that found not getting enough sleep or having inconsistent sleeping patterns is associated with a higher body mass index. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Big Think

    What causes mysterious dissociation experiences? Scientists now have an answer.

    Stanford scientists have identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. Senior author Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • Because Health

    How psychological stress impacts immunity and what you can do to cope with stress

    The prolonged coronavirus pandemic is proving increasingly stressful for most of us. During these challenging times, here are some ways to reduce your emotional stress. Shebani Sethi Dalai, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Gizmodo

    Trauma Disrupts Children's Brains—but Researchers Are Finding New Ways to Help Them Heal

    According to a recent review of studies about early life adversity and development published in Psychological Bulletin, the wear and tear of threatening experiences might also lead to early puberty, faster cellular aging, and accelerated thinning of a prefrontal cortex area important for decision-making and social and emotional regulation. The damage of trauma extends well beyond the brain. Victor Carrion, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses cue-centered treatment as a way to address trauma.

  • InStyle

    Therapists Say 'Election Stress' Is Real — and It’s Only Going to Get Worse

    Written by residency alumni Jessica Gold, this InStyle article focuses on election stress. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Stanford Daily

    New Stanford Medicine depression treatment has 90% success rate, study finds

    A small study showing that a new treatment designed by Stanford professors for severe depression has a 90% success rate was published in early April. Brandon Bentzley, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured in this article.

  • Washington Post

    How to tame your temper when pandemic parenting stress has you boiling

    Parents are stressed to the max and there’s no end in sight. That resilience many had in March and April has transformed into fatigue and frustration - Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • NPR.org

    Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

    Stanford scientists have identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. Senior author Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was interviewed during this segment.

  • Native News Online

    California’s First Suicide Prevention Office To Focus on Native Youth

    New state legislation in California targeting suicide prevention could stand to benefit communities like Humboldt County, where the suicide rate among Native youth is three times higher than the state average. Dr. Virgil Moorehead Jr., executive director of Behavioral Health Services at TF-NAFS and a member of the Big Lagoon Rancheria (Yurok, Tolowa Dee-ni’) described TF-NAFS as striving to provide more intensive, cultural-based service access to the kids and families who have not been consistently reached by other providers in the county. Between Sept. 15-18, Moorehead will co-emcee the 2nd Annual Native Youth Mental Health and Wellness Conference with Yahmonee Hedrick. The virtual suicide prevention program is sponsored by California Indian Health Services and the conference, hosted with the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, will include youth-driven, youth-focused information for program administrators and providers.

  • News Center

    Stanford team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences

    Stanford scientists have identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author of the study.

  • Moms

    How Kids Feel Lonelier More Than Ever With Digital Interactions

    Social media has endless interaction possibilities; however, it can lower a child’s tolerance for solitude. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article about social media.

  • Good Housekeeping

    Using Two Separate Duvets Could Save Your Relationship, According to Sleep Doctors

    Before you get a sleep divorce and stop sharing a bed altogether, think about the role your bedding plays in your sleeplessness. Rafael Pelayo, sleep specialist and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on sleep preferences in this article.

  • Explica

    The neurons responsible for stress-related insomnia

    Although stress triggers a series of responses that allow the body to cope with acute and difficult situations, it is also responsible for long nights of wakefulness. Now, a study, published in the journal Science Advances, identifies a neural circuit whose activity not only alters night rest, but also the immune system, in stressful situations. The study, led by Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is covered in this article.

  • Scope

    AI researchers explore solutions for real-life health challenges

    A device to prevent falls and another to better diagnosis people with developmental disorders are among the AI projects funded under a new grant program at Stanford. Dennis Wall, an autism expert and associate professor of pediatrics, psychiatry, and biomedical data sciences, is one of the researchers who recently received funding through the new Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Hoffman-Yee Research Grant Program.

  • SELF

    17 Totally Normal Feelings to Have as a College Student Right Now

    Written by residency alumni Jessica Gold, this Self article focuses on back-to-school season and how the pandemic is wreaking havoc on the typical college experience of students across the country. Jack Turban, fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, provides comment.

  • Qrius

    COVID-19 and your brain: 6 ways to control the damage to your mental health

    COVID-19 has touched each of us somehow. Gaining understanding of our brain responses offers a window into how mental health symptoms arise, and allows us to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic on mental health. The Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness (PMHW), is looking at cutting-edge techniques to understand how brain circuits make us who we are – and what happens when they go awry. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • Vet Candy

    Therapy access eating disorders therapy via phone app

    In a study involving nearly 700 women on 27 U.S. college campuses, including Washington University in St. Louis, the researchers determined that a phone-based app that delivers a form of cognitive behavioral therapy was an effective means of intervention in addressing eating disorders. C. Barr Taylor, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, co-directed the study with colleagues at Washington University School of Medicine.

  • SELF

    We’re Basically All Struggling With Mental Health Right Now—Let’s Normalize It

    Written by residency alumni Jessica Gold, this Self article focuses on normalizing struggles with mental health, asking for help, and getting treatment when needed. Jack Turban, child and adolescent psychiatry fellow, provides comment.

  • PRWeb

    Special Forces Veterans Find Hope in Psychedelic Therapy for Treating PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury

    To gather more evidence about ibogaine as a potential PTSD and TBI treatment option, non-profit "VETS" is supporting an upcoming observational and brain imaging study of the safety of ibogaine-assisted therapy in veterans with head trauma, combat, or blast exposure, led by Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Countering the mental distress of COVID-19 by building resilience

    Amid continued uncertainty about when the COVID-19 pandemic will be brought under control, Stanford mental health experts are planning for the psychological fallout of having an entire population under prolonged stress. Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, MD, Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program; Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; and Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured in this story.

  • SFChronicle.com

    We need workers to stay home when they're ill. It's going to take universal sick leave

    This piece discusses American workers' tendency to go to work while sick, and how breaking this habit will require a cultural and policy shift. David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health, is quoted here.

  • Washington Post

    Stop springing forward, say sleep experts pushing standard over daylight saving time

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has called for the elimination of daylight saving time, in which clocks are moved an hour forward in the spring and returned back an hour in the winter. The twice-a-year transition, they argue, not only inconveniences everyone but also increases the risk of various health problems and motor vehicle accidents. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this story.

  • Vox

    Elon Musk is one step closer to connecting a computer to your brain

    A neuroscience startup by Elon Musk has demonstrated a prototype of its brain-machine interface that currently works in pigs. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Maheen Adamson, clinical associate professor of neurosurgery, provide comment in this article.

  • Big Think

    ​Most of us carry a mother's voice in the neural patterns of our brain

    Mom’s voice causes a strong response in the brains of typically developing children, a Stanford study has demonstrated. The work of Daniel Abrams, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is highlighted in this piece.

  • SFChronicle.com

    Bay Area life is incredibly stressful right now: Seven easy strategies to help you cope

    David Spiegel, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Center for Integrative Medicine, is quoted in this article on coping strategies, particularly for those who live in the Bay Area and dealing with the pandemic and wildfires.

  • Scientific American

    COVID-19-Era Isolation Is Making Dangerous Eating Disorders Worse

    People with anorexia, bulimia or binge-eating disorder report suffering relapses related to the stress of staying at home. Sarah Adler, clinical assistant professor, provides comment on the stress and anxiety associated with decisions about food and availability of food in this Scientific American article.

  • Time

    Artificial Intelligence Is Here To Calm Your Road Rage

    Companies are working on algorithms to transform the driving experience, not by controlling the car, but by taking better care of drivers. Pablo Paredes, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences director of the Pervasive Wellbeing Technology Lab, is featured in this Time article.

  • SoundCloud - KCSB

    The Mental Health Crisis of the Pandemic

    Youth are at greater risk for mental health issues during the coronavirus pandemic. KCSB’s Robert Stark speaks with Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Rachel Velcoff Hults, equity and access attorney at the national center for youth law, also at Stanford, about the social and environmental impact of this mental health crisis.