News from the Department

Latest Stories & News Mentions

  • Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

    Deeda Blair Research Initiative for Disorders of the Brain Names 2023 Research Initiative Awardees

    The Deeda Blair Research Initiative, administered by the FNIH, has announced its 2023 Awardees. Congratulations to Neal Amin, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, a 2023 award recipient, selected for his project to develop a molecular differentiation atlas of the human brain with 3D stem cell models to investigate neurons implicated in psychiatric disorders!

  • The Atlantic

    The Hidden Link Between Workaholism and Mental Health

    Long hours on the job can temporarily ease the symptoms of depression and anxiety. But you’re better off leaving the office and facing your feelings head-on. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    How to take in traumatic news events and preserve your mental health

    News consumers who want to stay engaged and aware of current events can find it difficult to process traumatic news stories in way that best protects their mental health. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Looking for love in all the wrong hormones

    Researchers have found that oxytocin, commonly known as the "love hormone" may not be crucial for the social behaviors it's known for. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, and by courtesy of obstetrics and gynecology, is featured.

  • STAT

    Predictive biomarkers could ease the exhaustive trial-and-error of antidepressants

    If researchers can successfully use biomarkers to predict which antidepressants will work best for people, it could be a major step toward much-needed clinical action for patients. Leanne Williams, the Vincent V.C. Woo professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and, by courtesy, of psychology, is quoted on the subject in this article.

  • Institute for Global Change

    From Outer Space to the Human Cell: The Moonshots That Could Save Humanity

    Each year the Moonshots series highlights new frontiers where breakthroughs in science and technology are being used to solve some of the biggest problems of our time. The Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, led by Leanne Williams, the Vincent V.C. Woo Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Ruth O’Hara, the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and senior associate dean for research in the School of Medicine, is featured.

  • Washington Post

    Is the age of unplugging on planes over?

    When you board a flight, you enter a bubble free from the expectations of ever-present WiFi, email and conference calls. But for how much longer? Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Nature Briefing

    CRISPR voles can’t detect ‘love hormone’ oxytocin — but still mate for life

    The humble prairie vole has long been revered for its unusual commitment to family. Pair-bonded couples huddle together, raise pups together and mate exclusively together — at least most of the time. Drop another couple’s pups into a cage with pair-bonded prairie voles and the adults will often foster those young as their own — highly unusual behaviour for a rodent. But a study published on 27 January in Neuron1 challenges decades of research that suggests a protein that detects the ‘love hormone’ oxytocin is responsible for the voles’ domestic bliss. Using CRISPR gene-editing, researchers found that prairie voles lacking the protein were still responsible parents and still formed monogamous relationships. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, and by courtesy of obstetrics and gynecology, is co-lead author and provides comment.

  • Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

    A Potential Neural Source of Social Communication Difficulties in Autism Is Identified

    Many children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder have difficulty communicating and establishing social bonds with others. A good deal of brain research seeking to explain why this might be the case has focused on the visual system and the processing of visual signals, as manifested, for example, in the interpretation of facial expressions or the ability to maintain eye contact. Now, a research team that has turned its attention to sounds and the processing of vocal signals has reported its results. Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute | From Our Neurons to Yours Podcast

    Psychedelics and Empathy

    Recently, there's been growing excitement in the scientific community about revisiting the potential medical benefits of psychedelic drugs that have been off limits for decades. Scientists are discovering or rediscovering applications of psilocybin, LSD, MDMA, and other compounds for treating people with depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute has several leading experts paving the way in this field, including the guest featured in this episode, Robert Malenka, Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a Deputy Director of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.

  • KRON4

    How to cope with trauma after a mass shooting

    David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, spoke with KRON4 about how to cope with the impacts of a mass shooting.

  • Stanford HAI

    Stanford HAI Announces Seed Grant and Wu Tsai Neuro Grant Recipients

    Stanford Institute for Human-Centered AI and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute grants support research teams spanning all seven of Stanford’s schools, on themes ranging from healthcare to robotics. Congratulations to the 37 research teams that received a total of $3 million for innovative AI projects, including Anna Lembke (with Co-PI Johannes Eichstaedt) for their project entitled, "Addicted by Design: An Investigation of How AI-fueled Digital Media Platforms Contribute to Addictive Consumption" and Ehsan Adeli and Nolan Williams, (Co PIs, with main PI Jennifer McNab) for their project entitled, "Determining Brain Targets for Neuromodulation Based on External Head Features."

  • CBS5

    How to talk to children about shootings

    Following the tragedies in Half Moon Bay and Monterey Park in Los Angeles County, Hilit Kletter, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides tips on how to talk to your children about gun violence.

  • Half Moon Bay Review

    The 'allcove' will be an open door for youth in need

    In a midtown neighborhood shopping center in Palo Alto, an innovative model for prevention and early intervention for youth mental health challenges is an open door for young people. Called “allcove,” it’s one of several such centers taking shape across California, and the first of its kind in the United States. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing are featured in this article.

  • Cision PR Newswire

    2023 Japan Prize Laureates Announced

    Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has been selected as a co-recipient of the 2023 Japan Prize in the field of Life Science (with Prof. Gero Miesenboeck of Austria). The Japan Prize is awarded to scientists and engineers from around the world, who have made creative and dramatic achievements that help progress their fields and contribute significantly to realizing peace and prosperity for all humanity. Congratulations, Dr. Deisseroth!

  • Stanford Medicine Magazine

    Breast cancer stigmas threaten care for South Asian women

    Myths about breast cancer and a stigma against talking about it keep South Asian women from seeking essential care and community support. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • Stanford Children's Health: Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    How to Talk to Children About Mass Shootings

    Parents may be wondering how to have a conversation with their kids after news of multiple mass shootings. Victor Carrion, the John A. Turner, M.D. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Hilit Kletter, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provide suggestions on how to help children process this tragedy.

  • The Washington Times

    Washington grasps at solutions for America’s fentanyl crisis

    The Drug Enforcement Administration closed out last year with a startling statistic: It seized over 379 million deadly doses of fentanyl in 2022, enough to kill every American, and its haul included twice the number of counterfeit pills that agents seized the prior year. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • University of Washington - Allen School News

    With HAILEY, researchers demonstrate how AI can lend a helping hand for mental health support

    Sometimes it can be hard to find just the right words to help someone who is struggling with mental health challenges. But recent advances in artificial intelligence could soon mean that assistance is just a click away. According to co-author Adam Miner, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, HAILEY is an example of how to leverage AI for mental health support in a safe and human-centered way.

  • BuzzFeed News

    I Faked My Hypnosis During Therapy And Then Lied About It For Years

    During hypnosis for anxiety and relationship trauma, I felt guilty admitting that it wasn’t working, so I faked it. I talked to hypnotherapy experts to find out why that happened, and how the process can — and should! — work. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KQED

    How’s Your Dry January Going?

    After enjoying a few booze-infused holiday weeks last month, many of us are drying out in January, reducing or completely eliminating alcohol from our diets. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences joins this KQED forum to provide comment.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Biden said the pandemic is over, but the pandemic won't cooperate

    The public mood has shifted from fear of COVID to acceptance. That has allowed people to return to their regular lives but has undermined efforts to protect the vulnerable. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Wall Street Journal

    Using Your Phone Before Bed Hijacks Your Sleep, But Not for the Reason You Think

    Much ado has been made about the blue light our devices emit, but the ways in which tech hijacks our sleep go far deeper than that. It’s the content we see that has the biggest impact on our slumber, sleep experts say. Jamie Zeitzer, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Big Brains - Podcast

    Unraveling sleep’s greatest mysteries: The Day Tomorrow Began

    Sleep science has evolved into a multi-disciplinary field — with scientists focusing on diagnosing the causes of sleep disorders, to how sleep affects our metabolic health, and improving methods for good sleep hygiene. But at the core of sleep science, one fundamental question remains: Why do we sleep? Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Stanford HAI

    What DALL-E Reveals About Human Creativity

    The image-generating model has some impressive capabilities that parallel the brain, but is it really creative? Manish Saggar, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the subject along with colleagues doing related work.

  • Parade

    Why the Body Jerks at Random Times

    Here’s what to do if it’s happening to you—especially if it’s getting in the way of a good night’s sleep. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NBC Bay Area

    Rain Sadness: Does It Impact Our Mood, Mental Health?

    It’s been a soggy start to 2023 in the Bay Area. Does this impact our mood and mental health? Raj Mathai speaks with David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on the direct correlation.

  • WDET 101.9 FM

    ‘Digital drugs’ are affecting our physical and emotional health

    Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins Amanda LeClaire, host of CultureShift, to talk about how technology is changing our relationships with others and with the world.

  • KQED

    Researchers Work to Understand Connection Between Autism and Gender Fluidity

    A recent study suggests a strong overlap between autism and gender fluidity as researchers work to understand the connection and explore how society can be more accommodating to people who live at this intersection. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • AOL Lifestyle

    Dreaming About Being Pregnant May Have Nothing To Do With Babies

    Dreams about being pregnant can be symbolic of other thoughts or situations in your life. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NewsNation

    Investment in treatment needed to fight fentanyl crisis

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences joined NewsNation to discuss how fentanyl surpassed other opioids to become the biggest drug problem the country is facing.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Brain wiring explains why autism hinders grasp of vocal emotion, says Stanford Medicine study

    Children with autism have trouble identifying emotional tones because of differences in a brain region that processes social information, a Stanford Medicine study found. Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute - Stanford University

    The rebirth of psychedelic medicine

    Researchers at the the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute are at the forefront of a seismic shift that’s putting a spotlight on once taboo psychedelic substances as a promising new frontier in psychiatric medicine. Robert Malenka, Pritzker Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and a Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute deputy director, Carolyn Rodriguez, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Karl Deisseroth, the D. H. Chen Professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured in this article along with their colleagues.

  • Mind Matters

    This New Year, Resolve to Dive Headfirst into Life

    In her book Dopamine Nation, Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the abundance of pleasure in modern society, the neuroscience of addiction, and the solution for recovery.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    5 Beneficial Foods for People With Schizophrenia

    Potentially life-shortening conditions like diabetes and obesity are common among people with schizophrenia, which is one reason being mindful of food choices is key. Shebani Sethi, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Consumer Reports

    How to Get a Great Night’s Sleep

    Consumer Reports shows you how to get a great night's sleep and shares expert advice and recommendations for mattresses, pillows, and more. Jamie Zeitzer, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

    2022 Leading Research Achievements

    The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation presents their 2022 Leading Research Achievements by BBRF Grantees, Prizewinners & Scientific Council Members. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Sergiu Pasca, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured for their major accomplishments in 2022.

  • Stanford HAI

    Can We Improve Psychotherapy by Quantifying Therapists’ Language?

    Stanford researchers have created a set of open-source tools to measure therapists’ timing, responsiveness, and consistency to better understand what works. Bruce Arnow, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Adam Miner, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are both mentioned in this article along with some of their colleagues who worked on the study.

  • NBC News

    Ketamine clinics for mental health are popping up across the U.S. Does the treatment work?

    An inhaled version of the drug is approved for severe depression. Many clinics, however, offer injections or infusions for a range of mental health conditions. Smita Das, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • nobhillgazette.com

    New Leaders Making the News in the New Year

    A new year means new opportunities to make the news for these leaders in the arts, sciences and viticulture. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article for the recent 2023 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences he shares with fellow researcher Masashi Yanagisawa of the University of Tsukuba.

  • Psychiatry Unbound | APA Podcast

    Thinking About Prescribing

    Dr. Laura Roberts is joined by Shashank V. Joshi, M.D., FAAP, DFAACAP, and Andrés Martin, M.D., M.P.H. to discuss their new book, , which explores the psychology of psychopharmacology with diverse youth and families. They discuss the creation and editorial approaches taken, their hopes for the book, and what areas of the work might endure as the profession and practices evolve over the coming years. This is an erudite and incisive conversation about a book whose appeal to a wide-ranging readership is -already- beyond question.

  • ReliefWeb

    UNITAD Discusses with Partners Blueprint for Psychosocial Support to Survivors of ISIL Crimes

    With a conference titled “Blueprint for Psychosocial Support of ISIL Crimes Survivors-Trauma Informed and Capacity Building Practices” UNITAD brought together a number of national and international partners to set national strategies for best practices and trauma-informed approaches for all victims of ISIL crimes in Iraq. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Director of the Human Rights and Trauma Mental Health Program, is mentioned for the keynote remarks he presented at the meeting.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    What Is Treatment-Resistant Depression?

    Many people with depression feel better after receiving medicines and therapies to manage their symptoms. However, for some people, standard treatments offer little to no relief. That is what is known as treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Charles DeBattista, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Telegraph

    At what cost is our attachment to the smartphone? Here's how to go on a 'digital diet'

    Do you spend too much time on your phone? Here's what you need to know. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • NY Times

    Why Does My Sleep Become Worse as I Age?

    Research has found that sleep quality does indeed get a little rusty as you grow older, but it’s not a fate you have to live with, experts say. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • PsyPost

    Extreme excitability of a specific type of neuron linked to sleep problems in mice, study finds

    A series of experiments on young and aged mice found that hyperexcitability of a specific type of neurons, called hypocretin neurons, in the lateral hypothalamus regions of the brain is strongly associated with fragmented sleep and sleep instability that develop with age in mice. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Pinkbike

    Outride Shares 2022 Summit Recap of Cycling's Impacts on Brain Activity

    This year marks 10 years since Outride launched a school pilot program to examine how bicycling impacts our brain activity, and how that ultimately impacts attention, focus, and school performance. The results of this work were shared at the 2022 Outride Summit, which brought together an array of leaders and incredible talent from across industries and highlighted what Outride has believed all along: that cycling lights up the brain, and the benefits are far-reaching; cycling can assist in empowering youth and communities to push through the mental health crisis we are currently facing. Allan Reiss, Howard C. Robbins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is featured for his talk on "Exercise, Brain Health and Evolution."

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    Researchers are honing in on potential Fentanyl vaccine amid national opioid crisis

    In the battle against the nation's drug overdose crisis, a vaccine against Fentanyl could be coming down the pike. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • Inverse

    This neuroscientist’s breakthrough experiment could herald a new era of psychiatry

    Sergiu Pasca, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is profiled in this article by Inverse for his work in shifting psychiatric research at large by performing transformations at the cellular level.

  • Bloomberg.com

    Hidden Fentanyl Is Driving a Fatal New Phase in US Opioid Epidemic

    The rise of fentanyl has brought on the most dangerous phase yet in the US’s decades-long opioid epidemic, causing a surge in overdose deaths and crippling efforts to end a devastating addiction crisis. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • 90 seconds with Lisa Kim - Stanford Medicine

    'Sleep age' can determine longterm health

    Numbers tell a story. From your credit score to your age, metrics predict a variety of outcomes, whether it's your likelihood to get a loan or your risk for heart disease. Now, Stanford Medicine researchers have described another telling metric -- one that can predict mortality. It's called sleep age. In this 90 Seconds, Lisa Kim talks with Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about this topic.

  • SELF

    5 Ways to Cope If the Holidays Feel Way Too Stressful Already

    A bit of self-compassion can go a long way. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EurekAlert!

    Researchers gain a better understanding of how the most commonly used ADHD medication works

    For decades, doctors have treated kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) with methylphenidate, making it one of the most widely prescribed medications aimed at the central nervous system. Now, a new study seeks to close the gap on what we know about it, and understand how methylphenidate interacts with cognitive control networks and attentional behavior. The new study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. Yoshifumi Mizuno, Weidong Cai, and Vinod Menon are co-authors along with other colleagues.

  • EurekAlert!

    The potential benefit of metformin to reduce delirium risk and mortality: a retrospective cohort study

    A new research paper was published in Aging's Volume 14, Issue 22, entitled, “The potential benefit of metformin to reduce delirium risk and mortality: a retrospective cohort study.” Metformin has been reported to improve age-related disorders, including dementia, and to lower mortality. This study was conducted to investigate whether metformin use lowers delirium risk, as well as long-term mortality. Gen Shinozaki, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is a coauthor.

  • Allure

    You Don't Have To Look Sick to Be Sick With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    In the world of cancer, stereotypes prevail as norms, perceptions blur with reality, and the past gets warped into the present. It's time to expand society's view of what it means to live with this incurable illness. Sheila Lahijani, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute at Stanford University

    Bold ideas to advance healthy brain aging win inaugural Knight Initiative grants

    The Phil and Penny Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience is proud to announce the recipients of its inaugural 2022 Innovation and Catalyst Grants. These 17 groundbreaking research projects will receive a total of $15.5 million to pursue fresh ideas in the science of healthy brain aging and spearhead innovative methods of combating neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Julie Kauer, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is among the recipients for a project entitled, "Sleep circuits in neurodegenerative disease and aging."

  • ZME Science

    How mindfulness training can help vulnerable children sleep better

    For children living in stressful households, telling them to just sleep more or keep to their bedtime schedule simply doesn’t cut it. What may work instead is mindfulness training, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. Ruth O'Hara, Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • All Tech Is Human

    Co-Creating a Better Tech Future

    All Tech Is Human has released its latest report, "Co-Creating a Better Tech Future: Community visions for aligning our tech future with the public interest." The report draws upon insights from a diverse range of stakeholders including authors, advocates, entrepreneurs, educators, directors, lawyers, policymakers, nonprofit leaders, researchers, and students to help us map out what a better tech future looks like, and how we can co-create it. Vicki Harrison, CYMHW program director, is featured on page 26.

  • LX News

    Powered by Likes: The Social Media Documentary

    From acquiring the coveted blue checkmark to chasing virality, social media’s impact on society continues to increase. Likes, notifications, and comments pull users in with each ding and buzz. Five social media influencers share their insights on the rise of picture-perfect feeds and life beyond the grids in this documentary. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on social media and mental health.

  • HuffPost

    How Sleep Experts Get Through The Day When They're Sleep-Deprived

    Feeling exhausted today? Here's what the pros do after a night of little or no rest. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • Psychology Today

    Take Your Pills: A Review

    A new documentary on benzodiazepines raises fresh questions about dependence. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who is featured in the film, is quoted in this article.

  • Family Caregiver Alliance

    FCA Recognizes Champions of Caregivers for 2022

    Family Caregiver Alliance announced Dolores Gallagher Thompson, emerita professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, among the recipients of this year’s Champions of Caregivers Award. The 2022 awardees are recognized for their outstanding work and contributions toward improving the lives of caregivers and their care recipients. From building community-based programs and improving services through technology to ensuring that the caregiver voice informs policy and research initiatives, these champions are making far-reaching impacts for caregivers. Congratulations, Dr. Gallagher Thompson!

  • Inverse

    Nightmares have plagued humans for millennia — do we finally know how to tame them?

    Neuroscientists and psychologists are researching new treatments that might help us finally understand why nightmares take over our minds and how to quell them. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

    Carolyn Rodriguez receives ACNP Dolores Shockley Diversity and Inclusion Advancement Award

    The American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) has named Carolyn Rodriguez as the winner of the 2022 Dolores Shockley Diversity and Inclusion Advancement Award. The Dolores Shockley Diversity and Inclusion Advancement Award is given in recognition of an ACNP member who has been particularly successful in mentoring young scientists from underrepresented groups in the field of neuropsychopharmacology and related disciplines. The award was named in honor of Dr. Dolores Shockley, the first Black woman to receive a Ph.D. in Pharmacology in the United States and the first Black woman to chair a Pharmacology department in the United States. Congratulations, Dr. Rodriguez!

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    ‘Assembloids’ lay bare autism-linked genes that hamper neuron development

    The model enables the study of autism-linked genes at the earliest stages of neural development. Sergiu Pasca, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    We are Stanford Med: #ThisIsMyWhy with Ben Rein

    Postdoctoral scholar Ben Rein is equally passionate about his neuroscience research and educating the public about science via social media.

  • Austen Riggs Center

    Sally Huang receives Award for Excellence in Psychotherapy from the Austen Riggs Center

    The Austen Riggs Center has named Sally Huang as a recipient of the Award for Excellence in Psychotherapy in 2022. This annual award recognizes and supports the development of psychiatric residents who have demonstrated interest and ability in psychodynamic psychotherapy and/or psychodynamic psychiatry or have shown promise as researchers in biopsychosocial approaches to psychiatric practice, including psychotherapy. Congratulations, Dr. Huang!

  • Inverse

    Can you become a morning person? Sleep scientists say it is possible with these key tips

    Our circadian rhythm is the underlying mechanism that dictates when we start to feel sleepy at night and awake in the morning. And it's absolutely trainable. Jamie Zeitzer, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Washington Post

    Ask a Doctor: Why am I so grumpy after a nap?

    If you’re in a bad mood after a nap, it may be that that your nap was too short or too long. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides advice in this article.

  • USA TODAY

    'A sense of reassurance and belonging' Campus religious groups tackle mental health services

    Religious groups on college campuses that have long counseled students grappling with issues of faith or spirituality are now adding mental health clinicians in campus religious hubs, and training religious leaders to know when to refer students to psychological care. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    This doctor helps Bay Area’s elite athletes cope with mental health challenges

    Mental health was once considered a taboo topic in the fiercely competitive world of sports. But as salaries soared, social media gave fans a platform to vent, and a global pandemic exacerbated the psychological toll, mounting pressure and scrutiny. A number of high-profile athletes have spoken out openly about their struggles with anxiety or depression. Francesco Dandekar, Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • NY Times

    What if You Can’t Find the Silver Lining in Your Illness?

    Ranak Trivedi, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the complicated feelings around experiencing a serious illness.

  • NBC News

    The overlooked reason the Latino vote is turning right

    The overall arc of progress suggests that more Hispanic people are going to be voting conservative in the future. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes this op/ed.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Hans Steiner, child and adolescent psychiatrist, dies at 76

    The Stanford Medicine psychiatrist was an expert in the development of psychopathologies and a beloved mentor to many. He will be greatly missed.

  • kgw.com

    Oregon modeled Measure 110 on Portugal's drug decriminalization. They aren't remotely the same

    Portugal became the first country in the world to decriminalize all drugs in 2001. Oregon's Measure 110 followed that example, but experts say it's not close enough. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    5 Questions: Shebani Sethi on the connection between metabolism and mental health

    A specialist in psychiatry and obesity describes how metabolic disorders affect the brain and how nutrition can help patients with mental illness. Shebani Sethi, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this post.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Opening Up About Having Psychosis: What Experts Want You to Know

    Selena Gomez gave viewers a raw look into her struggles with psychosis and bipolar disorder in her new Apple TV+ documentary. Po Wang, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides information about bipolar disorder in this article.

  • Good Morning America

    Testing the accuracy of wearable sleep trackers

    Experts emphasize the importance of sleep and many people have turned to wearable devices to make sure they're getting their best rest, but which works the best? Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment.

  • Good Morning America

    How to get enough sleep and wake up energized

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than 1 in 3 adults are sleep-deprived and experts are sharing some of the best ways to improve your sleep. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    How to Cope With Bipolar Disorder During the Holidays

    Shorter and darker days can trigger seasonal depression among people with bipolar disorder, who have an increased risk for this condition. Po Wang, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NBC Bay Area

    Why Do Humans Continue to Play the Lottery?

    NBC Bay Area’s Raj Mathai spoke to David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about what a Powerball jackpot of nearly $2 billion, does to the human brain.

  • KCBS Radio

    Why Can't Our Bodies Immediately Adjust During Daylight Saving Time?

    Early Sunday morning marks the end of daylight saving time, but despite gaining an extra hour, our bodies and brains feel the stress of the time change. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    New visions for mental health care

    What would it take to translate cutting-edge science into accessible, effective mental health care? At the inaugural Mental Healthcare Innovations Summit held Oct. 6, a collaboration between the Stanford Healthcare Innovation Lab and the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, experts from various sectors came together to discuss this question and share new innovations, approaches and collaborations in mental health care. Leanne Williams, the Vincent V.C. Woo Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this article.

  • IEEE Pulse

    Enhancing Mental Health Care With VR

    Immersive technologies may offer improved efficiency and precision for assessing, treating, and studying psychiatric and psychological conditions. Kim Bullock, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Health

    Older Adults Who Sleep Less Are More Likely to Develop Multiple Chronic Diseases

    Older adults who sleep just five hours a night or fewer have a greater risk of multimorbidity, or having more than one chronic disease, new research shows. The findings underscore the importance of healthy sleep patterns throughout life, and especially in middle and old age. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NBC News

    The message in 'Friends' star Matthew Perry's 15 rehab stints

    About 3 out of every 4 people who have a substance use problem will eventually recover — if they keep at it. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides his perspective in this opinion piece.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Social aversion during opioid withdrawal reflects blocked serotonin cues, mouse study finds

    Neuroscientist Robert Malenka and his team have identified a molecular link between opioid withdrawal and social aversion in the brains of mice — suggesting the potential to help people in recovery from opioid addiction reconnect with their social support networks.

  • Easy Reader News

    Ribbon cut for Beach Cities youth mental health center

    Beach Cities Health District held a ribbon-cutting Oct. 18 for allcove Beach Cities, the first branch of a youth mental health program developed at Stanford University. The Redondo Beach facility – to open on the fourth floor of the former South Bay Hospital at the BCHD’s main campus, serves people ages 12 to 25.

  • National Geographic

    Animals dream too—here's what we know

    Scientists are learning more than ever before about animal dreamers. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Stanford Medicine commemorates the multifaceted LGBTQIA+ experience

    An Evening of Queer Joy, formerly known as the LGBTQ+ Forum, is a recent event intended to share and celebrate the full range of emotions felt by those in the LGBTQIA+ community as well as to examine the queer experience, what it has been, and where it’s going. Neda Kharrazi, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted along with other colleagues from across the SOM at the event.

  • Well Being Trust

    California youth; allcove members invited to present at international mental health conference

    Several members of allcove, a network providing emotional, physical, and social support to youth and young adults in California, recently presented findings from the ACCESS (Anti-Racist, Culturally-Minded Community Education, Support, and Services) project, at the International Association for Youth Mental Health Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

  • Stanford Magazine

    How to Be a Morning Person

    Anyone can learn how to wake up earlier—and feel good about it. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Psychiatry professor Mark McGovern receives more than $25 million to promote health equity

    Mark McGovern, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and his team have recently received more than $25 million in grants to fund research on providing quality health care for underserved U.S. residents via three national, federally funded centers. The three centers make up Stanford Medicine’s Center for Behavioral Health Services and Implementation Research.

  • Washington Post

    A piano chord helped reduce chronic nightmares, a study showed

    The method, which combined an established treatment — imagery rehearsal therapy — with a sound, led to fewer nightmares for as long as three months afterward. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    2022 Sammy Kuo Award Winners

    The Sammy Kuo Awards in Neuroscience encourage meritorious neuroscience research at the postdoctoral and graduate levels at Stanford, and serve as an inspiration as well as a profound reminder of the impact translational research has on patients and their families. Congratulations to this year's recipients, including Third Place award recipients - Omer Revah, Felicity Gore, and Kevin Kelley, in the Pasca Lab for the paper "Maturation and circuit integration of transplanted human cortical organoids" published in Nature.

  • Hadassah Magazine

    An Eating Disorder Pandemic

    According to clinicians, the incidence of eating disorders—anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating and other forms of mental illness around food—has risen dramatically during the pandemic. Debra Safer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Stanford Daily

    How Stanford students are helping peers recover from addiction

    Whether it be daily meetings or substance-free socials, the Cardinal Recovery program is pushing back against the stigma of collegiate recovery. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • US News and World Report

    New Plan Would Help Pregnant Women Fight Opioid Addiction

    Pregnant women with opioid addiction have both a compelling reason to change and a harder time getting medications to battle their substance use disorder. A new plan would expand the use of medications to treat addiction in pregnant women through federal court and health programs. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KQED

    A Hospice Volunteer

    As a hospice volunteer, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has experienced the depth of the bonds that friendship in the face of death can forge.

  • ADDitude

    What Does Hoarding Disorder Look Like?

    Individuals with hoarding disorder may compulsively save or have difficulty discarding items they believe have sentimental, instrumental, or intrinsic value. Why do people hoard if their accumulated clutter hinders their function, health, and safety? Carolyn Rodriguez, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Museum of Science, Boston

    Using Human Brain Cells in Rats to Understand Psychiatric Disorders

    The journal Nature published a groundbreaking new study involving the transfer of human brain organoids into the brains of rats. Insoo Hyun, Director of the Center for Life Sciences and Public Learning at the Museum of Science, speaks candidly with Sergiu Pasca, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about his research. Why did he do it? How might this uncover the mysteries of psychiatric disorders? And the Big Question we are all wondering about – can these rats ever develop “human-like” consciousness? Together they demystify the science.

  • Deep Dives with ISPU

    The mental health of Muslim healthcare workers

    Since the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has overwhelmed healthcare systems, and the burden of care for the nearly unprecedented volume of patients has fallen on the shoulders of healthcare workers (HCWs). To understand how American Muslim HCWs working in the United States have been impacted by this stress, and how they have been coping with it, the Mental Health of Muslim Healthcare Workers study surveyed nearly 700 American Muslim HCWs about one year into the pandemic. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides study details on this podcast.

  • NPR.org

    As drug deaths surge, one answer might be helping people get high more safely

    In Canada, a growing network of clinics helps active drug users get high more safely. Many public health experts want similar "harm reduction" programs in the U.S., where drug deaths have surged. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Impact Labs

    Introducing Nine New Design Fellows

    The Stanford Impact Labs Design Fellowship welcomes nine new faculty members from across the university to its program. Fellows will apply their research skills to address pressing social problems, from climate disaster mitigation to voter turnout to suicide prevention. The program helps each fellow develop an impact-oriented research agenda, in collaboration with external partners. Congratulations to Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, for her project, entitled "Suicide-prevention among American Muslims."

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Secret of neuron’s shape revealed in study of worms, rodents, people

    A collaborative research project across the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute labs and both sides of the Atlantic has discovered a mechanism for keeping neuron’s specialized axons and dendrites separate.

  • 90 Seconds w/ Lisa Kim - Stanford Medicine

    Transplanting human-derived “organoids” allows scientists to study brain disorders

    In this 90 Seconds, Lisa Kim talks with Sergiu Pasca, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on how recent research allows for a more accelerated and precise study of complex psychiatric conditions, leading to targeted therapies to treat them.

  • India Times

    Researchers Find Why Teenage Brains Start Ignoring Their Mother's Voice

    Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences explains, “A child becomes independent at some point, and that has to be precipitated by an underlying biological signal. That’s what we’ve uncovered: This is a signal that helps teens engage with the world and form connections which allow them to be socially adept outside their families.”

  • American Muslim Today

    World Mental Health Day: It’s Time We Tackle Addiction

    Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins colleague Taimur Kouser to write this piece for World Mental Health Day and highlight the taboos around discussing substance abuse.

  • Allure

    Smartwatches Can Be Toxic, Too

    If your fitness tracker is making you feel bad, you're not alone. It's easy for people to become obsessed with meeting goals set by these smart trackers. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Middle East Eye

    Why the Muslim-American community shies away from talking about suicide

    While there are frequent cases of suicide within the Muslim population, community leaders still struggle to talk about it. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • ADDitude

    What Is Hoarding Disorder? Defining Characteristics, Treatments, and ADHD Link

    Hoarding disorder develops from vulnerabilities, information-processing problems, and a perceived need to save items regardless of their value. It may co-occur with ADHD but is distinct from ADHD messiness or clutter. Carolyn Rodriguez, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Runner's World

    Why Am I Tired All the Time? We Have a Few Answers

    We all have days that drag. But if you’re tired more often than not, it could be for one of these reasons. Scott Kutscher, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Human brain cells transplanted into rat brains hold promise for neuropsychiatric research

    Lab-grown clusters of human brain cells integrate so well into young rats’ brains they enable researchers to study neurodevelopmental disorders’ molecular and circuit underpinnings. The work of Sergiu Pasca, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and colleagues, is highlighted in this article.

  • Psychiatry Online

    Psychiatry Unbound Podcast: Refugee Mental Health

    Laura Roberts, chairman and Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and APA Books Editor-in-Chief, is joined by J. David Kinzie, co-editor of "The Psychiatric Evaluation and Treatment of Refugees" in the latest episode of APA Publishing's Books podcast. They discuss Kinzie’s career-spanning work in this field, and hear his thoughts on treating people suffering from intense trauma and stigmatization.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    Should kids take mental health days? Here’s what experts think

    How can parents assess whether their child or teen needs to take a mental health day? Elizabeth Reichert, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Atlantic

    When Virtues Become Vices

    When addictive behaviors override our desires, it may be a sign to investigate the gap between what we crave and what’s really good for us. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this podcast episode.

  • Fox News

    Oregon drug decriminalization leads to spike in drug abuse

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the consequences of Oregon's drug decriminalization and how the state's culture has impacted the crisis in this piece.

  • Love Yourself So Matcha: Tea Time with the Experts

    Risk Factors and Prevention of Eating Disorders

    In this episode of Love Yourself So Matcha, Eric Stice, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins the host to discuss his work in identifying risk factors of eating disorders and designing and evaluating treatment interventions to prevent them.

  • Huberman Lab Podcast

    Psychedelics & Neurostimulation for Brain Rewiring

    Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins Andrew Huberman, associate professor of neurobiology and, by courtesy, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, for a podcast episode where they discuss "Psychedelics & Neurostimulation for Brain Rewiring."

  • KCRW

    Dopamine Nation: Living in a world where we’re all addicted

    Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes how our relentless pursuit of pleasure leads to greater addiction and pain.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Ask me anything: Neuroscience with Andrew Huberman

    Andrew Huberman, associate professor of neurobiology and, by courtesy, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins Stanford Medicine in an Ask Me Anything featuring topics such as human behavior and neuroscience. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is also mentioned.

  • SELF

    Most of Us Are Stressed as Hell. Does That Mean We Should Be Screened for Anxiety?

    A mental health crisis has been swelling in the United States—and far too little has been done on a national level to improve how we identify, diagnose, and treat people who are living with conditions like anxiety and depression. Now, public health experts are taking a step toward getting people the care they need. In a draft recommendation published in late September, the US Preventive Services Task Force, a national panel of medical experts, said plans should be made to screen adults under the age of 65 for anxiety. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Medicine Children’s Health | Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    The Pros and (Mostly) Cons of Waiting 12 Weeks to Share Pregnancy News

    Debunking the ‘wait 12 weeks to tell’ pregnancy rule can help women get the proper support after a miscarriage. Ellie Williams, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this post.

  • WIRED

    The High Cost of Living Your Life Online

    Constantly posting content on social media can erode your privacy—and sense of self. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • nature

    Mouse embryo models built from stem cells take shape in a dish

    Two groups have grown self-organizing models of mouse embryos from stem cells in vitro. The models mimic mid-gestation embryos, providing an unparalleled opportunity to study early embryonic development. Sergiu Pasca, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Neal Amin, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, write this article.

  • SFGATE

    Rise In Fentanyl Deaths Prompts Creation Of Bipartisan Special Committee

    As opioid and fentanyl addiction continues to take the lives of Californians, state officials have created a bipartisan committee to find a solution that pairs strategies from public health and law enforcement. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • National Institutes of Health

    allcove youth advisor among awardees for the NIH's 2022 "Speaking Up about Mental Health! This Is My Story" national essay contest

    The National Institutes of Health announced 15 awardees for the 2022 "Speaking Up about Mental Health! This Is My Story" national essay contest. The contest seeks to start conversations about mental health and encourage young people to access help for mental health issues. Rohan, an allcove Youth Advisory Group member, received a silver award for his essay, "It’s Time to Rebrand Mental Illness: Addressing the Crisis of Stigmatization." Congratulations, Rohan!

  • Los Angeles Times

    My anxiety meter runs hot; VR meditation helped me relax

    Could VR meditation be helpful in lowering stress in particular situations? Hui Qi Tong, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Why 4-day workweeks may be better for your career and health

    Employees working condensed weeks sleep more, a pilot program shows, leading to improvement in a variety of well-being and productivity measures. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • CalMatters

    Strong alliances could put a dent in the meth epidemic

    Drug addiction has become an ideological Rorschach test: a disease meriting treatment for some, and a crime deserving punishment for others. California’s methamphetamine epidemic challenges these polarized perspectives, because the drug inflicts both devastating harm on users and victimization on others. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares perspective along with Mayor Sam Liccardo in this piece.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Keith Humphreys given honor approved by Queen Elizabeth II

    Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and an international expert on addiction treatment and public policy, has been named an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire. Queen Elizabeth II approved the honor before she died, and it was announced by her government Sept. 23. Congratulations, Dr. Humphreys!

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    NIH awards Stanford Medicine teams $10 million for research on sleep and autism

    About 80% of children with autism have trouble sleeping, but whether better sleep could lessen other autism symptoms is unknown. A new grant will help Stanford Medicine scientists find out. Joachim Hallmayer, principal investigator for the award and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Ruth O’Hara, the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and senior associate dean for research in the School of Medicine, Makoto Kawai, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the director of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Clinic, Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Booil Jo, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Jennifer Phillips, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are all mentioned.

  • NPR.org

    Invisibilia: Therapy Ghostbusters

    In San Jose, California, a community clinic was stumped as to why their clients were seeing ghosts. This week, a story about grappling with ghosts of our past and one clinic's attempt to heal intergenerational trauma. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed with colleagues in this episode.

  • mindbodygreen

    These 7 Best Weighted Blanket To Soothe Your Nervous System & Improve Sleep

    There are many factors that could be contributing to poor sleep—and small changes in your routine, like the adding the best products for insomnia, could help. One remedy for sleeplessness that's exploded in popularity in recent years are weighted blankets with people, especially those suffering from stress and anxiety, boasting about their positive impact on sleep quality. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Report

    Three Stanford faculty appointed to VPUE leadership positions

    The three faculty roles have been announced to provide counsel to the VPUE, Sarah Church, on the most pressing issues facing undergraduates at Stanford. The VPUE Office has welcomed Shashank Joshi, professor (teaching) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and, by courtesy of pediatrics and, of education, into a newly created faculty role—assistant vice provost for academic well-being. Joshi will advise on the impact of academic stress on student well-being and will help advance an emerging set of academic well-being initiatives during the 2022-23 academic year and beyond.

  • OPB

    Addiction experts tell Oregon lawmakers the state has been too lax on drug use

    Oregon health officials announced a notable milestone this week, revealing they’d awarded more than $300 million meant to expand services for people with drug addiction. But a pair of addiction experts warned Wednesday that more than just services will be necessary in order to stem the state’s high rate of drug use — and the growing societal costs that come with it. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, recently spoke with the state’s Senate Committee on the Judiciary and Ballot Measure 110 Implementation.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Emmanuel Mignot wins Breakthrough Prize for discovering cause of narcolepsy

    Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the winner of a 2023 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. He will share the $3 million prize with Masashi Yanagisawa of the University of Tsukuba for discovering the causes of narcolepsy and paving the way for new treatments for sleep disorders. Congratulations, Dr. Mignot!

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Do synchronized brains predict happy marriages?

    Researchers found that couples who share similar brain activity while watching movie scenes about marriage report happier relationships. Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes the findings.

  • HuffPost

    The Invisible Cost Of Caring For A Child With A Health Condition

    Two recent studies reveal that parents caring for a child with a health condition often suffer from depression and PTSD. Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • TED Talks

    How we're reverse engineering the human brain in the lab

    Sergiu Pasca, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Uytengsu Family Director of the Stanford Brain Organogenesis Program, has made it his life's work to understand how the human brain builds itself -- and what makes it susceptible to disease. In this TED talk, he shows how his team figured out how to grow "organoids" and what they call brain "assembloids" -- self-organizing clumps of neural tissue derived from stem cells that have shown the ability to form circuits -- and explains how these miniature parts of the nervous system are bringing us closer to demystifying the brain.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Addressing mental health struggles among health care workers

    Tait Shanafelt discusses physician suicide as a national crisis, and how to support health care workers' mental health. Links are provided to a collection of videos, hosted by The Stanford Center for Health Education, that explore how to help someone grieving, what to say to a friend who is thinking about suicide, and coping strategies for educators and students. Stories that take an honest look at physician distress, grief and other topics surrounding mental health are also featured. Mickey Trockel, Shashank Joshi, Hui Qi Tong, David Spiegel, Debra Kaysen, Sarah Hegarty, and Victor Carrion are mentioned.

  • BBC

    The medical power of hypnosis

    Hypnosis is emerging as a powerful medical treatment for pain, anxiety, PTSD and a range of other conditions. Can it shake off its reputation as a stage magician's trick? David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KCRW

    ‘One pill can kill’ is no longer extreme thinking, says psych professor

    Teens are typically looking for anti-anxiety or ADHD pills, or lower-strength opioids, but many illicit, fentanyl-laced pills on the market that resemble legit drugs. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    PTSD common in parents of kids with severe cardiac conditions, Stanford-led study finds

    Nearly half of parents with a child who received an implantable device to correct abnormal heart rhythms met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, a Stanford-led study found. Korey Hood, professor of pediatrics and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured along with other study team members.

  • Microsoft Accessibility Blog

    Human-AI Collaboration to Encourage Empathic Conversations

    To address the lack of providers to meet the increased need for support, a number of mental health organizations have taken the path of peer-to-peer support, connecting millions of people online. A team from the University of Washington (UW) set out to explore ways of create more empathy in the peer-to-peer support conversations on mental health platforms. Adam Miner, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned.

  • Psychiatric News

    Hoarding: Ownership Gone Awry

    People who have hoarding disorder are attached to most of the same things as other people—the difference is in the amount. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, co-authors this Psychiatric News article.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Is It Safe to Get Mental Health Medication From an App?

    If you’re considering virtual mental health care through an app, experts recommend you take certain precautions before signing up. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • San Mateo Daily Journal

    Youth drop-in health center in the works in San Mateo

    The Peninsula Health Care District recently unveiled its plan to launch a mental health drop-in center in San Mateo for youth between the ages of 12 and 25 to address the group’s specific range of wellness needs sooner rather than later. Two allcove centers opened in Santa Clara County last year with $15 million in funding from the county’s Mental Health Services Act Innovation Plan and in partnership with the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing.

  • Consumer Health News | HealthDay

    Better Glucose Control in Youth With T1D Might Prevent Brain Changes

    A hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system might prevent or reverse some alterations to the developing brain in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Nature Communications. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Karl Deisseroth to share Horwitz Prize for pioneering contributions to optogenetics

    Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is honored for developing a technology that lets researchers pinpoint the functions — and malfunctions — of specific brain circuits. Congratulations, Dr. Deisseroth!

  • The San Francisco Standard

    ‘Overwhelmed With Fentanyl’: Why the Deadly Opioid is Pouring Into San Francisco From Mexico

    The drug that accounted for most of the 108,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. last year is easier to make and more profitable than heroin. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • CBC

    The way we approach autism is evolving

    A Calgary family wanted to try whole genome sequencing after they heard about it on Facebook from other parents of children with autism. That’s given them some hope that, one day, the research could make life easier for their son. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • National Institutes of Health

    NIH awards $100 million for Autism Centers of Excellence program

    The National Institutes of Health has awarded a total of $100 million over the next five years to support nine Autism Centers of Excellence (ACEs). This endeavor funds large research projects to understand and develop interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Created in 2007, the ACE program is renewed every five years. The new "Stanford University – Center for Sleep in Autism Spectrum Disorder" is among the nine ACES recently announced - congratulations, all!

  • National Geographic Family

    Why bicycling might keep your kid’s mental health in high gear

    The science behind why riding a bike might boost mental well-being, plus 7 ideas to get children pedaling. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is quoted.

  • Medium

    Essential Spotlight: allcove takes an innovative approach to youth mental health, letting young…

    According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, adolescents and young adults aged 15–24 had a suicide rate of 14 per 100,000 individuals. Too often, California’s youth face a lack of access to emotional and mental health support. The Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission provides funding for innovative services and programs to address this issue. One of the state-funded programs, which tackles the mental health issues of youth, is the allcove™ program. allcove is Santa Clara County’s first integrated care center for ages 12–25, established in partnership with Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, Stanford Medicine Children’s Health and Alum Rock Counseling Center.

  • Washington Post

    Child trauma experts weigh in on police video

    Five experts reviewed body-camera video of an encounter between two officers and a 5-year-old that went viral last year. Ryan Matlow, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    2022 Women in Medicine Month

    We asked some of the #StanfordWIM in our department to share their stories - why they pursued a career in medicine, what their work focuses on, what the most fulfilling parts of their work are, and what advice they would give someone starting in the field. Read what they have to say! #WomenInMedicine

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Scientists use 'sleep age' to infer longterm health

    Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds professor of sleep medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor, by courtesy, of genetics and of neurology, answers questions about sleep age, emphasizing the importance of developing good sleep hygiene.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Improved blood sugar control helps normalize diabetic teens’ brains, Stanford-led study finds

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, provides comment.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    DOJ warns of spike in 'rainbow fentanyl' as dealers target young Bay Area teens

    Rainbow fentanyl also referred as 'rainbow fent,' comes in the form of brightly-colored pills or powder that looks like sidewalk chalk. Investigators say dealers are using the bold colors to attract teens- in some cases pressing the drug into food like fruit loops. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Health Problems Linked to Untreated Narcolepsy

    Having narcolepsy can put you at risk for other health conditions like obesity, depression, anxiety, and more. Find out what you can do to avoid these issues. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds professor of sleep medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor, by courtesy, of genetics and of neurology, is quoted.

  • NY Times

    ‘The Best Tool We Have’ for Self-Harming and Suicidal Teens

    Studies indicate that dialectical behavior therapy offers greater benefits than more generalized therapy. But treatment is intensive, and expensive. Michele Berk, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • APA Publishing

    Psychiatry Unbound: Women's Reproductive Mental Health

    In this podcast, Laura Roberts, the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is joined by Lucy Hutner and Lauren Osborne, two of the editorial group who developed "The Textbook of Women’s Reproductive Mental Health," written along with 60 contributing authors.

  • Neurology Live

    Turning Back the Clock: Pediatric Sleep Disorders and the Start of School

    The transition period between summer and school represents a key time for children and adolescents to focus on sleep, correct poor sleep habits, and set themselves up for long-term success, both academically and physically. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • EurekAlert!

    More parents than patients develop PTSD after cardiovascular defibrillators are implanted in their children

    More than one in eight children (12%) receiving implanted cardiovascular defibrillators (ICDs) for heart rhythm problems exhibit signs of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new report in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. Importantly, trauma is even more of a problem for their families, with nearly half of parents (47%) meeting the screening criteria for PTSD. Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Psychiatric News

    Special Report: Precision Psychiatry—Are We Getting Closer?

    This article discusses precision psychiatry as an integrative approach, one that pulls together the scientific foundation of the discipline and recent neuroscientific, technological, and computational advances and directs them at closing the gap between discovery and clinical translation. Leanne Williams, the Vincent V.C. Woo Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares the latest in the field in this Psychiatric News article.

  • KCRW

    Should LA invest in safe injection sites?

    Gov. Newsom on Monday vetoed legislation that would’ve allowed LA, SF, and Oakland to open sites where people struggling with addiction can use drugs in a controlled environment. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Los Angeles Blade

    Mental health challenges facing LGBTQ+ youth

    This article outlines how LGBTQ+ students and their families can protect their mental health in hostile educational environments, including by seeking help from qualified therapists. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • Yahoo

    Governor Newsom proposes $4.7B in mental health services for California kids

    Governor Newsom has unveiled a $4.7 billion proposal to support the mental health of young Californians. KTVU spoke with Raul Poulsen, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the new proposal in this piece.

  • Health Central

    The Causes, Symptoms, and Diagnosis of, plus the Treatments for, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Learn what can lead to PTSD, plus how doctors diagnosis and treat this mental health condition. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

    The Neurobiology Behind Young People’s Shift in Interest From Mother’s Voice to Those of Non-Family Members

    Teenagers who seem to stop listening to their parents are the very image of youth rebelliousness, but new brain research tells us that something more interesting—and completely unconscious—is going on. In addition to any oppositional tendencies that youths may start to show around the age of puberty, they are also experiencing a previously undiscovered shift in the neurobiology of the brain. Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Women's Health

    ‘I Never Thought I Had ADHD...Until I Got On TikTok’

    Videos on the app are leading more women to self-diagnose with forms of neurodiversity like ADHD and autism. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • SELF

    3 Important Things to Do If You Didn’t Get Enough Sleep Last Night

    Grabbing an afternoon latte isn’t one of them. No matter the reason(s), a restless night can make getting through the next day seem Herculean. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides some recommendations.

  • The Daily Beast

    The Promising New Treatment for Depression? Giant Magnets.

    For people whose mood disorders don’t respond to medications or conventional therapies, transcranial magnetic stimulation might be their best hope yet. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CBS Bay Area

    Stanford-Lancet Report on Opioid Crisis Calls For Immediate Action, Sweeping Reforms

    A new report on the nation's ongoing opioid crisis is calling for urgent steps to be taken for a deepening disaster that is afflicting every corner of the Bay Area. Keith Humphreys, chair of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the opioid crisis and the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this piece.

  • MindSite News

    Overdose Deaths Now Top 100,000 a Year. Why Do So Few People Addicted to Opioids Get Treatment that Could Save Them?

    The opioid crisis that killed a record 108,000 Americans last year is by now a well-known tragedy. Yet many of these deaths are preventable with the use of medications like buprenorphine. Trouble is only a small fraction of the people in the U.S. addicted to opioids have access to these medications. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Healio

    Initiative connects adolescent and young adults with cancer to peers, resources

    Adolescence can be an awkward, transitional time for many people, but for adolescents and young adults living with cancer, these years may be even more confusing and alienating. Catherine Benedict, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • USA TODAY

    Bravery in the face of the unimaginable

    Beyond her acting and singing career, Olivia Newton-John should be remembered for her ability to live life to the fullest - an inspirational example of resilience. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Med Page Today

    Nurture Over Nature: Environment Plays Greater Role in Teen Psychosis

    Environmental risk factors may play a larger role than genetic factors in the development of psychotic experiences in adolescents, according to a twin study in Europe. Laramie Duncan, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Graduate School of Education

    Online therapy for autism

    Grace Gengoux, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Autism Intervention Clinic, shares an effective approach to therapy for children with autism.

  • The Nob Hill Gazette

    Go to Sleep!

    Easier said than done during our modern times, but just as important as ever when it comes to overall health. The Stanford Sleep Medicine Center and faculty are featured in this article.

  • Nature

    Hybrid brains: the ethics of transplanting human neurons into animals

    Transplanting human cells into animal brains brings insights into development and disease along with new ethical questions. Sergiu Pasca, the Bonnie Uytengsu and Family Director of Stanford Brain Organogenesis and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned.

  • Stanford Center for Health Education

    Mental Health | What to Know: Free videos explain the basics of common mental health conditions

    Explore evidence-based videos featuring Stanford Medicine experts as they explain key information about some of the most prevalent mental health conditions in the world today. Topics include: Social Media and Mental Health, OCD, Schizophrenia, Addiction, Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Psychedelics and Mental Health, Suicide loss and coping, PTSD, and more.

  • THRIVE

    How Your Teen’s Daytime Habits Can Set the Stage for Better Sleep

    For many teens, the end of summer means a return to busy schedules and long days filled with school, homework, sports and more. They may not be focusing on how their daytime actions affect their nighttime sleep, but there are a number of tips to keep in mind throughout the day that can help set the stage for healthier and better slumber. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Tuning out mom’s voice is key to a teen’s social growth

    Moms, listen up: If your 13-year-old appears to hear only, “Wah wah,” when you speak, don’t worry. That’s just her brain helping her to start separating from you by turning down your voice and turning up unfamiliar voices. Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Assembloid models usher in a new era of brain science

    Here come the assembloids: A new type of brain model reveals the organ’s workings in unparalleled detail, providing insights into development and disease. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Depression improved by new type of magnetic brain stimulation

    Individually targeted and specifically timed high doses of magnetic brain stimulation bring on remission in 78% of study participants with severe depression. Nolan Williams, MD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Alan Schatzberg, MD, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Identifying which brain cells drive sexual behavior in mice

    Genetic research in mice helps scientists identify groups of brain cells that are responsible for driving gender-specific sexual behaviors. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, is featured.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Which molecules do a dozen scientists find most fascinating?

    In telling us about their favorite molecules, a dozen researchers reveal their enchantment with doing science that helps explain the world within us. Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares her favorite - vasopressin - in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Accelerating research into the mysteries of human biology

    Relocating its medical school to Palo Alto set the stage for Stanford medical students, researchers and physicians to be leaders in accelerating biomedical discoveries and advances. Ruth O’Hara, senior associate dean for research and the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Overcoming opioid regulation discord to put patients first

    Keith Humphreys, chair of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the opioid crisis and the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, calls on disparate groups to work together to put patients first.

  • Medpage Today

    Embracing the Terror of Being Alive

    Anna Lembke, the author of Dopamine Nation and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about our society-wide overindulgence in pleasure in this recent podcast.

  • Technical Ripon

    What is Segmented Sleep? - Technical Ripon

    Most of us sleep the same way. Fall into bed late at night and spend the next 8 hours – if we’re lucky – dreaming and snoring until the alarm goes off. But not everyone does it that way. Some people split their sleep into two or more shifts. It’s called segmented sleep and there’s a lot of buzz about it being the right choice in today’s fast-paced world. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Healio

    Shift to daylight savings time causes social jet lag in adolescents

    Research shows that switching to daylight saving time not only causes short-term daytime sleepiness in adolescents, it may be linked to chronic mental health issues, Christina Chick, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, spoke on the topic at a recent SLEEP meeting.

  • 90 Seconds w/ Lisa Kim - Stanford Medicine

    The science behind aging & sleep

    The implications of chronically poor sleep can be far-reaching and include a decline in cognitive functioning and detrimental effects on health and general well-being. Fortunately, relief may be in sight. A new study shows that neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a brain region, play a pivotal role in sleep loss in old mice. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Shi-Bin Li, instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    5 Questions: Rob Malenka on basic research, psychedelic drugs and psychiatric disorders

    Early research by Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on the molecular mechanisms underlying memory and learning has led to an understanding of their role in psychiatric disorders including addiction, depression and autism spectrum disorder.

  • KQED

    California Tackles Teen Sleep Deprivation As New School Start Times Take Effect

    Kids aged 14 to 17 should get a minimum of eight hours of sleep a night, according to the National Sleep Foundation. But more than three-quarters of U.S. high school students report sleeping less than that on school nights, CDC surveys show. To help teens sleep better, California became the first state in the nation to set new start times for public schools: as of July 1, high schools cannot start earlier than 8:30, and middle schools no earlier than 8:00. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment.

  • Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health

    Announcing the 2022 Global Health Seed Grant Awardees

    The Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health announced seven new seed grants, each of which tackles an emerging threat to global health, and each with the potential to one day save human lives. One project, "Local Voices Network: Pilot of an intervention for supporting youth and elders with eco-anxiety in Nigeria, US, UK" will be co-led by Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Britt Wray, Stanford Planetary Health postdoctoral fellow.

  • STAT

    At a 988 call center, volunteers embrace a new number while providing familiar hope

    The national line is answered by a sprawling network of over 200 local, independent centers that also answer calls to their own direct lines. Each state now has at least one center to handle calls to 988 that come from its own area codes. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • The Commonwealth Fund

    Filling Gaps in Access to Mental Health Treatment for Teens and Young Adults

    Amid the stress of COVID-19, the trauma of school shootings, and the tyranny of social media, American youth are caught in a mental health crisis. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.