News from the Department

Latest Stories & News Mentions

  • Medium

    Infosec Engineers Are Suffering to Keep Us Safe

    A growing industry concern over mental burnout is leading engineers to seek out healthier work environments. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • HuffPost

    8 Wellness Trends We'd Like To Leave Behind In 2019

    The article looks at wellness trends of 2019 that are full of unsubstantiated promises and dangerous side effects. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.

  • California Children's Hospital Association

    California Children's Hospital Association Releases Behavioral Health White Paper

    Half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14 and three-quarters begin by age 24. In other words, mental illness is a disease of youth — one with profound long-term implications for children, their families and their communities. California’s children’s hospitals – and, especially, emergency departments – serve an increasing number of youth in crisis every year. To learn more about CCHA’s recommendations, including allcove, a special initiative of the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, read the white paper, “Improving Behavioral Health Care for Children in California: A Call to Action.”

  • Stanford Medicine News Center

    Brain function irregular in children with Type 1 diabetes, study says

    The default mode network, which controls the brain at rest, does not switch off in children with Type 1 diabetes when they focus on a task, a study led by Stanford scientists has shown. Bruce Buckingham, professor emeritus of pediatrics, and Lara Foland-Ross, a senior research associate at the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research at Stanford, share lead authorship, and Allan Reiss, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author.

  • Meditation Studio

    Dr. Manpreet Singh - The prescription for resilience. How to overcome life's obstacles

    Ever wonder why some people thrive in the face of adversity? It turns out that skill is teachable. In this episode of Untangle, Dr. Manpreet Singh teaches us 10 things you can do to build resilience in your life.

  • Medscape

    Not All Problem Drinkers May Need Abstinence

    In this article, Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides input on how moderation may be more effective than abstinence from alcohol to treat unhealthy drinking habits.

  • CBSN Bay Area

    CBSN Bay Area

    In this edition of Medical Monday, Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Clinic, discusses how to avoid overindulging in alcohol during the holiday season and setting healthy drinking limits.

  • HuffPost

    Therapists Say You Can Be 'Addicted' To Shopping. Here's How.

    Some researchers want buying-shopping disorder, in which people overshop to the point where it negatively affects their life, to be classified as a legitimate mental illness. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Stanford Impulse Disorders Clinic, is quoted in this article.

  • NPR.org

    Seeing Monsters? It Could Be The Nightmare Of Sleep Paralysis

    This podcast explored the signs and symptoms of sleep paralysis and ways to treat it. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Chief of the Division of Sleep Medicine, was featured.

  • Medium

    It’s Not the Turkey That Makes You Tired

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why people feel tired after eating a hearty Thanksgiving dinner.

  • The Paper Gown

    What to Know Before Seeing a New Psychiatrist

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial professor and a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides tips on what patients should do before seeing a psychiatrist for the first time or switching to a new provider.

  • HuffPost

    Here's What Happens To Your Body When You Overthink

    David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health, explains how excessive worrying or overthinking can take a mental and physical toll on your body in this article.

  • Washington Post

    Yes, marijuana has a gateway effect. But so do most addictive substances.

    Gateways between marijuana and other addictive substances are real — and they swing in both directions, writes Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, in this opinion piece.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Spotlight: The Long and Vital Reach of the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network

    This Spotlight piece highlights the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center Network (MHTTC) coordinating office, run by Drs. Mark McGovern and Heather Gotham and their team from Stanford.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    What you need to know about intermittent fasting — and who should avoid it

    Sarah Adler, clinical assistant professor psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the different methods of intermittent fasting and pros and cons of the popular weight loss trend.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Eight members of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences are among the world's most highly cited researchers in 2019

    We are thrilled to celebrate faculty members and trainees in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences who have been included in Clarivate Analytics Web of Science's 2019 Highly Cited Researcher’s list – a testament to the ongoing breadth, scope and impact of their work.

  • Medium

    A Brief Guide to the Reasons You’re Always Tired

    David Spiegel, the Jack, Samuel and Lulu Willson Professor and director of the Stanford Center on Stress and Health, is interviewed about the possible causes for ongoing fatigue, and how it could be a sign of a more serious medical problem.

  • NY Times

    Will Science Ever Give Us a Better Night’s Sleep?

    This piece focuses on how scientists are working to unravel the mysteries of sleep. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Chief of the Division of Sleep Medicine, provides comment here.

  • Spry Health

    Recognizing and addressing caregiver burnout

    Between 40 and 70 percent of caregivers report depression, and between 11 and 23 percent report that caregiving has negatively impacted their physical health as well. But physicians who know the risks are in a unique position to offer support and resources to their patients’ caregivers. Ranak Trivedi, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • Health Central

    Bipolar Disorder: Signs, Symptoms, Causes, Treatment and more

    Po Wang, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and clinic chief of the Bipolar Disorders Clinic, discusses the symptoms and treatment of bipolar disorder in this article.

  • Fast Company

    Every social media company should copy Pinterest’s newest feature

    The platform continues to demonstrate that treating users like people doesn’t have to be so hard. Stanford experts from the “Brainstorm” lab, who worked with Pinterest on the tools, are mentioned here.

  • Scope

    How estrogen cycles change female mice's (and possibly people's) brains, governing sexual receptivity

    A discovery about how a neural circuit located deep in the brains of female mice changes in response to estrogen could offer insight into human brains. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, led the study and is quoted in this post.

  • Pinterest Newsroom

    New tools for managing difficult emotions

    Pinterest is expanding their compassionate search experience to better support people who are feeling sadness, pain or other emotions related to the urge to self-harm. Brainstorm, the Stanford Lab for Mental Health Innovation, worked with them on the new tools.

  • Wired

    Pinterest Has a New Plan to Address Self-Harm

    The company has gotten better at removing distressing content. Now it wants to help users feel better. Nina Vasan, clinical assistant professor and founder and director at Brainstorm - one of the groups that worked with Pinterest - provides comment.

  • News Center

    Stanford researchers awarded close to $9 million for opioid, pain studies

    Five researchers were awarded grants from the National Institutes of Health to study opioid misuse and pain treatment - including Luis de Lecea, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Nolan Williams, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • News Center

    Videos to educate lawyers on interviewing migrant kids at border

    Stanford experts have created four short videos to help lawyers at the U.S. border learn to sensitively interview migrant children and teens about traumatic experiences. Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned in this article.

  • FRONTLINE

    U.S. Held a Record Number of Migrant Kids in Custody This Year

    Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article on the trauma inflicted onto detained migrant children.

  • TheHill

    Breaking the cycle of adverse childhood experiences and the culture of silence

    Having a history of childhood trauma was associated with an increased risk of a number of mental and physical health problems later on in life. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NYT Parenting

    How To Deal With Your Kid’s Annoying Habits

    You might want to nag or scold, but positive reinforcement is more effective. Hear what Jacob Towery, adjunct clinical instructor, has to say about effective parenting strategies.

  • Yahoo Lifestyle

    Is too much screen time affecting young kids’ brain development? Here’s what parents should know

    A recent study in JAMA Pediatrics, reveals that the brains of pre-kindergarten children who spend more than an hour per day of screen time without parental interaction are associated with underdeveloped areas that control language and self-regulation. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the findings.

  • Finding Fixes

    S2 E4 Medical marijuana — Finding Fixes

    Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and medical director of Addiction Medicine, is interviewed about the use of medical marijuana in place of opioid painkillers for chronic pain, and the potential side effects associated with medical marijuana.

  • Nature Medicine

    The hidden biology of the human brain

    Sergiu Pașca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral science, is featured by Nature Medicine for his pioneering work in developing 3D brain-region-specific organoids, assembloids and cellular models of neuropsychiatric disease from stem cells.

  • HuffPost

    Why Some People With Anxiety Love Watching Horror Movies

    Mental health experts explain why watching scary movies may help some people cope with their anxiety symptoms. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describe how horror movies may be a helpful distraction.

  • Parade

    This Specific Detail in Michelle Pfeiffer's #MeToo Story Is Something Sexual Assault Survivors Really Need to Hear

    Michelle Pfeiffer recently revealed more about an “inappropriate” and “uncomfortable” #MeToo encounter from her past, and she inadvertently aided in destigmatizing self-blame in the process. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Scope

    "Two Minds" two years later: Still curious about sex differences in cognition? Here are some resources - Scope

    A 2017 Stanford Medicine magazine article on sex differences in the brain remains popular, and this post provides additional information. Nirao Shah, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is mentioned here.

  • HuffPost

    What To Do If Your Partner Has Totally Different Sleep Habits

    Couples with competing sleeping habits can be problematic. This pieces offers guidance on how to cope with it and quotes Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Opinion

    Opinion | Making Drug Companies Pay for the Opioid Epidemic

    This opinion piece looks at the role of the courts in the opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Palo Alto Online

    At long last, Palo Alto will have a mental health center where teens can walk in for help

    A yearslong effort to open a first-of-its-kind youth mental health center in Palo Alto reached a major milestone on Tuesday: approval of a lease for a physical space on Middlefield Road. This will be the future home of allcove, a walk-in mental health clinic inspired by Australian centers that provide support services, education and other wellness resources at little to no cost to youth ages 12 to 25. It's expected to open by May. More info: https://www.allcove.org/

  • Scope

    How listening for stories saved my career in medicine: Scope@10,000 - Scope

    How listening for stories saved my career in medicine: Scope@10,000 Throughout her medical career, listening to her patients has helped psychiatrist Shaili Jain, clinical associate professor (affiliated) of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, transcend the job's challenges.

  • Medical News Today

    Healthful snacks can reduce feelings of fatigue

    Improved nutrition — and access to healthy foods — can reduce the effects of sleep deprivation in physicians, new Stanford Medicine research suggests. Maryam Hamidi, associate director of scholarship and health promotion at the Stanford Medicine WellMD Center and a co-author of the study, is quoted in this article.

  • NBC News

    The cast of Seinfeld lulls me off to sleep. Is it as good for me as it feels?

    This article looks at whether falling asleep to the TV is a healthy bedtime ritual. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the sleep habit.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

    Sustaining Mental Health Care: Making the Case

    The adult Cystic Fibrosis Center at Stanford was able to offer mental health services, as well as screening for anxiety and depression by embedding Yelizaveta Sher, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, into their team. Initiating these services was made possible by a Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Mental Health Coordinator Grant Award, and this article covers the year-long campaign to secure sustainable funding.

  • Scientific American

    Why Do Some People Need Less Sleep? It's in Their DNA

    Researchers have identified a new gene mutation associated with short sleepers. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the study, is quoted in this article.

  • Child Mind Institute

    How Does CBT Help People With Psychosis?

    Specialized cognitive behavioral therapy therapy helps patients with psychosis manage symptoms of schizophrenia, including delusions and hallucinations. Kate Hardy, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences who specializes in CBTp at our INSPIRE Clinic and is involved in training efforts, provides comment.

  • Scope

    The little things: Scope@10,000 - Scope

    Looking back on her medical training, Jessica Gold, former psychiatry resident at Stanford, realizes it was the little things - like watching a resident console a scared patient - that mattered.

  • NY Times

    Are There Benefits to Drinking Kombucha?

    Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, provides comment in this piece looking at whether or not there are benefits to drinking kombucha.

  • KQED

    Legislation Moves Forward Earliest Start Times in California Schools

    California becomes the first state to mandate later school start times. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed live about what the newly passed bill means for sleep-deprived students.

  • Texas Public Radio

    Hoarding Is More Than Clutter And Collections. It’s A Disorder And Can Be Deadly

    A series of deadly fires in San Antonio, TX has led to 4 deaths related to hoarding disorder. Carolyn Rodriguez, director of the Hoarding Disorders Research Program and associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed about the common signs of hoarding and options for treatment.

  • Yahoo.com

    Is sleeping too much putting your health at risk?

    A new study in The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association found a link between sleeping for long periods of time (along with chronic insomnia symptoms) and declines in memory, executive function and processing speed. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the findings.

  • Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute

    Announcing the 2019 Seed Grant Award Recipients

    The Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute has announced its third round of seed grants to six interdisciplinary teams of researchers who collectively span departments from neurosurgery to music. Among the recipients is the project entitled "Quantifying auditory-vocal affect in human social communication." which includes Karen J. Parker, Jonathan Berger, Michael Frank, and Daniel Bowling on the research team.

  • Scope

    Health care among top priorities for lawmakers, congresswoman says - Scope

    Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) was the featured speaker at the recent Stanford Health Policy Forum. During the conversation, introduced by Dean Lloyd Minor, and Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Lofgren spoke candidly about the most vexing issues in U.S. policy.

  • AACAP

    Manpreet K. Singh, MD, MS, Receives AACAP Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation Award for Researc

    The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) is proud to announce Manpreet K. Singh, MD, MS, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine, as the recipient of the 2019 Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation Award for Research in Depression or Suicide for her paper, “Limbic Intrinsic Connectivity in Depressed and High-Risk Youth," published in the October 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). Dr. Singh presents her paper at AACAP’s 66th Annual Meeting on October 17, 2019.

  • Vox

    The case for prosecuting the Sacklers and other opioid executives

    This piece discusses the lawsuits against Purdue Pharma, the American opioid drug-maker. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted here.

  • ThriveGlobal

    This New Brain Science Could Help You Unlock Better Mental Health

    This piece, written by Leanne Williams, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of Stanford’s Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness, discusses the neuroscience of mental health.

  • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Spotlight: BrainMind Summit 2018

    This autumn Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences will, for the third time, co-host a gathering of groundbreaking scientists and influential supporters of human health with the collective goal of bringing the best brain science to the aid of the world as quickly and responsibly as possible. Watch videos from the 2018 Summit and learn about the upcoming Summit here.

  • YouTube

    Why America’s opioid epidemic is going global

    Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, declared bankruptcy as part of a tentative deal to settle more than 2,000 lawsuits alleging that they and other opioid manufacturers worsened the US opioid epidemic. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was featured in this documentary.

  • MDAlert

    Light flashes plus cognitive behavior therapy can increase teens' sleep time - MDalert.com

    Stanford researchers increased how long teens slept with light therapy, used to reset their circadian clocks, combined with cognitive behavioral therapy to motivate them to go to bed earlier. Senior author Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • POPSUGAR Fitness

    According to a Doctor, Here's When You Should Work Out For a Full Night of Restorative Sleep

    A poor night of sleep can have an adverse effect on your workout. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why the timing of exercise can make a big difference in quality of sleep.

  • Time

    How the Trump Administration Is Privatizing the Detention of Migrant Children

    Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of community research programs for Stanford Medicine's Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Program, is quoted int his article about children’s welfare.

  • Stanford News

    Bringing neuroscience to bear on addiction policy | Stanford News

    Keith Humphreys,the Esther Ting Memorial Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, founded the Stanford Network on Addiction Policy to help bring more science to debates over drug policy. He talked to Stanford News about why he started SNAP and how it works.

  • Scope

    In the Spotlight: 'You're never going to get into medical school' - Scope

    This Spotlight Q&A features Omar Sahak, Stanford psychiatry resident, who failed his first college biology class but forged his own path to medicine.

  • Tracing the US opioid crisis to its roots

    Tracing the US opioid crisis to its roots

    Understanding how the opioid epidemic arose in the United States could help to predict how it might spread to other countries. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • CNN

    It's not just opioids: What doctors want you to know about benzos

    This segment will focus on benzodiazepines, a class of prescription medications that are widely prescribed for anxiety. Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the Stanford Addiction Dual Diagnosis Clinic, will be featured. "This Is Life with Lisa Ling" airs Sunday at 10 p.m on CNN.

  • Apple Podcasts

    ‎Function with Anil Dash: We Can't Just Log Off: Mental Health and Tech on Apple Podcasts

    The podcast looks at the impact the internet has made on mental health...helpful or harmful. Elias Aboujaoude, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, participates in a roundtable discussion on how the web is changing social interaction.

  • OM Magazine

    Where science meets soul

    Christiane Brems, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses the missions and official launch of the special initiative program YogaX (yogaxu.com) with OM Magazine in this article.

  • News Center

    $4.75 million awarded to scientists for high-risk, high-reward research

    One of the four Stanford recipients, Corey Keller, an instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, received the Early Independence Award, which promotes independent research by junior investigators by allowing them to forgo the traditional postdoctoral training period. Keller plans to use his award to uncover new methods of improving brain stimulation treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  • NIMHD

    NIH announces winners of high school mental health essay contest

    Winners of NIH's "Speaking Up About Mental Health!" essay contest, which explored stigma and social barriers in seeking mental health treatment, have been announced. Two youth advisors from the youth advisory group (YAG) for allcove, a project currently in planning by the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing, were recognized by the essay contest: Winner: "Find Your Center" by Sahithi and Honorable Mention: "Peer Programs: A Solution for Youth by Youth" by Samskruthi.

  • WSJ

    Does Getting Stoned Help You Get Toned? Gym Rats Embrace Marijuana

    This article discusses how fitness junkies are making marijuana a part of their workout routines. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • AFSP

    American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Invests $6.2M in Scientific Research to Prevent Tenth Leading Cause of Death

    The largest private funder of suicide prevention research, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), recently announced 26 new grants totaling over $6.2 million. Details for two new grants in our department were shared, including "Opiate Suicide Study in Patients with Major Depression" PI Alan Schatzberg, Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and "Pilot Study to Identify Modifiable Transdiagnostic Suicide Attempt Risk Factors" PI Carolyn Rodriguez, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • The Hollywood Reporter

    Aurora Shooting Victims Voice Fears Over 'Joker' in Letter to Warner Bros.

    The upcoming film, the Joker, is attracting attention for its depiction of violence and has been the focus of some survivors of the Aurora, Colorado 2012 mass shooting in a movie theater. Debra Lee Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who specializes in PTSD, offers comment here.

  • News Center

    Teens sleep 43 more minutes per night after combo of two treatments, study finds

    Stanford researchers increased how long teens slept with light therapy, used to reset their circadian clocks, combined with cognitive behavioral therapy to motivate them to go to bed earlier. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author.

  • BBC

    The Science of Addiction - BBC Sounds

    Neuroscientists now have a sophisticated understanding of the networks in the brain that can pull a person towards addiction and hold them there. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this podcast.

  • Scope

    Two hormones may help kids with autism - Scope

    This post highlights a story in the current issue of Stanford Medicine magazine describing how describes how Stanford researchers are working to understand the intertwined roles of two hormones that affect social behavior. Karen Parker, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are mentioned here

  • Scope

    Will antidepressants work? Brain activity can help predict - Scope

    Using neuroimaging and machine learning, researchers were able to predict whether antidepressants would help individual patients. Amit Etkin, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this post.

  • Scope

    Sleep deprived? A healthy diet can help - Scope

    Improved nutrition — and access to healthy foods — can reduce the effects of sleep deprivation in physicians, new Stanford Medicine research suggests. Maryam Hamidi, social science researcher, and Mickey Trockel, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are authors.

  • Changing the Face of Yoga

    Stimulus - Yoga - Response

    To learn more about YogaX, you can now listen to a podcast by Stephanie Cunningham of "Changing the Face of Yoga", interviewing Chris Brems, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Director of YogaX. Learn about YogaX, its underlying philosophy, its understanding of yoga, and more.

  • GQ

    How We Ruined the Dad Bod

    The term ‘dad bod’ has taken on a whole new meaning thanks to the unrealistic depictions of chiseled fathers on the big screen and TV. What was once viewed as the standard of normalcy has now led to body shaming. Sarah Adler, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences , and Dan Azagury, assistant professor of surgery, comment about the negative effect on self-esteem.

  • Autism Speaks

    Autism Speaks awards more than $4.7 million for autism research | Autism Speaks

    Autism Speaks, the global nonprofit dedicated to promoting solutions, across the spectrum and throughout the life span, for the needs of people with autism and their families, announced more than $4.7 million in grant funding to 26 researchers studying autism, including Antonio Hardan, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Lawrence Fung, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Bustle

    Experts Explain How 'Unbelievable' Exposes A Key Thing We Get Wrong About Trauma

    The misconception that we can somehow measure trauma — that there is a "right" or "wrong" way to react — is something that often comes up in true crime stories. Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed.

  • EverydayHealth.com

    11 Unexpected Health-Promoting Benefits of Yoga

    Aside from improving muscle tone and flexibility, yoga can be beneficial for chronic health conditions including asthma, heart disease, sleep issues and MS. Manuela Kogon, clinical associate professor psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes the benefits.

  • FRONTLINE

    Revisit Purdue Pharma’s Role in the Opioid Crisis

    This piece revisits a 2016 Frontline documentary, Chasing Heroin, which investigated America’s heroin and opioid abuse crisis – including allegations about the pharmaceutical industry's role in the early years of what has been called the worst drug epidemic in U.S. history. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Thrive Global

    Why do we sleep talk? Here’s everything you should know - Thrive Global

    Nearly 66% of the population has talked in their sleep in some form, according to a 2010 study. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Column: Kicking a dependence on prescription drugs can be very hard. Here's how I'm doing it

    This piece looks at the difference between dependence and addiction, particularly on prescription drugs. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • NYT Parenting

    How to Make Night Terrors Less Terrifying

    Night terrors, nightmares that cause screaming and thrashing in the night, are most common in toddlers and preschoolers, and can last up to age 12. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides input on the causes these episodes and how parent can handle them.

  • NBC News

    How to identify a narcissist — and cope with their potentially toxic behavior

    This piece discusses narcissistic personality disorder. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment here.

  • Dr. Keith Humphreys on the Campbell Conversations

    Dr. Keith Humphreys on the Campbell Conversations

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses marijuana legalization in a recent conversation on New York public radio.

  • AJP Residents' Journal

    AJP Residents' Journal: Interview with Anna Lembke, MD

    Senior Deputy Editor Matthew Edwards, resident in psychiatry, interviews Anna Lembke, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, about Addiction Psychiatry and her book Drug Dealer, MD.

  • Los Angeles Times

    Column: Hi, I'm David. I'm a drug addict

    This piece discusses how coming off antidepressants can mirror the struggle many people face in trying to wean themselves from prescription drugs. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Washington Monthly

    Opioid Prescriptions in the U.S. Are Down, But It Still Leads the World

    This article, written by Keith Humphreys, examines new United Nations data on opioid consumption.

  • Spectrum | Autism Research News

    How studying sleep in animals could unearth autism’s roots

    Problems with sleep may contribute to autism's underlying biology — a connection that scientists can study in animal models. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, writes this Viewpoint article.

  • Sacklers vs. States

    Sacklers vs. States: Settlement Talks Stumble Over Foreign Business

    The future of Purdue Pharma, and the Sackler family's ownership, is in dispute in the wake of lawsuits over its role in the opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this article.

  • Deseret News

    Could psychedelic drugs become the new medical marijuana? Inside the potential benefits and high risks of ‘magic mushrooms’

    Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in this story on the use psychedelic drugs for medicinal purposes.

  • Stanford News

    Stanford student mental health and well-being services expanded | Stanford News

    A new model for Stanford students seeking mental health and well-being services is among the changes Vaden Health Center is making to better provide services in the future. Bina Patel, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of counseling and psychological services, provides comment.

  • Real Simple

    White Noise, Pink Noise, or Brown Noise—Which Color Is for You?

    Finding the right sleep noise can mean better sleep for years to come. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, describes how the ‘color’ of noise, machine-generated sounds, can affect the quality of sleep.

  • BBC

    Newsday - US drug-maker seeks to settle lawsuits over opioid cases - BBC Sounds

    Purdue Pharma, the American opioid drug-maker is in discussion to settle more than two thousand opioid lawsuits against it. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured in this podcast.

  • Scope Blog Stanford Medicine

    Pesticide exposure linked to brain activity differences in adolescents, study finds

    Teenagers exposed to common agricultural pesticides before birth had distinctive reductions in certain types of brain activity, a new study has found. Joseph Baker, Instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Allan L. Reiss, the Howard C. Robbins professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and professor of radiology, are co-authors of the study.

  • PBS NewsHour

    What Oklahoma's landmark opioid ruling could mean for other states

    A judge in Oklahoma rules that pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson contributed to the opioid crisis. Keith Humphreys, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the ruling and the effect it could have on lawsuits pending against other drug companies.

  • World Journal

    Stanford CHIPAO to perform in the East Bay

    Members from Stanford CHIPAO will soon perform vignettes in the East Bay to help families learn to communicate more effectively about difficult topics. Rona Hu, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured here during a press conference with the mayors of Danville and San Ramon, and school board and PTA members.

  • This American Life

    Ten Sessions - This American Life

    What if someone told you about a type of therapy that could help you work through unhealed trauma in just ten sessions? Some people knock through it in two weeks. Jaime Lowe tried the therapy—and recorded it. This series features Debra Kaysen, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • PBS NewsHour

    Proposed rule could make it easier to share addiction treatment records

    The Department of Health and Human Services has proposed a new rule that would give doctors greater access to records of patients who are being treated for substance use disorder, in an effort to better coordinate care. This piece discusses how the change has raised concerns about the potential impact on patient privacy. Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.