Interventional Psychiatry Clinic

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

TMS is an FDA-approved treatment for major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder.  It is non-invasive and involves the repeated application of brief magnetic pulses to the brain.  TMS is a safe, non-invasive, outpatient procedure shown to help patients who have not benefited from antidepressant medication.  We offer TMS at Stanford and have multiple devices capable of providing personalized therapy.  TMS is associated with few side effects, the most common being mild scalp discomfort during treatment.

Electro-Convulsive Therapy

ECT is a highly effective treatment most often used in severe cases of depression and catatonia.  It is the oldest, most rapid, and most effective treatment for depression.  It is a non-invasive procedure involving use of brief general anesthesia and electrical stimulation to induce a controlled, generalized seizure.  ECT has been shown to be a rapid and robust treatment for depression when medications and psychotherapy are ineffective.  It is particularly effective for treatment of geriatric depression and is often a treatment when no others are effective.  ECT is associated with memory side effects which can be minimized with use of techniques such as right unilateral, ultra-brief ECT.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation

VNS is an FDA-approved treatment for treatment-resistant depression and epilepsy.  It involves surgical implantation of a device similar to a pacemaker which is attached to a wire connecting to the vagus nerve in the neck.  VNS is considered an invasive treatment since implantation of the device requires minor surgery.  VNS is not widely available due to limited insurance coverage.  It is associate with few side effects, the most common being hoarseness or changes in voice.  

Deep Brain Stimulation

DBS is an FDA-approved treatment for conditions including Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.  It is an invasive procedure involving neurosurgical implantation of brain electrodes connected to a pulse generator to directly modulate brain circuits and activity.  Despite its invasive nature, DBS is considered reversible and associated with few side effects.  

Research

Please visit the following labs for more information on research being done in this area:

Faculty

Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Octavio Choi, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emerita
Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center
Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences