Clinical Trials

OVERVIEW

The Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology conducts clinical trials on novel therapeutics for various liver diseases, bringing promising and innovative therapies to our patients.

Our team has extensive experience selecting the right patients for the right trials.

Clinical trials are an important part of the research involved in developing new medical treatments. Enrolling in a clinical trial enables participants to take an active role in their own health care, gain entrance to new research, and contribute to medical science.

Participants must meet specific criteria to be eligible for enrollment in a clinical trial. Some research studies seek participants with illnesses or specific conditions to be studied in the clinicaltrial, while others ask for healthy participants.

CURRENT AND ONGOING TRIALS

Showing 1 - 13 of 13 trials

  • Vitamin D Regulation of Gut Specific B Cells and Antibodies Targeting Gut Bacteria in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Specific Aim 1: Characterize the effects of vitamin D treatment on expression of α4β7 on B cells in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

    Specific Aim 2: Determine the effects of vitamin D treatment on fecal immunoglobulins, percentage of Ig-coated gut bacteria, gut microbiome composition (global and bound by immunoglobulins) in patients with IBD and the association of these parameters with change in α4β7+ B cells .

    Specific Aim 3: Compare BCR repertoire (BCR clonotypes, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IGHV), and isotype usage) between α4β7+ and α4β7- B cells in patients with IBD and identify α4β7+ BCR clonotypes associated with Ig-bound gut bacteria .

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • The GAstric Precancerous Conditions Study

    Gastric cancer afflicts 27,000 Americans annually and carries a dismal prognosis. One reason for poor outcomes is late diagnosis, as the majority of gastric cancers in the United States are diagnosed at a relatively advanced stage where curative resection is unlikely. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a precancerous change of the stomach which increases risk for subsequent gastric cancer multiple-fold.

    The Gastric Precancerous Conditions Study (GAPS) is an observational study with two over-arching objectives: 1) improve the non-invasive identification of patients with GIM, and 2) develop biological markers to predict the subset of GIM which will progress onto gastric cancer.

    To achieve Aim 1, a case-control study (N=300 pairs) matching cases of GIM with age-/gender-matched controls will be recruited form the population of subjects undergoing clinically-indicated endoscopy. Determination of gastric pathology will be made by two, independent gastrointestinal pathologists. At time of endoscopy, a detailed clinical questionnaire is administered by face-to-face interview. Saliva and blood is collected prior to endoscopy. At time of endoscopy, protocoled clinical biopsies (per Revised Sydney Protocol) as well as additional research specimens are collected. Scoring of GIM will be performed based on the Operative Link for GIM scoring system.

    To achieve Aim 2, patients with histologically-confirmed GIM (N=300) will be followed longitudinally. Biennial endoscopic surveillance will be performed, with repeat biopsies, specimen collection, and histologic scoring. Progression of GIM will be defined as upstaging of GIM score, or development of either dysplasia or carcinoma on any biopsy.

    Now accepting new patients View Details
  • The Influence of a Fasting Mimicking Diet on Ulcerative Colitis

    The purpose of this study is to see how a diet that mimics fasting effects inflammation in patients with mild to moderate Ulcerative Colitis (UC). The diet may allow users to receive the benefits of fasting while also being able to enjoy food (the ingredients of which are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Research on dietary interventions and UC are very limited. Fasting mimicking diets (FMD) have been studied with support of the National Institute of Health and published in leading journals. This research investigates whether markers of inflammation decrease and/or quality of life increases after three cycles of a five-day period of the fasting mimicking diet, and may provide rationale for its use to treat UC.

    Investigator

    Now accepting new patients View Details
  • Zemedy Application for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    The purpose of the study is investigate the effectiveness of Zemedy, a mobile application that enables the digital delivery of a CBT program to people with IBS.

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • The Role of Secondary Bile Acids in Intestinal Inflammation

    The cause of Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but intestinal bacteria-involved in the production of molecules that impact health-are widely accepted to play a key role. A significant proportion of IBD patients with pouches (surgically created rectums after the diseased colon is removed) continue to have inflammation similar to their previous disease.

    Only a few microbes are known to have the capability to modify primary bile acids (PBAs) made by the liver to secondary bile acids (SBAs). SBAs are some of the most common metabolites in the colon and play key roles in several diseases.

    In this study the investigators will investigate if ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may reduce inflammatory markers and improve quality of life (as assessed by validate survey) in those subjects with active antibiotic refractory or antibiotic dependent pouchitis.

    Investigator

    Now accepting new patients View Details
  • Non-Complex Biliary Stones DSC vs ERC

    To prospectively compare non-complex biliary stone clearance using fluoroscopy/radiation-free direct solitary cholangioscopy (DSC) utilizing the SpyGlass™ system with non-complex biliary stone clearance using standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC).

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • Study to Intervene With Nutrition for Gastroparesis

    The study is a self-controlled study in which we will assess the nutritional effects of the Kate Farm Peptide 1.5 nutritional Formula in patients with gastroparesis, relative to their pre-enrollment nutritional diet regimen.

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • Study To Evaluate The Efficacy And Safety Of Oral PF-06651600 And PF-06700841 In Subjects With Moderate To Severe Crohn's Disease

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficacy, safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of PF-06651600 (200 mg for 8 weeks followed by 50 mg for 4 weeks) dosed once daily and PF-06700841 (60 mg for 12 weeks) dosed once daily during an induction period of 12 weeks, followed by an open label extension period at doses of 50 mg and 30 mg of PF 06651600 and PF 06700841, respectively, for 52 weeks.

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • Study to Assess Efficacy and Safety of Cx601, Adult Allogeneic Expanded Adipose-derived Stem Cells (eASC) for the Treatment of Complex Perianal Fistula(s) in Participants With Crohn's Disease (CD)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combined remission of complex perianal fistulas, defined as the clinical assessment at Week 24 of closure of all treated external openings that were draining at baseline despite gentle finger compression, and absence of collections greater than (\>) 2 centimeter (cm) (in at least 2 dimensions) confirmed by blinded central magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment at Week 24.

    Investigators

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • Magnesium for Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy

    Postoperative pain after peroral endoscopic myotomy occurs due to involuntary esophageal smooth muscle spasms. Magnesium has antispasmodic properties as a smooth muscle relaxant. This study hypothesizes that among patients having peroral endoscopic myotomy, magnesium will decrease postoperative esophgeal pain as measured by the esophageal symptoms questionnaire, while decreasing perioperative opioid requirements.

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • Effects of an Intermittent Reduced Calorie Diet on Crohn's Disease

    The purpose of this study is to see how an Intermittent Calorie Reduced Diet (IRCD) that mimics fasting effects inflammation in patients with mild to moderate Crohn's disease (CD). The diet may allow users to receive the benefits of fasting while also being able to enjoy food (the ingredients of which are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Research on dietary interventions and CD are very limited. Diets that mimick fasting have been studied with support of the National Institute of Health and published in leading journals. This research investigates whether markers of inflammation decrease and/or quality of life increases after five-day periods of the IRCD, and may provide rationale for its use to treat CD.

    Investigator

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details
  • GI-Challenge Study for Gastroparesis Patients and Healthy Controls

    Gastroparesis Patients and Healthy Controls ages 20-49 will be asked to participate in an observational study measuring vagal activity following food ingestion in order to establish parameters of autonomic nerve/vagal function in healthy human subjects compared to those with gastroparesis. Information generated from this study may be used in the future to establish what is normal and abnormal enteric vagal tone and how much vagal nerve stimulation treatment may be required to help patients with gastroparesis.

    Investigator

    Now accepting new patients View Details
  • Advanced Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Imaging

    To develop new methods to detect malignant and premalignant conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Not accepting patients at this time View Details