Genetics

  • The team led by Stanford Medicine analyzed thousands of genomes, including those newly sequenced from 204 skeletons, to gain insight into how and where people moved during the Roman Empire.

  • Role for ‘junk DNA’

    Changes to short, repetitive sequences in the genome have been linked to diseases like autism and schizophrenia. New revelations about how such changes increase and decrease gene expression may provide insight into these and other disorders.

  • Arc Institute awards

    Two professors are named Innovation Investigators, and four win Ignite Awards.

  • Predictable mutations chart cancer’s path

    Human cells evolving in the laboratory undergo a series of predictable, sequential genetic changes that lead to pre-cancer. Blocking these changes may allow intervention before cancer occurs.

  • Few receive genetic tests for cancer

    A new study finds surprisingly low genetic testing rates for cancer patients who may benefit, especially among Asian, Black and Hispanic patients.

  • Personalized PSA improves cancer screening

    The solution to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could lie in every man’s genome. Stanford Medicine researchers take a step toward genetically personalized cancer screening.

  • Genes linked to brain cancer

    An international effort led by a Stanford Medicine researcher finds more than 50 genes linked to glioma — a rare brain cancer. Although most gliomas are sporadic, a minority are inherited.

  • Synthetic biology and sustainability

    Scientists gathered to discuss the future of synthetic biology and how it can help curb climate change and promote sustainability.

  • How beneficial fats increase lifespan

    Fat from olive oil and nuts boosts the numbers of two key cellular structures and protects membranes from damage, lengthening the lives of laboratory worms, Stanford Medicine-led study finds.

  • How statins improve vascular health

    Statins designed to lower cholesterol have long been noted to work in mysterious ways to improve other aspects of cardiovascular health. A Stanford Medicine-led study uncovers how they do it.

  • DNA circles drive cancer development

    Tiny circles of DNA harbor cancer-associated oncogenes and immunomodulatory genes promoting cancer development. They arise during transformation from pre-cancer to cancer, say Stanford Medicine-led team.

  • Myc-caused sugar changes protect cancers

    A novel Stanford School of Medicine partnership uncovers a direct link between a cancer-associated gene, Myc, and sugar patterns on cancer cell surfaces that tell immune cells to stand down.


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