Genetics

  • The professor of dermatology and genetics was honored with the 2024 Lurie Prize for his studies into the role of long noncoding RNA in health and disease.

  • Foretelling breast cancer

    In a finding that vastly expands the understanding of tumor evolution, researchers discover genetic biomarkers that can predict the breast cancer subtype a patient is likely to develop.

  • Bengal cat coats not so wild after all

    Researchers studied hundreds of Bengal cats to uncover the genetic origins of their leopard-like patterns and found that their appearance stems largely from domesticated cats.

  • Microbiomes are personal

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues tracked the gut, mouth, nose and skin bacteria of 86 people for as long as six years to try to gauge what constitutes a healthy microbiome.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • DNA shows Roman Empire migration

    The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.

  • Tumor DNA levels in blood predict outcome

    Circulating tumor DNA predicts recurrence and splits disease into two subgroups in Stanford Medicine-led study of Hodgkin lymphoma. New drug targets or changes in treatments may reduce toxicity.

  • Role for ‘junk DNA’

    Changes to short, repetitive sequences in the genome have been linked to diseases like autism and schizophrenia. New revelations about how such changes increase and decrease gene expression may provide insight into these and other disorders.

  • Arc Institute awards

    Two professors are named Innovation Investigators, and four win Ignite Awards.

  • Gene version cuts Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s risk

    A massive study of medical and genetic data shows that people with a particular version of a gene involved in immune response had a lower risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

  • Tumor suppressor repairs tissue

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been in the limelight for decades. But its cancer-fighting function may be only a side effect of its role in tissue repair, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Predictable mutations chart cancer’s path

    Human cells evolving in the laboratory undergo a series of predictable, sequential genetic changes that lead to pre-cancer. Blocking these changes may allow intervention before cancer occurs.


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