News from the Department

Latest Stories & News Mentions

  • SELF

    The Definition of Trauma Is Evolving—Here’s How That Can Help Us Heal

    Recovery requires an individualized approach, experts say. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on telehealth and mobile apps. The digital well-being program "Pause a Moment" is also mentioned.

  • Newsy

    U.S. overdose deaths hit the highest level on record in 2021

    The CDC recently reported that U.S. overdose deaths hit the highest level on record in 2021 - up 15% from 2020 - a year where overdose deaths were already disproportionately high. And the covid pandemic is one of the factors contributing to deaths from drug overdoses in the U.S. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Fortune

    Psychedelic startups want to solve the mental health crisis

    Startups are creating psychedelic-based drugs to combat the global mental health crisis. But are we ready for a psychedelic sunrise? Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, participated in a panel on the subject recently at FORTUNE Brainstorm Health 2022, and provides comment.

  • HBO Docs Club Podcast

    HBO Docs Club

    The 2017 documentary "Mommy Dead and Dearest," is about the toxic dynamic between Dee Dee and Gypsy Rose Blanchard that ended in murder. In this episode, hosts Brittany and Ronald discuss the provocative documentary that began with a murder and uncovered a lifetime of deception, mental illness, and child abuse. Brittany and Ronald talk with expert Mary Sanders, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the psychology behind Munchhausen by proxy syndrome, and how it affected the dynamic in the Blanchard home.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Mental health hygiene can improve mood, decrease stress

    Creating a routine of mental health hygiene, including daily mindfulness practices, can decrease stress levels and improve mood. Hui Qi Tong, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Washington Post

    U.S. surpasses record 100,000 overdose deaths in 2021

    The number of overdose deaths is a 15 percent increase from the previous year. More than 1 million Americans have now died of drug overdoses in the 21st century, according to federal data released Wednesday. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the subject.

  • Sleep Review

    How Novel Insights From Autoscoring Could Change the Practice of Sleep Medicine

    Sleep study autoscoring is starting to go beyond simply calculating the apnea-hypopnea index and could shape the future of sleep medicine. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Mercury News

    California summer: Why drought makes us scared, edgy, angry

    Climate anxiety is real, according to a growing body of research showing that drought and hot weather are associated with stress, depression and even suicide. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Meet the parents who refuse to give their kids smartphones

    The vast majority of teens and tweens today have smartphones. These parents said no. Bradley Zicherman, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • EurekAlert!

    Almost 1 in 4 physicians experience workplace mistreatment, mostly from patients and visitors

    According to new research from Boston Medical Center and Stanford University School of Medicine, almost a quarter of physicians who responded to a survey at Stanford Medicine experienced workplace mistreatment, with patients and visitors being the most common source. Mickey Trockel, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center

    The many ways Stanford Medicine is responding to the opioid crisis

    At Stanford Medicine, programs to help patients struggling with substance-abuse disorders, research into addiction, and educational programs to increase awareness about addiction and treatment are aimed at reducing dependence on opioids.

  • Village News

    Stanford expert explains PTSD

    Most of us are familiar with the term PTSD – Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, but what many may not know is that a significant number of those affected with the condition have not sought help. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Evening Debrief

    Evening Debrief: Dr. Keith Humphreys for Newsy

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this segment on the opioid epidemic in America.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Can a monthly injection be the key to curbing addiction?

    Overdose deaths are rising in California, and physicians say anti-addiction medication holds tremendous potential. Why aren’t more patients getting it? Michael Ostacher, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford collaborates with local school districts to support mental health and well-being

    The Stanford Redwood City Sequoia School Mental Health Collaborative was established in 2020 as a research-practice partnership to support the Redwood City and Sequoia Union High School Districts in building capacity to understand and address the critical mental health needs of thousands of area students and their families. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine - 90 Seconds w/ Lisa Kim

    Tuning Out Mom's Voice

    Did you know that around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices? Lisa Kim talks to Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about this phenomenon.

  • Psychiatric News

    Special Report: What Is ‘Coordinated Specialty Care,’ and Why Is It Effective?

    Early intervention programs for people with psychosis or at high risk of psychosis have expanded rapidly. Coordinated Specialty Care is one model of care that has proven to be effective in reducing symptoms and improving patients’ quality of life. Katherine Eisen, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Kate Hardy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Douglas Noordsy, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Jacob Ballon, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, write on the subject in this Psychiatric News special report.

  • the Guardian

    Two weeks, no smartphone: how I tried – and failed – to kick my screen addiction

    James Ball spends countless hours a week staring at his iPhone. Would a fortnight with just old-school text messages and games of Snake shake him out of it? Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    The teen brain tunes in less to Mom’s voice, more to unfamiliar voices, study finds

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found. Study authors Daniel Abrams, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Percy Mistry, research scholar in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted.

  • Stanford Center for Human Rights and International Justice

    UN psychologists support the criminal investigation of ISIL

    United Nations clinical psychologists Nenna Ndukwe, Sarah Alcalay, and Chinedu Ezemokwe recently joined the Center for Human Rights and International Justice for a talk co-hosted with the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies entitled “Ensuring a Trauma-Informed Approach to Accountability for Crimes Committed by ISIL in Iraq," moderated by Daryn Reicherter, Director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Program (HRTMHP) and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Time

    How Hypnosis Works, According to Science

    When you think about hypnosis, what do you visualize? For many, it’s a clock-swinging magician or a comedy act that forces an unwitting volunteer to make embarrassing public admissions on stage. But hypnosis has a surprisingly robust scientific framework. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Half Moon Bay Review - Coastside Magazine

    Stoked for Life

    Coastside Magazine covers the Stoked Lab and the related Stanford course "The Psychology of Stoked." Lab and course directors Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and, by courtesy, of pediatrics, are featured.

  • Scope Blog - Stanford Medicine

    Investigating psychiatric illnesses of mass shooters

    Researchers recently published a study on the mental health of mass shooters in the United States, highlighting opportunities to improve mental health treatment as a way to prevent violence. Ira Glick, professor emeritus of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • NACo

    allcove, the next step in youth mental health

    Santa Clara County, Calif. has taken a revolutionary new approach to caring for the mental health of its youth with the first-in-the-country integrated care center, which opened last year. The allcove center is designed for youth ages 12-25, who can walk in the door and speak to qualified professionals regardless of their ability to pay, referral status or other barriers. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • Stanford Magazine

    Brains and Heart

    Michelle Monje, professor of neurology and, by courtesy, of neurosurgery, of pediatrics, of pathology and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this Stanford Magazine piece on how she harnesses passion and purpose as she works to cure a devastating childhood cancer.

  • WebMD

    Cancer Caregiving From Long Distance

    Cancer caregiving is never easy, and when you’re doing it long distance, there are extra challenges. Here’s what you can do to provide support. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford Knight Initiative for Brain Resilience will combat neurodegeneration

    A new initiative on brain resilience will study the causes of cognitive decline – what may be done to prevent, delay, or reverse the decline – and what goes right for those who keep their cognitive abilities intact. Karl Deisseroth, D.H. Chen Professor of Bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Michael Greicius, Iqbal Farrukh and Asad Jamal Professor and professor of neurology and neurological sciences and, by courtesy, of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are on the new initiative's steering committee.

  • KCBS Radio

    Fasting for Ramadan can be especially difficult for Muslims with eating disorders

    In the middle of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a time when Muslims traditionally fast from sunrise to sunset, an aspect of the holiday can be especially difficult for Muslims with eating disorders. For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Liz Saint John spoke to Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Washington Post

    Have trouble sleeping? Here’s how to snooze soundly.

    Experts point out ways you can solve bad habits, insomnia and other problems that keep you from getting decent shut-eye. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NY Times

    The Perils of Legalization

    NY Times answers a common reader question about the opioid crisis and legalizing drugs: Why not legalize and regulate drugs? Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment

  • Healthier, Happy Lives - Stanford Children’s Health Blog

    New Data Shows Emotional Abuse Increased Among Teens During Pandemic

    New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that over the last year of the pandemic, more than half of U.S. high school students (55%) reported they experienced emotional abuse by a parent or other adult in the home. Hilit Kletter, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides guidance on how to help teens who are experiencing emotional abuse and how to manage stress.

  • ESPN

    Gary Payton II has found a home in Golden State: 'They let me be me'

    Since he was diagnosed with dyslexia in second grade, Payton has learned to adapt in the face of adversity. Two decades later, Payton has found a home in Golden State thanks to the unique way he studies the game. Francesco Dandekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and associate director of sports psychiatry, is quoted.

  • AP NEWS

    For Muslims with eating disorders, Ramadan can pose dilemmas

    A time of worship, contemplation and joyous gatherings with family and friends, Ramadan is also a month when food plays a central role, from the ritual daytime fasting to celebratory iftar meals to break the fast. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KCBS Radio

    California awarded $15 million to upgrade suicide prevention hotline

    California has been awarded nearly $15 million from the American Rescue Plan as part of a Biden administration push to expand mental health resources around the country. The funds will go towards upgrading the suicide prevention hotline from a regular 10-digit phone number to the simpler 988 dialing code. KCBS Radio news anchor Megan Goldsby spoke with David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, in this interview.

  • Institute for Social Policy and Understanding

    Mental Health of Muslim Healthcare Workers

    Fielded during a national lockdown due to COVID-19, ISPU’s fifth annual poll showcases American Muslim perspectives within the context of their nation’s faith landscape. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is part of the team releasing this report.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    What's the difference between being an introvert and being shy? Experts explain

    Being an introvert isn’t the same thing as being shy. Here’s how to tell the difference, according to experts. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KPIX5 CBS News SF Bay Area

    Local Doctor Discusses Impact of Pandemic on Mental Health

    CBS News Bay Area morning anchor Amanda Starrantino talks to David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of adolescents.

  • Stanford Chemical Engineering

    Finding brain patterns underlying depression: linking functional neuroimaging to symptom subtypes

    As used in psychiatry today, the labels of depression and anxiety do little to tell us about the biological root of a person’s distress. What would a more precise psychiatry look like? Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, and Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured on this topic.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Teaching medical students how to prevent, treat addiction

    An addiction medicine curriculum at Stanford School of Medicine trains students to better understand causes of and treatments for substance use disorders. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are featured.

  • Los Altos Town Crier

    With latest fentanyl death, county considers how to effectively communicate risks

    Alongside the COVID-19 pandemic, another epidemic – similar in scale – continues to affect communities across the Bay Area. The crisis hit Los Altos and Mountain View last week when police announced an investigation into the distribution of fentanyl – a synthetic opioid – at Los Altos High School. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Well House builds student community around substance-free living

    The Well House is set to complete its first year as a substance-free house for undergraduate students at the end of spring quarter. Noel Vest, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Discover Magazine

    Can Strong Magnetic Pulses Cure Depression?

    A new accelerated brain stimulation treatment may help heal people suffering from mood disorders. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Time

    The Snuggle Is Real

    Stuffed comfort objects may help with anxiety, grief, memory loss, trauma, and more. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KPIX5 CBS News SF Bay Area

    Study Finds Lack Of Restful Slumber Has Bay Area Residents Sleepwalking Through Life

    The Alliance for Sleep conducted a major survey across the country finding that more than half of people with trouble sleeping feel frustrated and are desperate to find a solution that helps them get quality sleep and fully function the next day. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Nieman Lab

    Stories of resilience may be linked to lower suicide rates. Will media organizations listen?

    For media producers who are covering stories about suicide or suicidal ideation, a wealth of scientific literature shows that language and framing of these narratives have serious impacts. Vicki Harrison and Song Kim, leaders of the Media and Mental Health Initiative, are quoted in this article on the subject.

  • NPR.org

    Too much pleasure can lead to addiction. How to break the cycle and find balance

    In today's dopamine-filled world, here's how keep that balance in check. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • US House of Representatives

    Communities in Need: Legislation to Support Mental Health and Well-Being

    The Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Energy and Commerce held hearing on Tuesday, April 5, 2022 entitled, "Communities in Need: Legislation to Support Mental Health and Well-Being." Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provided testimony.

  • NY Times

    A Private War: Why PTSD Is Still Overlooked

    Experts say millions of people are affected by trauma, which has become a buzzword and a meme. So why aren’t more of them being treated? Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated), is quoted in this article.

  • Oregon Live

    Oregon decriminalized drugs in 2020: How’s it going?

    With Oregon being the first state in America to decriminalize possession of personal-use amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, LSD, oxycodone and other drugs, its program is being watched as a potential model for other states. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Wyoming Public Media

    Wyoming native advocates for juvenile support program to help kids before they face hurdles

    Wyoming has some of the highest juvenile incarceration rates in the country and some of the highest teen suicide rates as well. Such data has a lot of Wyomingites looking for outside-the-box solutions for helping kids before they face these hurdles. Jonathan Updike, resident in psychiatry, grew up in Wyoming and ended up at Stanford, working on an innovative program called allcove, which gets kids designing their own intervention strategies.

  • Stanford HAI

    New AI-Driven Algorithm Can Detect Autism in Brain “Fingerprints”

    Early, definitive detection of autism in patients could lead to timelier interventions and better outcomes. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article about a recent study.

  • VAntage Point

    Treatments for PTSD 4: Cognitive Processing Therapy

    In this episode of PTSD Bytes, host and clinical psychologist Pearl McGee-Vincent from the VA National Center for PTSD discusses cognitive processing therapy (CPT). Her guest is Dr. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, a clinical psychologist and implementation scientist at the National Center for PTSD and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • The Atlantic

    Why People Are Acting So Weird

    Crime, “unruly passenger” incidents, and other types of strange behavior have all soared recently. Why? More than a dozen experts on crime, psychology, and social norms recently walked the article author through a few possible explanations. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CA State Assembly/GoodforMEdia

    CA State Assembly Joint Hearing

    In this recent CA State Assembly joint hearing, Vicki Harrison and the GoodforMEdia team provided testimony for the Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee on Protecting Kids Online: Challenges and Opportunities in a Digital World and offered advice for policymakers on how to improve online experiences for young people.

  • PBS Michiana WNIT

    Classroom WISE

    This news segment focuses on a training package developed through the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center School Mental Health Initiative, Classroom WISE. This free 3-part training package (online course, video library + resource collection, and website) assists K-12 educators in supporting the mental health of students in the classroom and offers evidence-based strategies and skills to engage and support students experiencing adversity and distress. Jessica Gonzalez, School Mental Health Coordinator in MHTTC and our department, is featured.

  • Religion News Service

    Fortitude through faith: The Muslim pandemic experience

    In March 2020, many mosques around the world were shut down for the first time in living history. For many Muslims, as with others, exhaustion is coupled with new, or newly intensified, mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression, trauma, substance use and suicidal ideation. In this article, Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses results of a survey of nearly 9,000 Muslims globally from the outset of the pandemic through the end of 2021.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Hyperexcitable arousal neurons drive sleep instability in old mice, study finds

    Researchers have identified a mechanism underlying fragmented sleep with older age, paving the way for potential drug therapies. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Neural network finds markers of autism, gender in brain scans

    A deep-learning method can detect autism’s “fingerprints” on a brain scan and predict a person’s social-communication difficulties, according to a new study. The tool can also spot brain features that distinguish the brains of men with autism from those of women with autism, according to another study from the same lab. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medicine GME Diversity Committee

    Congratulations! 2022 Stanford Match

    Stanford Medicine Office of Diversity in Medical Education invites you to join them in celebrating incoming 2022 Stanford Medicine GME Trainees! Roy Collins, resident in psychiatry, and Omar Sahak, fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry, are featured in this welcome video.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Can melatonin gummies solve family bedtime struggles? Experts advise caution

    Parents have long wondered how to help kids sleep. The latest fad involves giving children melatonin-infused edibles, a trend that concerns some doctors. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Switching neurons on and off to probe autism circuits

    A 3D optogenetics method can mimic natural rhythms of neural activity, rendering previously unanswerable questions amenable to inquiry — including questions about autism. Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    S.F. is creating a treatment program for people in the criminal justice system. It’s located in an area that struggles with drugs and crime

    San Francisco is converting a vacant SoMa hotel into a transitional housing and treatment program for people involved in the criminal justice system who struggle with homelessness, mental illness and drug addiction - challenges that too often overlap in jail cells. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Medscape

    Navigating Patient Requests for an Emotional Support Animal

    Mental health professionals share advice on patients who may benefit from emotional support animals, and how to help them receive approval. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The American College of Psychiatrists

    Dr. James Lock receives the 2023 Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Psychiatry Award

    Congratulations to Dr. James Lock, recipient of The American College of Psychiatrists’ 2023 Award for Leadership in Child, Adolescent and Young Adult Psychiatry. This Award recognizes an individual who has made sustained and substantial contributions to child, adolescent and young adult mental health as evidenced by leadership in scholarly contributions, clinical service, education, and advocacy efforts. The Award will be presented during The College's Annual Meeting in February 2023.

  • The Sunday Long Read

    Spirit Matters

    On average, religious and spiritual people tend to experience better mental health, even in the midst of a pandemic. Find out why that might be in this article. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Neuroscience:Translate awards advance game-changing technologies

    The Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute and Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign are pleased to announce their fourth round of Neuroscience:Translate awards, which support teams of researchers collaborating across disciplinary boundaries in the neurosciences to develop practical solutions to address unmet clinical needs. Kim Bullock, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is among the awardees with co-PI Jeremy Bailenson for their project: "Extended reality (XR)-enhanced behavioral activation for treatment of major depressive disorder." Congratulations!

  • JAMA Medical News

    Gender Differences Seen in Brains of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    This JAMA Medical News feature describes new research that found gender differences in the brains of children with autism spectrum disorder. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • the Guardian

    My sleepy brain loves the sound of permanent daylight savings. But do scientists agree?

    Sleep-deprived Americans may be rejoicing this week, if they have the energy: it could be the last time daylight saving time kills a precious hour of snoozing. But those extra hours of evening light could come at a cost. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • American Muslim Today

    Muslim Community Hosts Mental Health Event at Wisconsin Library

    Religious discrimination and community stigma are two key reasons why Muslims are less likely to seek professional help when it comes to their mental health, experts said at a special program hosted by one Wisconsin library last weekend. The event provided several different mental health resources for different demographics. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted on the topic in this article.

  • Washington Post

    A year after the Atlanta shootings, Asian women live in fear: ‘How are we all going to stay safe?’

    Last year, attacks against Asian Americans soared, and one-third of the community reported fearing threats, physical attacks and violence. But for many Asian and Asian American women, the shootings on March 16, 2021 — in which eight people, including six Asian women, were fatally shot at three Atlanta-area spas — was an inflection point. Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the effects of the trauma.

  • NY Times

    How to Support a Child on the Transgender Spectrum

    As Texas’ governor attempts to criminalize medical treatments for transgender youth, experts say there are many ways to help adolescents who are questioning their gender. Jack Turban, postdoctoral scholar in child and adolescent psychiatry, provides comment.

  • The Mercury News

    Mental health: Bay Area teens grapple with cost, stigma and time

    Cases of teen anxiety and depression have risen with the pandemic, and school districts are scrambling to offer counseling and other support to students, staff and parents. Shashank Joshi, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on teen mental health and related resources in this article.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    It’s 2022, but life may still feel ‘contaminated by fear.’ How to cope with perpetual pandemic fatigue

    Two years have passed since the Bay Area first imposed coronavirus shelter in place, but this is pandemic fatigue — which not only hasn’t faded, has been compounded by a parade of new concerns. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Stanford Report

    Meet Ruth O’Hara, the Faculty Senate’s 2021-22 chair

    Ruth O’Hara, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor at Stanford and is the director of Stanford Center for Clinical and Translational Research and Education (SPECTRUM), as well as the senior associate dean of research at the Stanford School of Medicine. In 2021, she was elected as chair of the Faculty Senate - more about that new role is featured in this article.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Stanford doctor answers Daylight Saving Time and other sleep questions

    In a recent #AskMeAnything hosted by Stanford Medicine, sleep scientist and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Rafael Pelayo, answers questions posed to him on Instagram about sleep, dreams, Daylight Saving Time and more.

  • the Guardian

    America’s rush to normalcy has robbed us of the time to grieve our Covid losses

    We have lost a great deal within the last two years. The worldwide Covid death toll has surpassed 6 million lives. In the US, nearly a million people have succumbed to the virus – more than the number of people who died during the civil war. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • VAntage Point

    VA researcher, former White House policy advisor, leads panel recommending solutions to the opioid crisis

    In response to the soaring opioid addictions and deaths in the United States and Canada over the past 25 years, Stanford University and the British journal “The Lancet” collaborated to form a commission. The commission combined Stanford scholars with other leading experts in the U.S. and Canada, with the goal of better understanding the opioid crisis and proposing solutions to stop its spread domestically and internationally. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    Daylight saving time: How 'springing forward' affects your mind and body

    Daylight Saving Time starts at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 13, when we set the clocks forward and lose one hour of sleep. And while the centuries-old practice allows us to enjoy the sunlight more, it messes with our wellbeing. Why is "springing forward" so impactful? Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Federal government allows program to pay substance abusers for staying clean

    A new legal opinion from the Biden administration appears to clear the way for wider use of an underutilized harm reduction technique: paying people addicted to drugs for staying clean. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KQED

    Overdose Surge Sparks SF Debate Over Harm Reduction

    San Francisco has long embraced a philosophy of harm reduction in its drug treatment programs. But now the city is in the midst of a fentanyl-fueled overdose crisis, with more than 1300 deaths over two years. In response, some officials are questioning the effectiveness of the harm reduction model, calling for other options like abstinence-only treatment programs. In this podcast, guests discuss the history, science and politics of drug treatment in San Francisco. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Stanford Report

    Stanford Community Partnership Awards announced

    Stanford’s Office of Community Engagement announced the recipients of the 2022 Stanford Community Partnership Awards today. The awards recognize collaborative efforts between the university and organizations that tackle real-world problems and advance the public good. Congratulations to everyone involved with the allcove Integrated Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Programs!

  • HuffPost

    What Not To Say To Immunocompromised People Right Now

    As COVID mask mandates lift, many people who are immunocompromised are still fighting for their lives. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • KRON4

    Specialists weigh in on Gov. Newsom’s new plan to address mental health

    Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposal would provide people experiencing mental health and substance use disorders with services to get healthy. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Healthier, Happy Lives Blog | Stanford Children's Health

    How to Talk to Children About the Conflict in Ukraine

    A Stanford Children's Health psychiatrist provides advice on how parents can help their kids understand the conflict in Ukraine. Mari Kurahashi, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides guidance in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Study Intends to Find New Ways to Treat or Prevent Major Depression

    Investigators have launched a 3-year study to develop predictive models that will help identify better treatment plans for patients with depression. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned.

  • CBS News Bay Area

    Stanford Study: Differences in Brains of Boys & Girls with Autism

    CBS News Bay Area's Amanda Starrantino talked with Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, one of the co-authors of a new Stanford Medicine study that takes a look at differences in the brain between girls and boys with autism, and explains why autism symptoms differ between them.

  • Health Central

    Answers to Questions About Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Having metastatic breast cancer can be difficult to explain to friends and family. Here’s how to answer eight common questions about MBC. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides some tips in this series.

  • USA TODAY

    More Americans than ever are afraid of the dark, experts say. Here's why.

    Fears of the dark are common in kids and some adults are scared of darkness as well. Here's why. Are you afraid of the dark? How to conquer your fear. Mari Kurahashi, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Consumer Health News | HealthDay

    Medical Treatments for Trans Youth Cut Rates of Depression, Suicidal Thoughts

    Access to gender-affirming services cuts the odds of severe depression and maybe even suicide among transgender teens, a new study finds. Jack Turban, postdoctoral scholar in child and adolescent psychiatry, provides comment.

  • KQED

    Does my kid have a tech addiction? - MindShift

    For parents who need strategies for monitoring screen time, the new book "Dopamine Nation" by Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, breaks down the neuroscience behind why today’s kids are addicted to devices and strategies for limiting use.

  • Medical Daily

    Why Is It Harder To Sleep With Age? Blame These 'Hyperexcitable' Neurons

    In a new study, a team of researchers has shed light on how "hyperexcitable neurons" may be behind the sleep problem. Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral Sciences, is qutoed.

  • BNC News

    Unpacking the risks behind a winning culture

    Pressures behind winning the game at all costs culture is now taunting the sports world. Roy Collins, resident in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses societal pressures and mental health in the sports world in this BNC interview.

  • PBS NewsHour

    What two decades of data on overdose suicides shows about mental health care disparities

    Overall, rates of intentional overdose appeared to decline among U.S. women, but the aggregated numbers can obscure troubling increases within specific communities. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • TODAY

    I’m addicted to my phone. How can I cut back?

    I have my phone with me at all times and check it hundreds of times a day. Are there any proven ways to treat screen addiction? Our work, social lives and entertainment have become inextricably tied to our devices, and the pandemic has made matters worse. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Vancouver Sun

    Crucial talk of validity of opioid safe supply

    Safe supply advocates say providing prescription drugs would solve Canada's opioid overdose crisis. But Alberta policymakers ask for proof. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Study finds differences between brains of girls, boys with autism

    Girls with autism differ in several brain centers compared with boys with the disorder, suggesting gender-specific diagnostics are needed, a Stanford study using artificial intelligence found. Kaustubh Supekar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Vinod Menon, the Rachael L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted in this piece.

  • The New York Times

    A Rising Death Toll

    Overdoses are increasing at a troubling rate. Drug overdoses now kill more than 100,000 Americans a year — more than vehicle crash and gun deaths combined. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Stanford Medcast, Episode 34

    Youth Mental Health Matters

    This episode focuses on how the pandemic has impacted the mental health of children, adolescents and young adults. This episode addresses the lack of access, need for action, and signs and symptoms of mental health issues in young people. The role of community partnerships, the Surgeon General’s call for action and tips to help clinicians, schools and parents support young people are also discussed. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, is interviewed.

  • The New York Times

    Pedestrian Deaths Spike in U.S. as Reckless Driving Surges

    Fatalities are climbing to record levels two years into the pandemic. Authorities cite drivers’ anxiety levels, larger vehicles and fraying social norms. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Psychologists launch free, online emotional-wellness tool for health care workers

    Pause a Moment (PAM) is a web-based mental health education platform designed by Stanford Medicine psychologists. Designed to help health care workers learn and practice skills to cope with stress, anxiety, sadness, and other emotional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, PAM can be used by anyone, anywhere, even if you aren’t a health care worker.

  • USA TODAY

    Amid backlash from chronic pain sufferers, CDC drops hard thresholds from opioid guidance

    The CDC issued new guidance for prescribing opioids. The document does not include limits on pain pill doses and duration that were endorsed in 2016. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Yahoo!Life

    What does blacking out mean — and what happens to your body? Experts explain

    What, exactly, happens when you have memory loss from drinking too much alcohol? Sometimes, it's called a blackout. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the topic.

  • NPR.org

    An experimental depression treatment uses electric currents to bring relief

    The remedy is a new type of transcranial magnetic stimulation that's showing good results in just five days of treatment. For some patients, it's life-changing. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Report on opioids urges drug reform

    Stanford researchers and colleagues issue a report detailing issues of the opioid crisis, including insufficient government policies. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment about the report.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Stanford-Lancet report calls for sweeping reforms to mitigate opioid crisis

    The opioid epidemic is projected to claim 1.22 million U.S. lives this decade without new efforts to stem the crisis, according to a report that traces the roots of the problem and offers in-depth solutions. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Christine Timko, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provide an overview about the report in this article. Humphreys chairs the 17-member commission that produced the Stanford-funded report in coordination with The Lancet.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Stanford team finds benefits to online autism treatment

    In the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, Stanford Medicine researchers had to pause a study of autism treatment in preschoolers. The participants, young children with speech delays, had been coming to Stanford 12 hours a week for a therapy called pivotal response treatment, which uses autistic children's interests to motivate them to talk. Grace Gengoux, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Devon White, clinical research assessor, are interviewed.

  • SFist

    Open Drug Use at Breed’s Tenderloin Linkage Center Divides Addiction Experts

    Media reports confirm that people are allowed to use drugs at the Tenderloin Linkage Center, which some recovery experts applaud, and others say is “like trying to have an AA meeting in a bar.” Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Healthline

    Psychiatric Illness and Higher Death Risks

    Experts say there are many reasons why people with psychiatric conditions have higher risks of death from certain diseases. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Tradeoffs Podcast

    ‎Tradeoffs: Harm Reduction’s Road From Fringe to Federal Drug Policy on Apple Podcasts

    The overdose crisis in the U.S. is as deadly as it’s ever been. In response, the Biden administration is embracing a controversial strategy known as harm reduction, which seeks to keep drug users safe even as they continue using. This podcast explores how harm reduction has become more mainstream and what kind of impact we can expect it to have on the overdose crisis. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • AR/VR Magazine

    Wellness Gets A Virtual Makeover

    Virtual reality (VR) is on the rise again. While its initial peak occurred in the mid-1990s, today our society mentions ‘virtual reality‘ more than ever. Is this resurgence another trend, or are we officially opening the doors to alternate worlds for mass public access? Kim Bullock, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Newsweek

    Thousands debate societal addictions in viral thread

    A recent viral thread has spurred thousands of internet users to share their opinions about various societal addictions. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Mountain View Voice

    California counties look to replicate Santa Clara's youth mental health centers

    Last year, Santa Clara County tested the waters with an innovative way to connect troubled teens with mental health care, opening allcove clinics in Palo Alto and San Jose. Now other counties are looking to follow suit. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor and director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, provides comment.

  • El País

    Child psychiatrist Víctor G. Carrión: "It is a mistake to think that children cope better with crises: they are more vulnerable"

    Victor Carrion, vice chair and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on the stress of an unprocessed mourning and the most difficult situations for minors in the pandemic in this article.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Sex-typical behavior of mice guided by differences in brain’s gene activity

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurobiology, and Joseph Knoedler, postdoctoral scholar, are featured in this article.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Q&A: Reverse engineering the human brain by growing neural circuits in the lab

    Neuroscientists face a paradox. The field aims to understand the mysteries of the human mind, but studying the actual human brain cells and circuits that produce our mental lives—and how they go awry in neuropsychiatric disease—is incredibly challenging. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this piece.

  • Healio

    Quviviq improves sleep, daytime functioning in patients with insomnia

    Quviviq 25 mg and 50 mg enhanced sleep among patients with insomnia disorder, according to results of two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trials published in The Lancet Neurology. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor of Sleep Medicine in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, is featured.

  • WSJ

    The Once and Future Drug War

    During the 50 years the U.S. has battled the narcotics trade, illegal drugs have become more available and potent. But that’s no reason to give up. Governments must adapt and find answers beyond law enforcement. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Newsweek

    How to get more deep sleep to wake up refreshed

    Experts tell Newsweek that habits including journalling and cutting out caffeine after a certain time can help a person to have "wake up and feel great" rest. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Post

    Ten resources for better living in 2022

    Expert tips in mental health, tech and personal wellness to help you meet your goals this year. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • KQED

    New Frontiers in the Fight Against Depression

    When patients with severe depression don’t respond to medication, psychiatrists sometimes turn to a treatment known as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The non-invasive therapy uses pulses of magnetic activity to stimulate the brain, and about half of patients see their symptoms improve. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses recent findings in this interview.

  • Washington Post

    Federal website for rapid tests goes live a day early

    Some Americans are able to order free rapid coronavirus tests from a federal website ahead of its official launch, though critics point to issues with four-test limit. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Washington Post

    Not a morning person? A sunrise alarm clock could be the answer, experts say.

    There can be benefits to using sunrise alarm clocks, or dawn simulators, experts said. Here's what you need to know. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • After Cancer - Stanford Blog

    Caregiving during COVID: Stay connected with friends and family

    In the almost two years of the pandemic, we have heard about the needs of many types of caregivers-parents, health care providers, and teachers. For most of the pandemic, we have had limited data on the unique damage that the pandemic has caused for caregivers. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes on the topic in this blog post.

  • News Center - Stanford Medicine

    Better mental health found among transgender people who started hormones as teens

    Transgender adults who started gender-affirming hormone therapy as teens had better mental health than those who waited until adulthood or wanted the treatment but never received it, a Stanford-led study found. Jack Turban, postdoctoral scholar in child and adolescent psychiatry and lead author on the article, is quoted throughout.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    Why we hold onto things we don’t need — and how to let them go, according to experts

    Letting go of stuff, even if you no longer need or use it, can be hard. Here's how to make it easier, according to experts. Carolyn Rodriguez, the director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    When it comes to legal cannabis, Canada's doing it right

    If U.S. policymakers want to better prioritize public health while legalizing cannabis, they should look to Canada's model for ideas, according to a new research report funded by Stanford University. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, commissioned the report in his role as co-director of the Stanford Network on Addiction Policy, in an effort to more closely examine Canada's efforts to control marketing of the drug, its use of government-run cannabis retail stores and efforts to reduce youth access to better prevent harmful drug use.

  • Medical News Today

    Ketamine may relieve depression and other mental health issues

    A new review of ketamine research finds that the dissociative drug may provide rapid relief from depression and thoughts of suicide. Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • rTMS as a treatment for Veterans with cognitive impairment and multiple co

    rTMS as a treatment for Veterans with cognitive impairment and multiple co-morbidities

    Current treatments for Alzheimer's disease are of limited effectiveness and do not halt the progression of the disease and associated cognitive decline. A recent study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, showed that a novel treatment, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), may have the potential of improving the memory function in Veterans with cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease. Jerome Yesavage, Jared and Mae Tinklenberg professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and professor, by courtesy, of neurology, and J. Kaci Fairchild, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are mentioned in this piece, and several faculty in the department co-authored the study article.

  • The Stanford Daily

    Stanford professors back CA restrictions on weight loss supplements

    California legislators will vote on a bill to prohibit the sale of dietary supplements for weight loss and diet pills to anyone under the age of 18 in a move that could patch what Stanford professors are calling severe under-regulation in the diet pill industry. Eric Stice, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • APA Psychiatric News

    Special Report: Ethical Decision-Making in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice—An Evolving Challenge

    Psychiatrists regularly confront both age-old and new questions in their practice, from those that involve the cornerstone values of beneficence and respect to those that involve the cutting edge of technological innovation. Laura Roberts, Chair and Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Gabriel Termuehlen, co-editor, provide an overview of the second edition of "Professionalism and Ethics, Second Edition: Q & A Self-Study Guide for Mental Health Professionals" in this special report.

  • POPSUGAR Fitness

    If You're a Chronic Night Owl, You Might Have Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome occurs when your sleep schedule is set later than normal, so you fall asleep and wake up later. It's a treatable condition. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article.

  • Psychiatric News

    Neurodiversity and Opportunities in Psychiatry

    Neurodiversity is about acknowledging that the brain of each person is developed uniquely, resulting in differences in abilities and behavioral traits among all people. When we explore the significance of neurodiversity in psychiatry, we have found that people with various neurodiverse conditions such as autism have characteristics that can be manifested as both strengths and challenges. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides an overview of the concepts from the new book: "Neurodiversity: From Phenomenology to Neurobiology and Enhancing Technologies" in this article.

  • Medscape

    Lithium Works for Bipolar Disorder. Why Aren't We Using It?

    Despite its proven efficacy and safety, clinicians continue to move away from lithium. Michael Ostacher, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, joins Dr. Stephen Strakowski and Dr. Kay Jamison to discuss the topic in this Medscape video.

  • Independent Women's Forum

    Is our addiction to pleasure destroying us?

    Why are Americans in such pain? The answer, it seems, is that we have more access to pleasure than ever before. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article about her book, "Dopamine Nation."

  • Mashable India

    Why You Shouldn't Try To Go Viral In 2022

    Science warns of the dopamine addiction that comes with seeking social media approval. This year, can we just not? Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article on what happens when social media goes viral.

  • Texas News Today

    Is Antonio Brown's Meltdown Seeking Mental Health Help?

    It’s complicated. From tennis superstar Naomi Osaka to Olympic gymnast Simone Biles, elite athletes have sparked a global debate about mental health, but last Sunday, Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Antonio Brown was the first. Lisa Post, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Muslim Network TV

    Suicide crisis in Muslim communities

    Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this news segment and provides an overview of the public health crisis and the related work of the Muslim Mental Health and Islamic Psychology Lab.

  • BuzzFeed News

    Jail Time For An “Imaginary Crime”: It’s Almost Impossible To Overdose Just By Touching Fentanyl, But People Are Being Locked Up For It Anyway

    The prevalence of accidental overdose has increased along with the amount of fentanyl in the illicit drug supply in the United States, and along with it, serious legal implications. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • PR Newswire

    Sleep Health Journal Article Highlights Importance of Later School Start Times for Adolescent Health

    The latest article published in the National Sleep Foundation's (NSF) Sleep Health Journal highlights the importance of later school start times for adolescents. The article, co-authored by Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, highlights key outcomes from the Summit on Adolescent Sleep and School Start Times held in January 2021 and hosted by Stanford University School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. National Sleep Foundation supported the Summit, along with other sleep organizations and universities.

  • USA TODAY

    Muslims face a suicide crisis in America. The taboo of talking about it must end.

    Muslim communities seem to be waking up to the reality of mental illness and the acute need to address it. Rania Awaad, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, coauthors this opinion piece on USA Today.

  • Psychiatric News

    New Stanford Protocol for TMS Found to Achieve Fast Remission

    A TMS protocol that can be done in five days has shown remarkable efficacy in people with treatment-resistant depression and may be particularly valuable in inpatient settings with limited bed space. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides an overview in this article.

  • NBC Bay Area

    All the Rage: New San Francisco ‘Smash Room' is a Break From Holiday Stress

    It’s a smash hit with stressed-out shoppers, who say they love it to pieces: a basement business where they can take refuge from the mall and unleash their aggression on old furniture, electronics and dishes. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • The Sydney Morning Herald

    The wellbeing articles that changed us in 2021

    Of the hundreds of health and wellness articles we have published this year, these are the ones that hit home more than others: from the myth of 10,000 steps to the benefits of reduced drinking. The author mentions an article about our collective addiction to dopamine where Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Mass News

    Synthetic Alcohol Promises to Make Drinking Safer. But Experts Are Wary

    Imagine if you could have the buzz from a drink but not the negative side effects. That’s the marketing hype bubbling up from startups around the world making beverages that promise to make you feel tipsy using the magic of plant extracts, not alcohol. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • NBC Bay Area

    Tips on Handling the Holiday Blues

    As the holiday juggernaut barrels along, it’s not unusual to start feeling stressed or even depressed on the days that are supposed to be the happiest of the year. Such feelings are nothing to be ashamed of, according to health professionals. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Mind Body Green

    Most Jet Lag Advice Doesn't Work: Here's Why + What To Do On Your Next Flight

    Nothing derails a trip like jet lag—especially if you have limited time in your destination or need to be on your game upon landing. So is there any way we can skip over the travel woe? Yes and no. According to circadian rhythm specialists, jet lag is more nuanced than we give it credit for. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Presentation: Improvement of Narcolepsy Symptoms with Once-Nightly Sodium Oxybate

    Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the results of a phase 3 clinical trial that examined once-nightly sodium oxybate in patients with narcolepsy.

  • Justice Rapid Response

    ASP event: ICC Prosecutor commits to put policy into action on justice for children

    Prosecutor Karim Asad Ahmad Khan QC reaffirmed his commitment to making access to justice for children – through concrete actions – a high priority of his mandate at the International Criminal Court (ICC), during the recent event ‘Moving forward: Enabling a child-centred approach at the ICC and beyond’ held by Justice Rapid Response and Save the Children. Daryn Reicherter, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted from the event in this article.

  • CryptoNews

    Learn to Control Your Own Mind or Get Lost in the Metaverse

    In this episode, Jay Martin of Cambridge House interviews Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. Listen to the recording as they discuss the growing problem of addiction in the modern world, how to navigate overabundance, and how the metaverse will be 'reality' for many.

  • Seeker Baby

    Why Can’t I Get My Baby to Sleep Like a Baby?

    Wondering how to help your baby stop crying and start sleeping? Come find out alongside Angel Laketa Moore as she speaks with Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about why healthy sleep habits are so important to cultivate early on.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Designing psychiatric care to precisely match patients' biology

    Using a new approach that harnesses the power of precision, Stanford Medicine researchers are devising new ways to treat depression. Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this post.

  • CBS Local San Francisco

    Residents Skeptical of San Francisco Mayor's Pledge to Get Drugs, Crime Out of Tenderloin

    By now, most San Franciscans have probably heard Mayor London Breed's pledge to crack down on crime in the city. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • KCBS

    Parent Praise Is Key For Making Life Lessons Stick

    A new study looked at the importance of parent praise when it comes to kids learning how--and how long--to brush their teeth. That research could offer insights on how kids learn to persist when it comes to other more difficult tasks. For more, KCBS Radio news anchor Rebecca Corral spoke with David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • KQED

    'It Saved My Life': Depression Treatment Is Turning Lives Around in Five Days

    A new type of brain stimulation is being used to treat people with depression, with promising results: In five days or fewer, almost 80% of patients were symptom-free. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Brain Stimulation Lab are featured in this article.

  • AARP

    Products to Help Combat Seasonal Affective Disorder​

    Lack of light can negatively impact those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder. Products like sunrise alarm clocks and daylight bulbs can help.​ Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article.

  • PBS NewsHour

    Do safe drug consumption sites save lives? Here's what we know about NYC's new venture

    Since last spring, more than 100,000 Americans have died of drug overdoses — many caused by the opioid, fentanyl. Officials are searching for solutions to try to save lives, including setting up authorized centers where people can use illegal drugs under supervision. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this coverage.

  • NPR

    You don't have to drink to celebrate the holiday season

    If you think alcohol is problematic for you, or want to avoid drinking too much, or just aren't the biggest drinker, here are some strategies for navigating end-of-year celebrations. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Good Housekeeping

    Find Out If You’re Affected By "Revenge Bedtime Procrastination" and How to Stop It

    Are you sabotaging your own sleep routine in order to get back more person time? If so, it could be harmful to your overall health. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this piece.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    'It's endangering all of us': Experts link reckless driving to pandemic as car crash deaths surge

    Driving under the influence, speeding and driving without a seatbelt are examples of reckless behavior that safety experts have linked to the pandemic. They believe those actions have led to a surge in car crash fatalities. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Earth.com

    Young children appreciate humor in the same brain region as adults

    Humor is a universal human feature that relies on a cognitive process allowing us to perceive things as funny, and then to laugh about them. A recent publication co-authored by Naama Mayseles, postdoctoral fellow, and Allan Reiss, Howard C. Robbins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, is featured in this article.

  • ABC7 San Francisco

    'An emergency': Surgeon General raises alarm, issues rare advisory over youth mental health

    The country's top physician is putting focus on the mental health of young people, especially during the on-going pandemic -- too many children are struggling, as seen in a rise in suicide rates and much more- the reason behind a rare public advisory on youth mental health. Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing are featured.

  • KQED

    Half Moon Bay's 'Big Wave' Community Welcomes Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities | KQED

    For parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the need to have solid plans in place for their children's care runs deep. Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and his work with the Stanford Neurodiversity Project, are featured in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Instagram is touting safety features for teens. Mental health advocates aren’t buying it.

    The changes come one day before its CEO testifies before Congress about the app’s impact on young people. Vicki Harrison, program director for the Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing at Stanford University, talk about “doom scroll” and how Instagram’s new features may help address some of these concerns.

  • US News and World Report

    How Yoga and Exercise Help With Addiction Recovery

    Certain types of yoga can produce a natural "high" that can help those recovering from addiction. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times

    Recognizing and Addressing Psychiatric Implications of Sleep Disorders

    Sleep disturbance often co-occurs among older adults with psychiatric symptoms and disorders. A thorough assessment, looking at difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep, daytime sleepiness/dysfunction, and other physical markers (eg, snoring), will help providers identify the presence of sleep disorders, such as OSA or chronic insomnia, that co-occur with psychiatric conditions. Treatment with evidenced-based methods is essential to improving their symptoms, quality of life, and brain health. Drs Juang, Mills-Finnerty, Cassidy-Eagle, Kawai, and Gould coauthor this article in Psychiatric Times' Special Report: Geriatric Psychiatry.

  • Psychiatric News

    A Psychiatrist’s Journey Through Community Suicide Contagion: How Media Can Make A Difference

    Steven Adelsheim, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes, “For psychiatrists, it is a critical professional responsibility to educate our media partners about the risk of suicide contagion and encourage journalists to follow the reporting recommendations to help save lives.”

  • Washington Post

    Your brain on wine, milkshakes and kale juice

    Our brains can build up a tolerance to certain foods. In particular, if we eat a lot of foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt, like processed foods, our brains don't experience as much pleasure when we eat them. This makes us more likely to overeat things that aren't good for us. Food and mental health reporter Mary Beth Albright joined Eric Stice, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, to explore the subject.

  • Healio

    APA calls for action to address high number of overdose deaths

    In light of recent CDC data showing more than 100,000 U.S. deaths from overdoses between April 2020 and April 2021, the American Psychiatric Association reviewed effective substance abuse treatments and called for efforts to intervene. These data continue to highlight the alarming trend of increasing overdose deaths in the U.S. Smita Das, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chair of APA’s Council on Addiction Psychiatry, provides comment.

  • The Scientist Magazine

    DNA Damage Makes Zebrafish Sleepy

    Buildup of a DNA-repair protein in brain cells spurs shut-eye in the fish, a study finds, and similar results in mice suggest the mechanism is widespread in animals. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Science

    Next generation of deep brain stimulation aims to tackle depression

    For patients whose depression resists treatment with drugs and electroconvulsive therapy, surgically implanted wires that stimulate the brain might bring relief. But in recent years, two randomized, controlled trials of this approach, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), were halted after underwhelming results in interim analyses. Long-term follow-up of participants, however, has revived some optimism. Mahendra Bhati, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of neurosurgery, is quoted.

  • One Mind

    Brain Waves: Medicinal Psychedelics with Brandon Staglin and Dr. Robert Malenka

    Psychedelic interventions make up one of the fastest growing areas of medical research — but how effective are they for treating a variety of mental health conditions? In this Brain Waves™ episode, Host and One Mind President Brandon Staglin sits down with Robert Malenka, Pritzker Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Deputy Director of the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute at Stanford University, to discuss the science behind medicinal psychedelics.

  • Medscape

    Intranasal Oxytocin for Autism Promising ― Then Came the Data

    The off-label use of intranasal oxytocin to improve social functioning in children with autism has become widespread. Now, the largest trial to date finds this off-label treatment doesn’t work. What’s next? Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • NPR.org

    Americans can wait many weeks to see a therapist. California law aims to fix that.

    Many Americans with mental illness report waiting weeks for care, even for serious depression or suicidality. Now California has a new law for insurers, limiting those wait times to two weeks or less. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Brain’s sensory switchboard has complex connections to autism

    An atypical thalamus may underlie not only sensory issues in autism but also difficulties with social skills, attention and memory. Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • KPIX CBS News Bay Area

    Opioid Overdose Deaths Soar Nationwide

    While San Francisco's overdose deaths are on pace to decline this year, the opioid crisis continues to rage across the country, with overdose deaths up 20%. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed in this news feature.

  • ABC News

    Astroworld concertgoer who tried to stop performance recounts traumatic event

    Astroworld concertgoers may experience trauma and need emotional healing following the concert chaos. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted throughout this article.

  • Teen Vogue

    Social Media Isn't Just Addictive — It's Addictive By Design

    We’ve seen studies for years telling us that social media can be bad for our mental health, but more than likely, we didn’t really need research to know that. Many of us have experienced the mental drain that comes with scrolling endlessly through social media — and worse, feeling like we can’t stop even when it’s noticeably bringing us down. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Business Wire

    $3 Million Federal Grant to Study Groundbreaking Treatment for PTSD

    Talkspace announced a $3 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to study the effectiveness of Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) – a well-established treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – in a virtual setting. As millions of Americans – including veterans, sexual assault survivors, and others – continue to battle PTSD and other trauma related challenges, this research seeks to explore and unlock the potential of delivering CPT through digital channels, with the goal of dramatically expanding access to care for those most in need. Shannon Wiltsey Stirman, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral services, will co-lead the study in conjunction with Talkspace and a colleague at UT Health San Antonio.

  • APA Publishing

    Psychiatry Unbound Podcast: Neurodiversity

    Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses his new book "Neurodiversity: From Phenomenology to Neurobiology and Enhancing Technologies" with Laura Roberts, professor and chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, to explore this fascinating new area. Because the field is in its infancy, there are few authoritative resources for clinicians and educators who wish to understand their neurodiverse patients and students. Dr. Fung and Dr. Roberts provide real-life examples of Neurodiversity in our world.

  • San Francisco Chronicle

    Here's why people with depression and mood disorders now qualify for COVID booster shots

    Millions of people who experience mental illnesses such as depression and schizophrenia are now eligible for COVID booster shots. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention added mood disorders to the eligibility criteria in October, a step seen by experts as an important addition that recognizes the linkage between mental and physical health, a connection too often overlooked by the public. David Spiegel, Willson Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Yahoo News/USA Today

    Going to a concert shouldn't be scary. What to do when it is.

    After Astroworld, going to a concert might be too overwhelmingly scary even for the most enthusiastic fans. Here's how to cope. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    U.S. overdose deaths are soaring. Biden’s new plan could help ease the crisis.

    Secretary of Health and Human Services Xavier Becerra has rolled out a four-part plan that includes measures to prevent drug addiction by cracking down on inappropriate prescribing of opioids and to curb drug overdoses by emphasizing harm reduction techniques. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Psychiatric Times - APA

    Nurturing Cultural Humility in Mental Health Care

    How can cultural humility in therapeutic settings improve patient outcomes? Rona Hu, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, presented on the topic with colleague, Dr. Napoleon Higgins, at the 2021 Neuroscience Education Institute Congress. In the presentation, Higgins and Hu discussed the impact of history on current mental health care outcomes; the effects of racism on mental health; the ways oppression, racism, access barriers, and other sociocultural factors lead to health disparities and mental health sequelae; and the importance of cultural humility in mental health care settings.

  • National Center for Youth Law

    Guidance for mental health professionals serving unaccompanied children released from government custody

    This new downloadable guidance is intended to support mental health providers in effectively serving unaccompanied children released from federal immigration custody. Developed by children’s rights attorneys and mental health experts on trauma and immigration from the Stanford Early Life Stress and Resilience Program, the National Center for Youth Law, and the Center for Trauma Recovery & Juvenile Justice, this Guide provides context on the distinctive experiences unaccompanied children carry with them and offers guidance on how to meet the therapeutic needs of these children.

  • Washington Post

    4 ways that older people can bolster or improve their mental health

    Resilience among older people has been attributed to their ability to better regulate emotions, higher acceptance of the ups and downs of life, and wisdom that comes from having learned to see the big picture. But old age brings many challenges that can harm mental health. Irvin Yalom, emeritus professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • CBS News

    SAINT: Hope for new treatment of depression

    A new experimental treatment using a fast-acting approach with targeted magnetic stimulation of the brain, called Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy, has achieved significant success in trials. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this piece about the study.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Stanford program matches neurodiverse job seekers with employers

    Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this article about the Stanford Neurodiversity at Work program, a research project based on the philosophy that neurodiverse individuals, such as those with autism or ADHD, have brain differences that are normal, rather than deficits — and can be advantageous in the workplace.

  • The New York Times

    The Ketamine Cure

    The once-taboo drug has been repurposed to treat depression and is even available for delivery. But how safe is it? Carolyn Rodriguez, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Washington Post

    How to choose the best sleeping position, and why it matters

    While the position you fall asleep in is just one piece of the sleep hygiene puzzle, experts said it can be key to getting quality rest. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • CNN

    Why people keep scrolling when they say they are done with Facebook

    The tides are turning against Facebook. But no matter how much they may want to, some people just can't seem to break away. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Reviewed

    Everything you need to know about sleep and daylight saving

    Falling forward and springing back are the bane of some people's existence. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed on the subject in this article.

  • Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

    Karl Deisseroth: Lighting up The Brain

    With the invention of new ways to explore the brain, Karl Deisseroth, professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, has revolutionized neuroscience. Deisseroth is interviewed about his work in this podcast episode with Alan Alda.

  • Scope - Stanford Medicine Blog

    Addictive potential of social media, explained

    The curious title of the book, "Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence," pays tribute to the crucial and often destructive role that dopamine plays in modern society. Anna Lembke, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, the book's author, is featured in this Q&A.

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Depression treatment devised at Stanford is nearly 80% effective in controlled study

    In a double-blind controlled study, high doses of magnetic brain stimulation, given on an accelerated timeline and individually targeted, caused remission in 79% of trial participants with severe depression. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Alan Schatzberg, the Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are quoted about the study in this article.

  • Science

    ‘If it’s alive, it sleeps.’ Brainless creatures shed light on why we slumber

    Evidence from evolutionarily ancient creatures is revealing that sleep is not just for the brain. This article includes a feature about Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who is developing a way to watch the organ feedback process play out cell by cell in the thumbnail-size, transparent fish Danionella translucida.

  • Psychiatric News | APA

    New TMS Protocol Turns Six Weeks of Treatment Into One

    Intermittent theta-burst stimulation, recently approved by the FDA for treatment-resistant depression, has significantly shortened the duration of repetitive TMS treatment sessions from 30 minutes to three minutes. Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted about the study in this article.

  • APA Services, Inc.

    Psychological scientists rally for psychological research on Capitol Hill

    Thirteen psychologists joined more than 450 advocates urging Congress to provide robust, predictable, and sustained funding for NIH in fiscal year 2022. Victoria Cosgrove, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, attended the annual Rally for Medical Research Hill Day.

  • SELF

    Here's What It Really Means to Be Diagnosed With Bipolar Disorder

    Receiving or pursuing a bipolar disorder diagnosis is a brave step. Understanding what you may be experiencing is the first step to finding the support you need to feel like yourself again. The first thing to know: You’re not alone. An estimated 4.4% of American adults experience bipolar disorder at some point in their lives, according to the National Institute of Health. Po Wang, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Washington Post

    HHS pledges more effort, resources toward harm reduction for drug users

    With overdose deaths soaring toward 100,000 annually, Secretary Xavier Becerra outlined government policy to keep drug users alive and healthy until they are ready to seek treatment. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Cancer Therapy Advisor

    PTSD in Cancer Patients: What Providers Need to Know

    Experts outline risk factors for PTSD and explain how PTSD can affect cancer outcomes. Sheila Lahijani, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.