News from the Department

Latest Stories & News Mentions

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Keith Humphreys given honor approved by Queen Elizabeth II

    Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and an international expert on addiction treatment and public policy, has been named an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire. Queen Elizabeth II approved the honor before she died, and it was announced by her government Sept. 23. Congratulations, Dr. Humphreys!

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    NIH awards Stanford Medicine teams $10 million for research on sleep and autism

    About 80% of children with autism have trouble sleeping, but whether better sleep could lessen other autism symptoms is unknown. A new grant will help Stanford Medicine scientists find out. Joachim Hallmayer, principal investigator for the award and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Ruth O’Hara, the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and senior associate dean for research in the School of Medicine, Makoto Kawai, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the director of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Clinic, Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Booil Jo, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Jennifer Phillips, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are all mentioned.

  • NPR.org

    Invisibilia: Therapy Ghostbusters

    In San Jose, California, a community clinic was stumped as to why their clients were seeing ghosts. This week, a story about grappling with ghosts of our past and one clinic's attempt to heal intergenerational trauma. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed with colleagues in this episode.

  • mindbodygreen

    These 7 Best Weighted Blanket To Soothe Your Nervous System & Improve Sleep

    There are many factors that could be contributing to poor sleep—and small changes in your routine, like the adding the best products for insomnia, could help. One remedy for sleeplessness that's exploded in popularity in recent years are weighted blankets with people, especially those suffering from stress and anxiety, boasting about their positive impact on sleep quality. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Report

    Three Stanford faculty appointed to VPUE leadership positions

    The three faculty roles have been announced to provide counsel to the VPUE, Sarah Church, on the most pressing issues facing undergraduates at Stanford. The VPUE Office has welcomed Shashank Joshi, professor (teaching) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and, by courtesy of pediatrics and, of education, into a newly created faculty role—assistant vice provost for academic well-being. Joshi will advise on the impact of academic stress on student well-being and will help advance an emerging set of academic well-being initiatives during the 2022-23 academic year and beyond.

  • OPB

    Addiction experts tell Oregon lawmakers the state has been too lax on drug use

    Oregon health officials announced a notable milestone this week, revealing they’d awarded more than $300 million meant to expand services for people with drug addiction. But a pair of addiction experts warned Wednesday that more than just services will be necessary in order to stem the state’s high rate of drug use — and the growing societal costs that come with it. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, recently spoke with the state’s Senate Committee on the Judiciary and Ballot Measure 110 Implementation.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Emmanuel Mignot wins Breakthrough Prize for discovering cause of narcolepsy

    Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the winner of a 2023 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. He will share the $3 million prize with Masashi Yanagisawa of the University of Tsukuba for discovering the causes of narcolepsy and paving the way for new treatments for sleep disorders. Congratulations, Dr. Mignot!

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Do synchronized brains predict happy marriages?

    Researchers found that couples who share similar brain activity while watching movie scenes about marriage report happier relationships. Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes the findings.

  • HuffPost

    The Invisible Cost Of Caring For A Child With A Health Condition

    Two recent studies reveal that parents caring for a child with a health condition often suffer from depression and PTSD. Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • TED Talks

    How we're reverse engineering the human brain in the lab

    Sergiu Pasca, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Uytengsu Family Director of the Stanford Brain Organogenesis Program, has made it his life's work to understand how the human brain builds itself -- and what makes it susceptible to disease. In this TED talk, he shows how his team figured out how to grow "organoids" and what they call brain "assembloids" -- self-organizing clumps of neural tissue derived from stem cells that have shown the ability to form circuits -- and explains how these miniature parts of the nervous system are bringing us closer to demystifying the brain.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Addressing mental health struggles among health care workers

    Tait Shanafelt discusses physician suicide as a national crisis, and how to support health care workers' mental health. Links are provided to a collection of videos, hosted by The Stanford Center for Health Education, that explore how to help someone grieving, what to say to a friend who is thinking about suicide, and coping strategies for educators and students. Stories that take an honest look at physician distress, grief and other topics surrounding mental health are also featured. Mickey Trockel, Shashank Joshi, Hui Qi Tong, David Spiegel, Debra Kaysen, Sarah Hegarty, and Victor Carrion are mentioned.

  • BBC

    The medical power of hypnosis

    Hypnosis is emerging as a powerful medical treatment for pain, anxiety, PTSD and a range of other conditions. Can it shake off its reputation as a stage magician's trick? David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KCRW

    ‘One pill can kill’ is no longer extreme thinking, says psych professor

    Teens are typically looking for anti-anxiety or ADHD pills, or lower-strength opioids, but many illicit, fentanyl-laced pills on the market that resemble legit drugs. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    PTSD common in parents of kids with severe cardiac conditions, Stanford-led study finds

    Nearly half of parents with a child who received an implantable device to correct abnormal heart rhythms met criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, a Stanford-led study found. Korey Hood, professor of pediatrics and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured along with other study team members.

  • Microsoft Accessibility Blog

    Human-AI Collaboration to Encourage Empathic Conversations

    To address the lack of providers to meet the increased need for support, a number of mental health organizations have taken the path of peer-to-peer support, connecting millions of people online. A team from the University of Washington (UW) set out to explore ways of create more empathy in the peer-to-peer support conversations on mental health platforms. Adam Miner, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned.

  • Psychiatric News

    Hoarding: Ownership Gone Awry

    People who have hoarding disorder are attached to most of the same things as other people—the difference is in the amount. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, co-authors this Psychiatric News article.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Is It Safe to Get Mental Health Medication From an App?

    If you’re considering virtual mental health care through an app, experts recommend you take certain precautions before signing up. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • San Mateo Daily Journal

    Youth drop-in health center in the works in San Mateo

    The Peninsula Health Care District recently unveiled its plan to launch a mental health drop-in center in San Mateo for youth between the ages of 12 and 25 to address the group’s specific range of wellness needs sooner rather than later. Two allcove centers opened in Santa Clara County last year with $15 million in funding from the county’s Mental Health Services Act Innovation Plan and in partnership with the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing.

  • Consumer Health News | HealthDay

    Better Glucose Control in Youth With T1D Might Prevent Brain Changes

    A hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system might prevent or reverse some alterations to the developing brain in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Nature Communications. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Karl Deisseroth to share Horwitz Prize for pioneering contributions to optogenetics

    Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is honored for developing a technology that lets researchers pinpoint the functions — and malfunctions — of specific brain circuits. Congratulations, Dr. Deisseroth!

  • The San Francisco Standard

    ‘Overwhelmed With Fentanyl’: Why the Deadly Opioid is Pouring Into San Francisco From Mexico

    The drug that accounted for most of the 108,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. last year is easier to make and more profitable than heroin. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • CBC

    The way we approach autism is evolving

    A Calgary family wanted to try whole genome sequencing after they heard about it on Facebook from other parents of children with autism. That’s given them some hope that, one day, the research could make life easier for their son. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • National Institutes of Health

    NIH awards $100 million for Autism Centers of Excellence program

    The National Institutes of Health has awarded a total of $100 million over the next five years to support nine Autism Centers of Excellence (ACEs). This endeavor funds large research projects to understand and develop interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Created in 2007, the ACE program is renewed every five years. The new "Stanford University – Center for Sleep in Autism Spectrum Disorder" is among the nine ACES recently announced - congratulations, all!

  • National Geographic Family

    Why bicycling might keep your kid’s mental health in high gear

    The science behind why riding a bike might boost mental well-being, plus 7 ideas to get children pedaling. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is quoted.

  • Medium

    Essential Spotlight: allcove takes an innovative approach to youth mental health, letting young…

    According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, adolescents and young adults aged 15–24 had a suicide rate of 14 per 100,000 individuals. Too often, California’s youth face a lack of access to emotional and mental health support. The Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission provides funding for innovative services and programs to address this issue. One of the state-funded programs, which tackles the mental health issues of youth, is the allcove™ program. allcove is Santa Clara County’s first integrated care center for ages 12–25, established in partnership with Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, Stanford Medicine Children’s Health and Alum Rock Counseling Center.

  • Washington Post

    Child trauma experts weigh in on police video

    Five experts reviewed body-camera video of an encounter between two officers and a 5-year-old that went viral last year. Ryan Matlow, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    2022 Women in Medicine Month

    We asked some of the #StanfordWIM in our department to share their stories - why they pursued a career in medicine, what their work focuses on, what the most fulfilling parts of their work are, and what advice they would give someone starting in the field. Read what they have to say! #WomenInMedicine

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Scientists use 'sleep age' to infer longterm health

    Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds professor of sleep medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor, by courtesy, of genetics and of neurology, answers questions about sleep age, emphasizing the importance of developing good sleep hygiene.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Improved blood sugar control helps normalize diabetic teens’ brains, Stanford-led study finds

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers. Allan Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, provides comment.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    DOJ warns of spike in 'rainbow fentanyl' as dealers target young Bay Area teens

    Rainbow fentanyl also referred as 'rainbow fent,' comes in the form of brightly-colored pills or powder that looks like sidewalk chalk. Investigators say dealers are using the bold colors to attract teens- in some cases pressing the drug into food like fruit loops. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Health Problems Linked to Untreated Narcolepsy

    Having narcolepsy can put you at risk for other health conditions like obesity, depression, anxiety, and more. Find out what you can do to avoid these issues. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds professor of sleep medicine in psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor, by courtesy, of genetics and of neurology, is quoted.

  • NY Times

    ‘The Best Tool We Have’ for Self-Harming and Suicidal Teens

    Studies indicate that dialectical behavior therapy offers greater benefits than more generalized therapy. But treatment is intensive, and expensive. Michele Berk, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • APA Publishing

    Psychiatry Unbound: Women's Reproductive Mental Health

    In this podcast, Laura Roberts, the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is joined by Lucy Hutner and Lauren Osborne, two of the editorial group who developed "The Textbook of Women’s Reproductive Mental Health," written along with 60 contributing authors.

  • Neurology Live

    Turning Back the Clock: Pediatric Sleep Disorders and the Start of School

    The transition period between summer and school represents a key time for children and adolescents to focus on sleep, correct poor sleep habits, and set themselves up for long-term success, both academically and physically. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • EurekAlert!

    More parents than patients develop PTSD after cardiovascular defibrillators are implanted in their children

    More than one in eight children (12%) receiving implanted cardiovascular defibrillators (ICDs) for heart rhythm problems exhibit signs of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new report in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. Importantly, trauma is even more of a problem for their families, with nearly half of parents (47%) meeting the screening criteria for PTSD. Lauren Schneider, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Psychiatric News

    Special Report: Precision Psychiatry—Are We Getting Closer?

    This article discusses precision psychiatry as an integrative approach, one that pulls together the scientific foundation of the discipline and recent neuroscientific, technological, and computational advances and directs them at closing the gap between discovery and clinical translation. Leanne Williams, the Vincent V.C. Woo Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares the latest in the field in this Psychiatric News article.

  • KCRW

    Should LA invest in safe injection sites?

    Gov. Newsom on Monday vetoed legislation that would’ve allowed LA, SF, and Oakland to open sites where people struggling with addiction can use drugs in a controlled environment. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Los Angeles Blade

    Mental health challenges facing LGBTQ+ youth

    This article outlines how LGBTQ+ students and their families can protect their mental health in hostile educational environments, including by seeking help from qualified therapists. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • Yahoo

    Governor Newsom proposes $4.7B in mental health services for California kids

    Governor Newsom has unveiled a $4.7 billion proposal to support the mental health of young Californians. KTVU spoke with Raul Poulsen, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the new proposal in this piece.

  • Health Central

    The Causes, Symptoms, and Diagnosis of, plus the Treatments for, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Learn what can lead to PTSD, plus how doctors diagnosis and treat this mental health condition. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

    The Neurobiology Behind Young People’s Shift in Interest From Mother’s Voice to Those of Non-Family Members

    Teenagers who seem to stop listening to their parents are the very image of youth rebelliousness, but new brain research tells us that something more interesting—and completely unconscious—is going on. In addition to any oppositional tendencies that youths may start to show around the age of puberty, they are also experiencing a previously undiscovered shift in the neurobiology of the brain. Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Women's Health

    ‘I Never Thought I Had ADHD...Until I Got On TikTok’

    Videos on the app are leading more women to self-diagnose with forms of neurodiversity like ADHD and autism. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this piece.

  • SELF

    3 Important Things to Do If You Didn’t Get Enough Sleep Last Night

    Grabbing an afternoon latte isn’t one of them. No matter the reason(s), a restless night can make getting through the next day seem Herculean. Fiona Barwick, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides some recommendations.

  • The Daily Beast

    The Promising New Treatment for Depression? Giant Magnets.

    For people whose mood disorders don’t respond to medications or conventional therapies, transcranial magnetic stimulation might be their best hope yet. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CBS Bay Area

    Stanford-Lancet Report on Opioid Crisis Calls For Immediate Action, Sweeping Reforms

    A new report on the nation's ongoing opioid crisis is calling for urgent steps to be taken for a deepening disaster that is afflicting every corner of the Bay Area. Keith Humphreys, chair of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the opioid crisis and the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this piece.

  • MindSite News

    Overdose Deaths Now Top 100,000 a Year. Why Do So Few People Addicted to Opioids Get Treatment that Could Save Them?

    The opioid crisis that killed a record 108,000 Americans last year is by now a well-known tragedy. Yet many of these deaths are preventable with the use of medications like buprenorphine. Trouble is only a small fraction of the people in the U.S. addicted to opioids have access to these medications. Keith Humphreys, Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Healio

    Initiative connects adolescent and young adults with cancer to peers, resources

    Adolescence can be an awkward, transitional time for many people, but for adolescents and young adults living with cancer, these years may be even more confusing and alienating. Catherine Benedict, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • USA TODAY

    Bravery in the face of the unimaginable

    Beyond her acting and singing career, Olivia Newton-John should be remembered for her ability to live life to the fullest - an inspirational example of resilience. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Med Page Today

    Nurture Over Nature: Environment Plays Greater Role in Teen Psychosis

    Environmental risk factors may play a larger role than genetic factors in the development of psychotic experiences in adolescents, according to a twin study in Europe. Laramie Duncan, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Graduate School of Education

    Online therapy for autism

    Grace Gengoux, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Autism Intervention Clinic, shares an effective approach to therapy for children with autism.

  • The Nob Hill Gazette

    Go to Sleep!

    Easier said than done during our modern times, but just as important as ever when it comes to overall health. The Stanford Sleep Medicine Center and faculty are featured in this article.

  • Nature

    Hybrid brains: the ethics of transplanting human neurons into animals

    Transplanting human cells into animal brains brings insights into development and disease along with new ethical questions. Sergiu Pasca, the Bonnie Uytengsu and Family Director of Stanford Brain Organogenesis and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned.

  • Stanford Center for Health Education

    Mental Health | What to Know: Free videos explain the basics of common mental health conditions

    Explore evidence-based videos featuring Stanford Medicine experts as they explain key information about some of the most prevalent mental health conditions in the world today. Topics include: Social Media and Mental Health, OCD, Schizophrenia, Addiction, Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Psychedelics and Mental Health, Suicide loss and coping, PTSD, and more.

  • THRIVE

    How Your Teen’s Daytime Habits Can Set the Stage for Better Sleep

    For many teens, the end of summer means a return to busy schedules and long days filled with school, homework, sports and more. They may not be focusing on how their daytime actions affect their nighttime sleep, but there are a number of tips to keep in mind throughout the day that can help set the stage for healthier and better slumber. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Tuning out mom’s voice is key to a teen’s social growth

    Moms, listen up: If your 13-year-old appears to hear only, “Wah wah,” when you speak, don’t worry. That’s just her brain helping her to start separating from you by turning down your voice and turning up unfamiliar voices. Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Assembloid models usher in a new era of brain science

    Here come the assembloids: A new type of brain model reveals the organ’s workings in unparalleled detail, providing insights into development and disease. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Depression improved by new type of magnetic brain stimulation

    Individually targeted and specifically timed high doses of magnetic brain stimulation bring on remission in 78% of study participants with severe depression. Nolan Williams, MD, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Alan Schatzberg, MD, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Identifying which brain cells drive sexual behavior in mice

    Genetic research in mice helps scientists identify groups of brain cells that are responsible for driving gender-specific sexual behaviors. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, is featured.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Which molecules do a dozen scientists find most fascinating?

    In telling us about their favorite molecules, a dozen researchers reveal their enchantment with doing science that helps explain the world within us. Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, shares her favorite - vasopressin - in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Accelerating research into the mysteries of human biology

    Relocating its medical school to Palo Alto set the stage for Stanford medical students, researchers and physicians to be leaders in accelerating biomedical discoveries and advances. Ruth O’Hara, senior associate dean for research and the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Medicine

    Overcoming opioid regulation discord to put patients first

    Keith Humphreys, chair of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the opioid crisis and the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, calls on disparate groups to work together to put patients first.

  • Medpage Today

    Embracing the Terror of Being Alive

    Anna Lembke, the author of Dopamine Nation and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, talks about our society-wide overindulgence in pleasure in this recent podcast.

  • Technical Ripon

    What is Segmented Sleep? - Technical Ripon

    Most of us sleep the same way. Fall into bed late at night and spend the next 8 hours – if we’re lucky – dreaming and snoring until the alarm goes off. But not everyone does it that way. Some people split their sleep into two or more shifts. It’s called segmented sleep and there’s a lot of buzz about it being the right choice in today’s fast-paced world. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Healio

    Shift to daylight savings time causes social jet lag in adolescents

    Research shows that switching to daylight saving time not only causes short-term daytime sleepiness in adolescents, it may be linked to chronic mental health issues, Christina Chick, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, spoke on the topic at a recent SLEEP meeting.

  • 90 Seconds w/ Lisa Kim - Stanford Medicine

    The science behind aging & sleep

    The implications of chronically poor sleep can be far-reaching and include a decline in cognitive functioning and detrimental effects on health and general well-being. Fortunately, relief may be in sight. A new study shows that neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a brain region, play a pivotal role in sleep loss in old mice. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Shi-Bin Li, instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    5 Questions: Rob Malenka on basic research, psychedelic drugs and psychiatric disorders

    Early research by Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on the molecular mechanisms underlying memory and learning has led to an understanding of their role in psychiatric disorders including addiction, depression and autism spectrum disorder.

  • KQED

    California Tackles Teen Sleep Deprivation As New School Start Times Take Effect

    Kids aged 14 to 17 should get a minimum of eight hours of sleep a night, according to the National Sleep Foundation. But more than three-quarters of U.S. high school students report sleeping less than that on school nights, CDC surveys show. To help teens sleep better, California became the first state in the nation to set new start times for public schools: as of July 1, high schools cannot start earlier than 8:30, and middle schools no earlier than 8:00. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment.

  • Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health

    Announcing the 2022 Global Health Seed Grant Awardees

    The Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health announced seven new seed grants, each of which tackles an emerging threat to global health, and each with the potential to one day save human lives. One project, "Local Voices Network: Pilot of an intervention for supporting youth and elders with eco-anxiety in Nigeria, US, UK" will be co-led by Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Britt Wray, Stanford Planetary Health postdoctoral fellow.

  • STAT

    At a 988 call center, volunteers embrace a new number while providing familiar hope

    The national line is answered by a sprawling network of over 200 local, independent centers that also answer calls to their own direct lines. Each state now has at least one center to handle calls to 988 that come from its own area codes. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • The Commonwealth Fund

    Filling Gaps in Access to Mental Health Treatment for Teens and Young Adults

    Amid the stress of COVID-19, the trauma of school shootings, and the tyranny of social media, American youth are caught in a mental health crisis. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • Under Secretary's Award in Health Services Research

    Under Secretary's Award in Health Services Research

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has earned the 2021 Under Secretary’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Health Services Research – the highest honor for a VA health services researcher. Congratulations, Dr. Humphreys!

  • leaps.org

    New study: Hotter nights, climate change, cause sleep loss with some affected more than others

    Published in One Earth, a recent study finds that heat related to climate change could provide a “pathway” to sleep deprivation. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the topic.

  • Cancer Network

    Bridging the Gaps: Taking Care of the Whole Person

    Sheila Lahijani, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, gives her perspective on the need for psycho-oncologists to help patients during their cancer journeys.

  • Fortune

    Life with long COVID: “I remember waking up every day surprised that I was alive”

    Cynthia Adinig details the struggles of living with the chronic illness in this video by Fortune. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in the piece about the mental health impacts of long COVID.

  • The Minor Consult, Stanford Medicine

    Former NIMH Director Dr. Thomas Insel on Addressing the U.S. Mental Health Crisis

    In this episode of The MInor Consult, Dean Lloyd Minor welcomes former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health and Adjunct Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Thomas Insel. Together, they dive into the complex challenges that have exacerbated global mental health throughout COVID-19 pandemic, and how the field must evolve to meet the present moment. They also explore the importance of building organizations around a foundational mechanism or principle, and the power of taking risks to pursue innovation.

  • Stanford's Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Robert Malenka receives Peter Seeburg Integrative Neuroscience Prize 2022

    Congratulations to Robert Malenka, the Nancy Friend Pritzker Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, for receiving the 2022 Peter Seeburg Integrative Neuroscience Prize. The career prize was awarded by the Society for Neuroscience and Federation of European Neuroscientists for Malenka’s “ground-breaking research in identifying the mechanically distinct forms of synaptic plasticity present in the human brain.”

  • National Institute of Mental Health

    Cordelia Erickson-Davis receives 2022 NIMH Outstanding Resident Award

    Congratulations to Cordelia Erickson-Davis, resident in psychiatry, and recipient of NIMH's 2022 Outstanding Resident Awards! This program was introduced to the psychiatry residency training community over 30 years ago to recognize residents with outstanding research and academic potential.

  • the Guardian

    The cult of confidence: could positive thinking be making us feel less secure?

    The past decade has seen a boom in ‘confidence culture’. But behind all the positive thinking, are more cynical forces at work? Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • TODAY

    A new therapy with magnets is helping people with depression when nothing else works

    Stanford researchers share a remarkable new treatment for treatment-resistant depression. The work related to the SAINT trial and Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • Stanford Magazine

    The Mood-Changing Magic of Tidying Up

    If, to your surprise, you’ve found yourself calmed by watching and rewatching YouTube videos of paper being cut into perfect circles, or you are somewhat concerned about the amount of joy you got from reorganizing your closet—fret not. Searching for symmetry and order in these, the tiniest corners of our lives, may be just what the doctor ordered in times of chaos and strife. Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • TODAY

    Science confirms 'hangry' is a real thing people feel in everyday life

    Previous research examined the link between hunger and anger in a lab setting, but this is the first study to track "hanger" in the real world. Debra Safer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Health Leaders Media

    California Initiative Supports the Mental Health of Young People

    allcove centers provide a range of services to young people, including mental health screening, short-term therapy, primary care, and addiction treatment. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about allcove in this article.

  • Psychiatric News

    988 is Coming, But Most Localities Still Not Prepared

    Best practices for crisis intervention include three crucial components: someone to call when a crisis occurs, someone to show up, and somewhere to go if necessary. If the new national mental health crisis hotline is to work as intended, models like this must be put in place. Kyle Lane-McKinley, program manager in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes about 988 in this piece.

  • Smithsonian Magazine

    Can a Mental Health App Help You Deal With Anxiety?

    Experts say the aids can be a first step to meaningful treatment if you choose an app based on three criteria. Eric Kuhn, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Losing sleep in adolescence makes mice less outgoing as adults

    Mice that had sleep interruptions during adolescence had less interest in making new friends later on, a Stanford study shows. Wen-Jie Bian, postdoctoral scholar, and Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • The Paper Gown

    Everything You've Ever Wanted to Know About Snoring - Explainers

    Have you ever been told you snore? If so, you’re in good company: About half of people will snore at some point in their lives, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Here’s everything you need to know about snoring, according to sleep doctors. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • One Mind

    Brain Waves: Youth Mental Health & Destigmatization

    The pandemic has undoubtedly introduced new challenges to supporting our youth’s mental health and wellbeing. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins Brandon Staglin on this episode of Brain Waves™ to talk about our country’s youth mental health crisis and how we can work together with young people to develop effective solutions.

  • Verywell Mind

    Summer Camp After COVID: The Benefits of Camp on Kids and Parents' Mental Health

    'Tis the season for summer camp. Each year, more than six million children flock to camps around the US to spend time outdoors, make new friends, learn new skills, and get away from their parents. But as with so many other things, this American pastime was brought to a halt by the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, as we enter a summer that has the potential for more normalcy, parents are preparing to send their kids off to camp once again. Elizabeth Reichert, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Poor sleep shifts social circuit in mice

    Mice that sleep poorly for a short period in early life grow up to have altered brain activity and atypical social behaviors as adults, according to new research. The findings may help explain the link between sleep difficulties and autism, the researchers say. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provide comment.

  • Stanford Report

    Three Stanford scholars elected to the American Philosophical Society

    Karl Deisseroth, the D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is among 37 scholars elected to the oldest learned society in the United States. Congratulations, Dr. Deisseroth!

  • CNN

    Think you're OK because you only drink on weekends? Think again, study says

    Many "moderate" adult drinkers actually binge drink on weekends and other social occasions, a new study found. Here's why that's a problem. Rudolf Moos, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Runner's World

    You Need Quality Sleep for Better Performance—Here’s What That Means and How To Get It

    To help you catch more shut-eye, Runner's World spoke with experts to break down exactly why you need so much sleep, what it does for your performance, and how to get more quality rest. Scott Kutscher, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • WSJ

    Tech Addiction or Habit? 5 Ways to Assess Your Social-Media Use

    Compulsively checking feeds, never feeling satisfied and being anxious without your phone are clues that your social-media use isn’t healthy. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted with tips for managing tech addictions and habits.

  • The Campanile

    Eating Away at Athletes

    Kristine Luce, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on athletes altering their eating habits due to prescribed plans by trainers, nutritionists and dietitians.

  • The Suburban Newspaper

    Singles or Couples: Who Sleeps Better?

    You might think that having the whole bed to yourself would leave you feeling more refreshed in the morning than sleeping with someone who might toss, turn or snore. Yet, a new study suggests that adults who share their beds with a partner have less severe insomnia, less fatigue and more sleep time. They also report being more satisfied with their lives and relationships, as well as having lower levels of stress, depression and anxiety. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • dot.LA

    TikTok Will Tell You To Take a Break With New Screen Time Tools

    The social media firm is rolling out features to help users limit how much time they spend on the video-sharing app. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Sara Johansen, resident in psychiatry, are quoted.

  • CNET

    Sleep Paralysis: I Hallucinated a Giant Spider, but My Doctor Said It Was Fine

    Sleep paralysis usually occurs when you wake up lying on your back, while your body is still immobilized from the dream phase of sleeping. You can't move a muscle, for anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health

    Ensuring a Trauma-Informed Approach to Accountability for Crimes

    To protect and center the victims’ rights, dignity, and agency during the investigation of war crimes, Stanford University's Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program recently partnered with UNITAD (the United Nations investigative team tasked with holding ISIL, or Da’Esh, accountable for its crimes) to develop an unprecedented Trauma-Informed Investigations Field Guide. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • BuzzFeed News

    How Can People Fall Asleep During True Crime Shows And Podcasts?

    Although it seems counterintuitive, a lot of people find true crime stories can lull them into a slumber. Here’s how it can happen. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Have a hard time waking up?

    Jumping jacks and electric zaps are some of the latest morning technology - here are some of the most popular alarm clocks and apps for heavy sleepers. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Hogrefe News

    Hogrefe authors and editors make list of world’s most influential psychology researchers

    Multiple Hogrefe authors and editors recently made the list of the world’s most influential psychology researchers. The first edition of a ranking of top psychology scientists has recently been published on Research.com. Dolores Gallagher Thompson, professor emerita of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and co-editor of the book "Psychological Assessment and Treatment of Older Adults" is included on the list.

  • Psychiatric News

    Special Report: Prescriber, Prescribe Thyself

    Psychiatrists need to create a partnership that doesn’t lean on psychiatric jargon or an encyclopedic list of side effects, but instead on measured candor, vulnerability, and—most importantly—time. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, co-authors this Special Report.

  • The Atlantic

    The Revolt Against Homelessness

    One candidate running for Governor of California is betting on the frustration of voters on the subject of homelessness. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Addressing Asian and Pacific Islander mental health in the U.S.

    A panel of mental health experts discuss culturally specific barriers to seeking care, along with ways to improve outreach. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Yuhuan Xie, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are all quoted in this article about the panel presentation.

  • The Zoe Report

    Feeling Anxious Before A Big Event? It May Be Anticipatory Anxiety — Here’s How to Manage It

    If you get anxious before a big event, it's likely you are dealing with anticipatory anxiety. Luckily, it can be treated on the spot. Katie Fracalanza, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    70% of Texas counties have more gun dealers than mental health providers, I-Team finds

    According to the 2022 State of Mental Health in America report, Texas ranked last out of all 50 states and the District of Columbia for overall access to mental healthcare. Ranak Trivedi, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Psychiatric News - APA

    Consult Cases Demonstrate Result of Implicit Racial Bias

    When health care professionals hold implicit biases, they risk perpetuating health care disparities and providing inappropriate care. This article is one of a series coordinated by APA’s Council on Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. Mira Zein, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, coauthors this article.

  • Healthier, Happy Lives Blog

    How to Talk to Children About School Shootings

    Parents may be wondering how to have a conversation with their kids after a mass shooting at an elementary school in Texas. Victor Carrion, John A. Turner, M.D. professor and vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Hilit Kletter, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provide guidance.

  • Kaiser Health News

    The Blackfeet Nation’s Plight Underscores the Fentanyl Crisis on Reservations

    The deadly synthetic opioid has spread across the nation during the pandemic, and the problem is disproportionately affecting Native Americans. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • SK Pop

    Goldwater Rule explained as Johnny Depp witness and Stanford psychiatrist labels prior testimony ‘unethical’

    Richard Shaw, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, testified at Johnny Depp's ongoing defamation trial on Tuesday, May 24.

  • Real Simple

    Out of Order

    What you need to know about the most common sleep disorders: snoring, insomnia, apnea, and more. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • US News and World Report

    A Beginner’s Guide to Meditation

    Meditation has many health benefits, but it can be overwhelming to figure out how to meditate. Here are some tips to get started. Hui Qi Tong, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Paper Gown

    The Surprising Risks of Sleeping In on the Weekend

    Contrary to popular belief, turning off your alarm to get more sleep isn’t always the best idea for your overall health. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    Ear Seeds: About This Acupressure Technique

    Ear seeds are small beads or seeds attached to an adhesive material and placed on the ear. Learn more about the potential health benefits of ear seeding. Sue Kim, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • VAntage Point

    PTSD Bytes #9: What is trauma?

    Clinical psychologist Pearl McGee-Vincent discusses trauma with Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and research scientist at the VA's National Center for PTSD.

  • Drug Discovery News

    A dopamine kick switches Non-REM to REM sleep

    Sleep may seem like a mindless activity, but what goes on in the brain when we sleep suggests otherwise. William Giardino, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Seiji Nishino, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, emeritus, are quoted.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    How the grief of a million U.S. COVID-19 deaths hurts us all

    David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how the United States as a community suffers from widespread, prolonged grief, and what to do about it.

  • Med Page Today

    Cognitive Decline in Schizophrenia Begins as Early as Adolescence

    People diagnosed with schizophrenia showed early signs of cognitive decline as well as rapid declines later in life, suggesting that early and consistent interventions might be beneficial to curb these effects, researchers recently reported. Jacob Ballon, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Stanford community celebrates health and wellness

    Members of the Stanford Medicine community came together to celebrate and learn about health and wellness through discussions and activities for the annual Health Matters event. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, gave a talk on the biology of addiction and why and how people can become addicted to certain substances and behaviors, and Stanford YogaX program manager Heather Freeman taught a yoga class.

  • SELF

    The Definition of Trauma Is Evolving—Here’s How That Can Help Us Heal

    Recovery requires an individualized approach, experts say. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on telehealth and mobile apps. The digital well-being program "Pause a Moment" is also mentioned.

  • Newsy

    U.S. overdose deaths hit the highest level on record in 2021

    The CDC recently reported that U.S. overdose deaths hit the highest level on record in 2021 - up 15% from 2020 - a year where overdose deaths were already disproportionately high. And the covid pandemic is one of the factors contributing to deaths from drug overdoses in the U.S. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Fortune

    Psychedelic startups want to solve the mental health crisis

    Startups are creating psychedelic-based drugs to combat the global mental health crisis. But are we ready for a psychedelic sunrise? Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, participated in a panel on the subject recently at FORTUNE Brainstorm Health 2022, and provides comment.

  • HBO Docs Club Podcast

    HBO Docs Club

    The 2017 documentary "Mommy Dead and Dearest," is about the toxic dynamic between Dee Dee and Gypsy Rose Blanchard that ended in murder. In this episode, hosts Brittany and Ronald discuss the provocative documentary that began with a murder and uncovered a lifetime of deception, mental illness, and child abuse. Brittany and Ronald talk with expert Mary Sanders, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the psychology behind Munchhausen by proxy syndrome, and how it affected the dynamic in the Blanchard home.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Mental health hygiene can improve mood, decrease stress

    Creating a routine of mental health hygiene, including daily mindfulness practices, can decrease stress levels and improve mood. Hui Qi Tong, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Washington Post

    U.S. surpasses record 100,000 overdose deaths in 2021

    The number of overdose deaths is a 15 percent increase from the previous year. More than 1 million Americans have now died of drug overdoses in the 21st century, according to federal data released Wednesday. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • Sleep Review

    How Novel Insights From Autoscoring Could Change the Practice of Sleep Medicine

    Sleep study autoscoring is starting to go beyond simply calculating the apnea-hypopnea index and could shape the future of sleep medicine. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Mercury News

    California summer: Why drought makes us scared, edgy, angry

    Climate anxiety is real, according to a growing body of research showing that drought and hot weather are associated with stress, depression and even suicide. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Meet the parents who refuse to give their kids smartphones

    The vast majority of teens and tweens today have smartphones. These parents said no. Bradley Zicherman, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EurekAlert!

    Almost 1 in 4 physicians experience workplace mistreatment, mostly from patients and visitors

    According to new research from Boston Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine, almost a quarter of physicians who responded to a survey at Stanford Medicine experienced workplace mistreatment, with patients and visitors being the most common source. Mickey Trockel, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    The many ways Stanford Medicine is responding to the opioid crisis

    At Stanford Medicine, programs to help patients struggling with substance-abuse disorders, research into addiction, and educational programs to increase awareness about addiction and treatment are aimed at reducing dependence on opioids.

  • Village News

    Stanford expert explains PTSD

    Most of us are familiar with the term PTSD – Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, but what many may not know is that a significant number of those affected with the condition have not sought help. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Evening Debrief

    Evening Debrief: Dr. Keith Humphreys for Newsy

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment on the opioid epidemic in America.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Can a monthly injection be the key to curbing addiction?

    Overdose deaths are rising in California, and physicians say anti-addiction medication holds tremendous potential. Why aren’t more patients getting it? Michael Ostacher, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford collaborates with local school districts to support mental health and well-being

    The Stanford Redwood City Sequoia School Mental Health Collaborative was established in 2020 as a research-practice partnership to support the Redwood City and Sequoia Union High School Districts in building capacity to understand and address the critical mental health needs of thousands of area students and their families. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine - 90 Seconds w/ Lisa Kim

    Tuning Out Mom's Voice

    Did you know that around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices? Lisa Kim talks to Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about this phenomenon.

  • Psychiatric News

    Special Report: What Is ‘Coordinated Specialty Care,’ and Why Is It Effective?

    Early intervention programs for people with psychosis or at high risk of psychosis have expanded rapidly. Coordinated Specialty Care is one model of care that has proven to be effective in reducing symptoms and improving patients’ quality of life. Katherine Eisen, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Kate Hardy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Douglas Noordsy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Jacob Ballon, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, write on the subject in this Psychiatric News special report.

  • the Guardian

    Two weeks, no smartphone: how I tried – and failed – to kick my screen addiction

    James Ball spends countless hours a week staring at his iPhone. Would a fortnight with just old-school text messages and games of Snake shake him out of it? Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    The teen brain tunes in less to Mom’s voice, more to unfamiliar voices, study finds

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found. Study authors Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Percy Mistry, research scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Stanford Center for Human Rights and International Justice

    UN psychologists support the criminal investigation of ISIL

    United Nations clinical psychologists Nenna Ndukwe, Sarah Alcalay, and Chinedu Ezemokwe recently joined the Center for Human Rights and International Justice for a talk co-hosted with the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies entitled “Ensuring a Trauma-Informed Approach to Accountability for Crimes Committed by ISIL in Iraq," moderated by Daryn Reicherter, Director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program (HRTMHP) and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Time

    How Hypnosis Works, According to Science

    When you think about hypnosis, what do you visualize? For many, it’s a clock-swinging magician or a comedy act that forces an unwitting volunteer to make embarrassing public admissions on stage. But hypnosis has a surprisingly robust scientific framework. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Half Moon Bay Review - Coastside Magazine

    Stoked for Life

    Coastside Magazine covers the Stoked Lab and the related Stanford course "The Psychology of Stoked." Lab and course directors Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and, by courtesy, of pediatrics, are featured.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Investigating psychiatric illnesses of mass shooters

    Researchers recently published a study on the mental health of mass shooters in the United States, highlighting opportunities to improve mental health treatment as a way to prevent violence. Ira Glick, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • NACo

    allcove, the next step in youth mental health

    Santa Clara County, Calif. has taken a revolutionary new approach to caring for the mental health of its youth with the first-in-the-country integrated care center, which opened last year. The allcove center is designed for youth ages 12-25, who can walk in the door and speak to qualified professionals regardless of their ability to pay, referral status or other barriers. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • Stanford Magazine

    Brains and Heart

    Michelle Monje, professor of neurology and, by courtesy, of neurosurgery, of pediatrics, of pathology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this Stanford Magazine piece on how she harnesses passion and purpose as she works to cure a devastating childhood cancer.

  • WebMD

    Cancer Caregiving From Long Distance

    Cancer caregiving is never easy, and when you’re doing it long distance, there are extra challenges. Here’s what you can do to provide support. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience will combat neurodegeneration

    A new initiative on brain resilience will study the causes of cognitive decline – what may be done to prevent, delay, or reverse the decline – and what goes right for those who keep their cognitive abilities intact. Karl Deisseroth, D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Michael Greicius, Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are on the new initiative's steering committee.

  • KCBS Radio

    Fasting for Ramadan can be especially difficult for Muslims with eating disorders

    In the middle of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a time when Muslims traditionally fast from sunrise to sunset, an aspect of the holiday can be especially difficult for Muslims with eating disorders. For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Liz Saint John spoke to Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Washington Post

    Have trouble sleeping? Here’s how to snooze soundly.

    Experts point out ways you can solve bad habits, insomnia and other problems that keep you from getting decent shut-eye. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NY Times

    The Perils of Legalization

    NY Times answers a common reader question about the opioid crisis and legalizing drugs: Why not legalize and regulate drugs? Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment

  • Healthier, Happy Lives - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

    New Data Shows Emotional Abuse Increased Among Teens During Pandemic

    New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that over the last year of the pandemic, more than half of U.S. high school students (55%) reported they experienced emotional abuse by a parent or other adult in the home. Hilit Kletter, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides guidance on how to help teens who are experiencing emotional abuse and how to manage stress.

  • ESPN

    Gary Payton II has found a home in Golden State: 'They let me be me'

    Since he was diagnosed with dyslexia in second grade, Payton has learned to adapt in the face of adversity. Two decades later, Payton has found a home in Golden State thanks to the unique way he studies the game. Francesco Dandekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and associate director of sports psychiatry, is quoted.

  • AP NEWS

    For Muslims with eating disorders, Ramadan can pose dilemmas

    A time of worship, contemplation and joyous gatherings with family and friends, Ramadan is also a month when food plays a central role, from the ritual daytime fasting to celebratory iftar meals to break the fast. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KCBS Radio

    California awarded $15 million to upgrade suicide prevention hotline

    California has been awarded nearly $15 million from the American Rescue Plan as part of a Biden administration push to expand mental health resources around the country. The funds will go towards upgrading the suicide prevention hotline from a regular 10-digit phone number to the simpler 988 dialing code. KCBS Radio news anchor Megan Goldsby spoke with David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, in this interview.

  • Institute for Social Policy and Understanding

    Mental Health of Muslim Healthcare Workers

    Fielded during a national lockdown due to COVID-19, ISPU’s fifth annual poll showcases American Muslim perspectives within the context of their nation’s faith landscape. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is part of the team releasing this report.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    What's the difference between being an introvert and being shy? Experts explain

    Being an introvert isn’t the same thing as being shy. Here’s how to tell the difference, according to experts. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KPIX5 CBS News SF Bay Area

    Local Doctor Discusses Impact of Pandemic on Mental Health

    CBS News Bay Area morning anchor Amanda Starrantino talks to David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of adolescents.

  • Stanford Chemical Engineering

    Finding brain patterns underlying depression: linking functional neuroimaging to symptom subtypes

    As used in psychiatry today, the labels of depression and anxiety do little to tell us about the biological root of a person’s distress. What would a more precise psychiatry look like? Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, and Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured on this topic.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Teaching medical students how to prevent, treat addiction

    An addiction medicine curriculum at Stanford School of Medicine trains students to better understand causes of and treatments for substance use disorders. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • Los Altos Town Crier

    With latest fentanyl death, county considers how to effectively communicate risks

    Alongside the COVID-19 pandemic, another epidemic – similar in scale – continues to affect communities across the Bay Area. The crisis hit Los Altos and Mountain View last week when police announced an investigation into the distribution of fentanyl – a synthetic opioid – at Los Altos High School. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Well House builds student community around substance-free living

    The Well House is set to complete its first year as a substance-free house for undergraduate students at the end of spring quarter. Noel Vest, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Discover Magazine

    Can Strong Magnetic Pulses Cure Depression?

    A new accelerated brain stimulation treatment may help heal people suffering from mood disorders. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Time

    The Snuggle Is Real

    Stuffed comfort objects may help with anxiety, grief, memory loss, trauma, and more. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KPIX5 CBS News SF Bay Area

    Study Finds Lack Of Restful Slumber Has Bay Area Residents Sleepwalking Through Life

    The Alliance for Sleep conducted a major survey across the country finding that more than half of people with trouble sleeping feel frustrated and are desperate to find a solution that helps them get quality sleep and fully function the next day. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Nieman Lab

    Stories of resilience may be linked to lower suicide rates. Will media organizations listen?

    For media producers who are covering stories about suicide or suicidal ideation, a wealth of scientific literature shows that language and framing of these narratives have serious impacts. Vicki Harrison and Song Kim, leaders of the Media and Mental Health Initiative, are quoted in this article on the subject.

  • NPR.org

    Too much pleasure can lead to addiction. How to break the cycle and find balance

    In today's dopamine-filled world, here's how keep that balance in check. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • US House of Representatives

    Communities in Need: Legislation to Support Mental Health and Well-Being

    The Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Energy and Commerce held hearing on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 entitled, "Communities in Need: Legislation to Support Mental Health and Well-Being." Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provided testimony.

  • NY Times

    A Private War: Why PTSD Is Still Overlooked

    Experts say millions of people are affected by trauma, which has become a buzzword and a meme. So why aren’t more of them being treated? Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated), is quoted in this article.

  • Oregon Live

    Oregon decriminalized drugs in 2020: How’s it going?

    With Oregon being the first state in America to decriminalize possession of personal-use amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, LSD, oxycodone and other drugs, its program is being watched as a potential model for other states. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Wyoming Public Media

    Wyoming native advocates for juvenile support program to help kids before they face hurdles

    Wyoming has some of the highest juvenile incarceration rates in the country and some of the highest teen suicide rates as well. Such data has a lot of Wyomingites looking for outside-the-box solutions for helping kids before they face these hurdles. Jonathan Updike, resident in psychiatry, grew up in Wyoming and ended up at Stanford, working on an innovative program called allcove, which gets kids designing their own intervention strategies.

  • Stanford HAI

    New AI-Driven Algorithm Can Detect Autism in Brain “Fingerprints”

    Early, definitive detection of autism in patients could lead to timelier interventions and better outcomes. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article about a recent study.

  • VAntage Point

    Treatments for PTSD 4: Cognitive Processing Therapy

    In this episode of PTSD Bytes, host and clinical psychologist Pearl McGee-Vincent from the VA National Center for PTSD discusses cognitive processing therapy (CPT). Her guest is Dr. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, a clinical psychologist and implementation scientist at the National Center for PTSD and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • The Atlantic

    Why People Are Acting So Weird

    Crime, “unruly passenger” incidents, and other types of strange behavior have all soared recently. Why? More than a dozen experts on crime, psychology, and social norms recently walked the article author through a few possible explanations. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CA State Assembly/GoodforMEdia

    CA State Assembly Joint Hearing

    In this recent CA State Assembly joint hearing, Vicki Harrison and the GoodforMEdia team provided testimony for the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee on Protecting Kids Online: Challenges and Opportunities in a Digital World and offered advice for policymakers on how to improve online experiences for young people.

  • PBS Michiana WNIT

    Classroom WISE

    This news segment focuses on a training package developed through the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center School Mental Health Initiative, Classroom WISE. This free 3-part training package (online course, video library + resource collection, and website) assists K-12 educators in supporting the mental health of students in the classroom and offers evidence-based strategies and skills to engage and support students experiencing adversity and distress. Jessica Gonzalez, School Mental Health Coordinator in MHTTC and our department, is featured.

  • Religion News Service

    Fortitude through faith: The Muslim pandemic experience

    In March 2020, many mosques around the world were shut down for the first time in living history. For many Muslims, as with others, exhaustion is coupled with new, or newly intensified, mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression, trauma, substance use and suicidal ideation. In this article, Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses results of a survey of nearly 9,000 Muslims globally from the outset of the pandemic through the end of 2021.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Hyperexcitable arousal neurons drive sleep instability in old mice, study finds

    Researchers have identified a mechanism underlying fragmented sleep with older age, paving the way for potential drug therapies. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Neural network finds markers of autism, gender in brain scans

    A deep-learning method can detect autism’s “fingerprints” on a brain scan and predict a person’s social-communication difficulties, according to a new study. The tool can also spot brain features that distinguish the brains of men with autism from those of women with autism, according to another study from the same lab. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine GME Diversity Committee

    Congratulations! 2022 Stanford Match

    Stanford Medicine Office of Diversity in Medical Education invites you to join them in celebrating incoming 2022 Stanford Medicine GME Trainees! Roy Collins, resident in psychiatry, and Omar Sahak, fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, are featured in this welcome video.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Can melatonin gummies solve family bedtime struggles? Experts advise caution

    Parents have long wondered how to help kids sleep. The latest fad involves giving children melatonin-infused edibles, a trend that concerns some doctors. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Switching neurons on and off to probe autism circuits

    A 3D optogenetics method can mimic natural rhythms of neural activity, rendering previously unanswerable questions amenable to inquiry — including questions about autism. Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    S.F. is creating a treatment program for people in the criminal justice system. It’s located in an area that struggles with drugs and crime

    San Francisco is converting a vacant SoMa hotel into a transitional housing and treatment program for people involved in the criminal justice system who struggle with homelessness, mental illness and drug addiction - challenges that too often overlap in jail cells. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Medscape

    Navigating Patient Requests for an Emotional Support Animal

    Mental health professionals share advice on patients who may benefit from emotional support animals, and how to help them receive approval. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The American College of Psychiatrists

    Dr. James Lock receives the 2023 Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Psychiatry Award

    Congratulations to Dr. James Lock, recipient of The American College of Psychiatrists’ 2023 Award for Leadership in Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Psychiatry. This Award recognizes an individual who has made sustained and substantial contributions to child, adolescent and young adult mental health as evidenced by leadership in scholarly contributions, clinical service, education, and advocacy efforts. The Award will be presented during The College's Annual Meeting in February 2023.

  • The Sunday Long Read

    Spirit Matters

    On average, religious and spiritual people tend to experience better mental health, even in the midst of a pandemic. Find out why that might be in this article. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Neuroscience:Translate awards advance game-changing technologies

    The Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign are pleased to announce their fourth round of Neuroscience:Translate awards, which support teams of researchers collaborating across disciplinary boundaries in the neurosciences to develop practical solutions to address unmet clinical needs. Kim Bullock, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is among the awardees with co-PI Jeremy Bailenson for their project: "Extended reality (XR)-enhanced behavioral activation for treatment of major depressive disorder." Congratulations!

  • JAMA Medical News

    Gender Differences Seen in Brains of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    This JAMA Medical News feature describes new research that found gender differences in the brains of children with autism spectrum disorder. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • the Guardian

    My sleepy brain loves the sound of permanent daylight savings. But do scientists agree?

    Sleep-deprived Americans may be rejoicing this week, if they have the energy: it could be the last time daylight saving time kills a precious hour of snoozing. But those extra hours of evening light could come at a cost. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • American Muslim Today

    Muslim Community Hosts Mental Health Event at Wisconsin Library

    Religious discrimination and community stigma are two key reasons why Muslims are less likely to seek professional help when it comes to their mental health, experts said at a special program hosted by one Wisconsin library last weekend. The event provided several different mental health resources for different demographics. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the topic in this article.

  • Washington Post

    A year after the Atlanta shootings, Asian women live in fear: ‘How are we all going to stay safe?’

    Last year, attacks against Asian Americans soared, and one-third of the community reported fearing threats, physical attacks and violence. But for many Asian and Asian American women, the shootings on March 16, 2021 — in which eight people, including six Asian women, were fatally shot at three Atlanta-area spas — was an inflection point. Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the effects of the trauma.

  • NY Times

    How to Support a Child on the Transgender Spectrum

    As Texas’ governor attempts to criminalize medical treatments for transgender youth, experts say there are many ways to help adolescents who are questioning their gender. Jack Turban, postdoctoral scholar in child and adolescent psychiatry, provides comment.

  • The Mercury News

    Mental health: Bay Area teens grapple with cost, stigma and time

    Cases of teen anxiety and depression have risen with the pandemic, and school districts are scrambling to offer counseling and other support to students, staff and parents. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on teen mental health and related resources in this article.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    It’s 2022, but life may still feel ‘contaminated by fear.’ How to cope with perpetual pandemic fatigue

    Two years have passed since the Bay Area first imposed coronavirus shelter in place, but this is pandemic fatigue — which not only hasn’t faded, has been compounded by a parade of new concerns. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Report

    Meet Ruth O’Hara, the Faculty Senate’s 2021-22 chair

    Ruth O’Hara, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor at Stanford and is the director of Stanford Center for Clinical and Translational Research and Education (SPECTRUM), as well as the senior associate dean of research at the Stanford School of Medicine. In 2021, she was elected as chair of the Faculty Senate - more about that new role is featured in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Stanford doctor answers Daylight Saving Time and other sleep questions

    In a recent #AskMeAnything hosted by Stanford Medicine, sleep scientist and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Rafael Pelayo, answers questions posed to him on Instagram about sleep, dreams, Daylight Saving Time and more.

  • the Guardian

    America’s rush to normalcy has robbed us of the time to grieve our Covid losses

    We have lost a great deal within the last two years. The worldwide Covid death toll has surpassed 6 million lives. In the US, nearly a million people have succumbed to the virus – more than the number of people who died during the civil war. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • VAntage Point

    VA researcher, former White House policy advisor, leads panel recommending solutions to the opioid crisis

    In response to the soaring opioid addictions and deaths in the United States and Canada over the past 25 years, Stanford University and the British journal “The Lancet” collaborated to form a commission. The commission combined Stanford scholars with other leading experts in the U.S. and Canada, with the goal of better understanding the opioid crisis and proposing solutions to stop its spread domestically and internationally. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    Daylight saving time: How 'springing forward' affects your mind and body

    Daylight Saving Time starts at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 13, when we set the clocks forward and lose one hour of sleep. And while the centuries-old practice allows us to enjoy the sunlight more, it messes with our wellbeing. Why is "springing forward" so impactful? Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Federal government allows program to pay substance abusers for staying clean

    A new legal opinion from the Biden administration appears to clear the way for wider use of an underutilized harm reduction technique: paying people addicted to drugs for staying clean. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KQED

    Overdose Surge Sparks SF Debate Over Harm Reduction

    San Francisco has long embraced a philosophy of harm reduction in its drug treatment programs. But now the city is in the midst of a fentanyl-fueled overdose crisis, with more than 1300 deaths over two years. In response, some officials are questioning the effectiveness of the harm reduction model, calling for other options like abstinence-only treatment programs. In this podcast, guests discuss the history, science and politics of drug treatment in San Francisco. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Stanford Report

    Stanford Community Partnership Awards announced

    Stanford’s Office of Community Engagement announced the recipients of the 2022 Stanford Community Partnership Awards today. The awards recognize collaborative efforts between the university and organizations that tackle real-world problems and advance the public good. Congratulations to everyone involved with the allcove Integrated Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Programs!