The Stanford Center for Memory Disorders Team

Michael Greicius, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Stanford Center for Memory Disorders
Associate Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Greicius is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the medical director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders and the principal investigator of the Functional Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders (FIND) Lab. His research involves the use of imaging to identify and characterize the large array of brain networks whose actions and interactions support normal human behavior.  His lab also uses network-based imaging approaches and genetics to gain insights into Alzheimer’s disease and other brain disorders. Recent work has focused on sex-based differences in the genetic risk of Alzheimer’s disease.


Katrin Andreasson, MD
Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Andreasson is Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, and is a neurologist who treats patients with dementia and who is also engaged in basic research in neurodegenerative disorders.  Dr. Andreasson received her M.D. degree at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, completed her residency in Neurology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and carried out her postdoctoral training in the Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience, where she began her research studies on the function of brain inflammation in development of neurodegenerative disease.    The objectives of her laboratory research are to identify specific inflammatory pathways that may be targeted to prevent and treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.   


Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS
Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health
Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Henderson is principal investigator for the NIH Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, funded by the National Institute on Aging to facilitate and enhance research on Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders of aging and cognition. His research emphasizes brain–behavior relations, risk factors for cognitive aging and Alzheimer’s disease, and therapeutic strategies to maintain and improve cognitive abilities affected by age. He co-directs the Stanford master’s degree program in Epidemiology & Clinical Research. Dr. Henderson obtained his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University, and he trained at Duke University (internal medicine), Washington University in St. Louis (neurology), Boston University (behavioral neurology), and the University of Washington School of Public Health (epidemiology). He was visiting professor at the University of Melbourne (Australia) and at the University of Aarhus (Denmark), where he is currently Honorary Skou Professor. He has held leadership positions in professional organizations focused on late-life and midlife health, serves on editorial boards and scientific advisory boards, and has published numerous scientific articles.


Frank M. Longo, MD, PhD
George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine
Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Longo is chair of the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, the George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, and director of the Stanford Alzheimer’s Translational Research Center. His clinical interest include Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.  His research team is developing new drugs that are focused on the modulation of fundamental cell signaling pathways that are involved in neurodegeneration. These pathways can be regulated by known protein growth factors but such proteins cannot be used as drugs. Dr. Longo’s team has pioneered the development of the first small molecule, drug-type compounds that can mimic key parts of growth factor proteins and achieve their potent effects on preventing or reversing degeneration. Work in Alzheimer’s mice has been extremely promising and efforts are now underway to bring the first of these compounds to human trials.


Kathleen Poston, MD, MS
Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Poston received her Bachelor's of Science in Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, her Master's Degree in Biomedical Engineering and her MD at Vanderbilt University. She completed her Neurology residency training at UCSF, where she was Chief Resident. She also completed a fellowship in clinical Movement Disorders under the mentorship of Dr. Stanley Fahn at Columbia University and post-doctoral training in Functional Neuroimaging with Dr. David Eidelberg at the Feinstein Institute.

Dr. Poston's clinical expertise focuses on Parkinson's disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, and atypical Parkinsonian disorders (Multiple System Atrophy, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Cortical Basal Syndrome), with a special interest in the cognitive and non-motor symptoms in these disorders. She also treats patients with dystonia and blepharospasm with botulinum toxin.

Dr. Poston's research uses functional and structural imaging biomarkers that (1) aid in understanding the underlying pathophysiology associated with the motor, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms characteristic of Parkinson’s disease and (2) aid in diagnosis and objectivity track disease progression in clinical trials.  She has also been the Principal Investigator for interventional clinical trials in movement disorders, such as Gene Therapy in Parkinson's disease.


Irina Skylar-Scott, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Irina Anna Skylar-Scott is a board-certified Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University. Her clinic is dedicated to caring for patients with changes in memory, language, behavior, and other aspects of cognition and conduct. She also devotes her time to clinical drug trials for Alzheimer’s disease.  

Dr. Skylar-Scott earned a BS at MIT followed by an MD from the Yale University School of Medicine. After finishing a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Medical Research Fellowship, she completed her neurology training at Harvard’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She subspecialized in cognitive neurology at Harvard following a fellowship at the Center for Brain/Mind Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  


Sharon Sha, MD, MS
Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Sha is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University where she serves as the Medical Director of the Stanford Neuroscience Clinical Trials Group, Co-Director of the Huntington’s Disease Center of Excellence and Ataxia Clinic, Co-Director of the Lewy Body Disease Association Research Center of Excellence, Clinical Core Co-Leader of the Stanford Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and Director of the Behavioral Neurology Fellowship. Her clinical time is devoted to caring for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Her research is devoted to finding treatments for cognitive disorders. Her recent work focused on the safety of young plasma for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Sha received a Master’s degree in Physiology and an MD from Georgetown University, followed by Neurology training at UCLA and Stanford University. She completed a clinical and research fellowship in Behavioral Neurology at UCSF, where she focused on identifying biomarkers for genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia and caring for patients with movement disorders with cognitive impairment.


Edmond Teng, MD, PhD
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

Dr. Teng is an Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences and serves as a clinician at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders. He also has a full-time position at Genentech as an Associate Medical Director in Early Clinical Development, where he focuses on developing new treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Teng completed his undergraduate training at Stanford University (BS in Chemistry) and obtained his MD and PhD (in Neurosciences) degrees at UC San Diego. He subsequently completed his internship, residency training in neurology, and fellowship training in behavioral neurology at both UCLA and the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center. He was a full-time faculty member in the Department of Neurology at both institutions from 2008 to 2017, where he worked on translational and clinical research projects in Alzheimer's Disease.


Dominique Low
Behavioral Fellow

Psychiatry

John Barry, MD
Professor of Psychiatry

Dr. Barry is the Director of the Neuropsychiatry and Psychotherapy Clinics has a special interest in psychiatric problems of people with epilepsy. He has done studies of depression and psychosis in association with epilepsy, and of the psychiatric mimics of seizures, called psychogenic non-epileptic seizure-like events, also known as psychogenic seizures or pseudoseizures. In patients admitted for video-EEG evaluation, he leads the efforts in making the diagnosis of psychogenic disorders and treating the patients disabled by this condition.


Neuropsychology

Gayle K Deutch, PhD, ABPP
Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Gayle K. Deutsch, PhD, ABPP-CN received her doctoral degree in clinical psychology at Drexel University in 1994. She completed a pre-doctoral internship at the Brain Behavior Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, PA. She was the Staff Neuropsychologist at the New Jersey Neuroscience Institute and Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Seton Hall University, Graduate School of Medical Education.  She was at Stanford University Medical Center as the lead neuropsychologist for the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences from 2000 until 2004.  From 2005 to 2008, she had a private practice in Orange County, CA and a faculty appointment as Associate Clinical Professor at UCI Medical Center, Department of Neurology. She returned to Stanford Health Care in 2008 and is currently a Clinical Associate Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. She is the lead neuropsychologist for the Stanford Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and Stanford Center for Memory Disorders. She is involved in collaborative research with the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders and the Stanford Neuromuscular Program.


Lauren Drag, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Lauren Drag, PhD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her bachelor’s degree from Pomona College and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Arizona. She completed a clinical internship in neuropsychology at the VA Ann Arbor Medical Center and a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in neuropsychology at the University of Michigan Healthcare System. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was a researcher at the VA Palo Alto Medical Center and served as Director of the Neuropsychology Area of Emphasis at Palo Alto University. Dr. Drag’s research interests are in cognitive aging and traumatic brain injury.


Simon Tan, PsyD, ABPP
Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Tan received his bachelor's degree at Dartmouth College, doctorate in clinical psychology from Yeshiva University, and completed a pre-doctoral internship at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Tan also completed a post-doctoral fellowship specializing in clinical neuropsychology in both adult inpatient and outpatient settings at the Behavioral Neurology Unit, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Cambridge Hospital at Harvard. He received his board certification (specialization in geriatric assessment) by the American Board of Assessment Psychology in April of 2013. He completed a program to obtain my Postdoctoral Master of Science degree in Clinical Psychopharmacology at Alliant University with degree received in December 2013.

Maya Yutsis PhD, ABPP
Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Maya Yutsis, Ph.D., ABPP-CN is a Clinical Assistant Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology at the Palo Alto University in 2009. She completed an APA approved clinical internship in neuropsychology at the Minneapolis VA Medical center and a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN in 2011. Prior to coming to Stanford, she worked as a lead neuropsychologist for three years at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program and Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC) Telehealth Neuropsychology clinic, where she conducted clinical services, clinical research, and served as a director/preceptor of an APA-approved post-doctoral fellowship Neuropsychology Emphasis Area training program.  She had previously worked as a Staff Neuropsychologist in inpatient and outpatient Rehabilitation Units at the Multicare Good Samaritan Hospital in Puyallup, WA.  She is currently a Newsletter Editor of the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, APA Division 40 and is a member of Publications and Research Committee for the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN).  She is involved in collaborative research with the Palo Alto VA Polytrauma Center and Mayo Clinic and her research interests focus on computerized cognitive rehabilitation interventions for persons with acquired brain injury and mild cognitive impairment (MCI).


Penelope Zeifert, PhD
Clinical Professor (Affiliated), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

Dr. Zeifert is Clinical Professor (Affiliated) in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine.  She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley, and doctorate in clinical psychology from California School of Professional Psychology.  She completed pre-doctoral internships in San Francisco at Mt. Zion Hospital and St. Mary’s McAuley Neuropsychiatric Institute.  She was a post-doctoral scholar in the UCSF School of Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital where she subsequently worked as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and an Attending Psychologist.  She has been on staff at Stanford since 1993, first as a neuropsychologist in inpatient rehabilitation and later in inpatient psychiatry. She has been the Director of the Neuropsychology Service since 1997 and the Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders since 2002.