Data Sciences

  • Stanford Medicine researchers have developed a powerful new artificial intelligence model that can distinguish between male and female brains.

  • An LGBTQ-inclusive data set 

    Previous large health studies didn’t collect sexual orientation and gender identity information. A Stanford Medicine study finds the All of Us Research Program a boon to LGBTQ health researchers, future health outcomes.

  • Screening for chronic kidney disease

    Many people don’t know they have chronic kidney disease until it progresses. A new study by Stanford Medicine researchers finds that screening would increase life expectancy in a cost-effective way.

  • Predicting prematurity complications

    Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have shown they can tap mothers’ and babies’ medical records to better predict newborn health risks.

  • Older, younger kids equally OK with phones

    Stanford Medicine researchers did not find a connection between the age children acquired their first cell phone and their sleep patterns, depression symptoms or grades.

  • Stanford Health Care’s technology honor

    Stanford Health Care earned a Most Wired recognition for using outstanding technology in ambulatory and acute care.

  • Cancer disparities in Pacific Islanders

    Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders experience poorer breast cancer survival outcomes that are hidden when their data is included in Asian populations, Stanford researcher says.

  • Marijuana can damage heart

    Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.

  • Test can predict severe dengue

    Researchers have created a test that can predict which dengue patients will likely have mild symptoms and which should be clinically monitored for a high risk of severe illness.

  • Inaugural chief data scientist

    As the inaugural chief data scientist for Stanford Health Care, Nigam Shah will lead an effort to advance the use of artificial intelligence in patient care and hospital administration.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.


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