Cellular & Molecular Biology

  • Hard-driving molecular virologist who used ‘advanced chemistry to unlock the tightly held secrets of viruses’ was also a hearty mountain man, scaling peaks in Alaska and Nepal.

  • How beneficial fats increase lifespan

    Fat from olive oil and nuts boosts the numbers of two key cellular structures and protects membranes from damage, lengthening the lives of laboratory worms, Stanford Medicine-led study finds.

  • Nobelists credit basic research

    A two-day event at the Stanford School of Medicine brought together investors, regulators, company executives and scientists to discuss the most productive ways for them to work together.

  • Agent Orange researcher dies

    James Whitlock, MD, a professor emeritus of molecular pharmacology (now chemical and systems biology), who discovered the negative effects of dioxin on the human body, died at home.

  • Blood drop yields lots of data

    Using a new technique called multi-omic microsampling, Stanford Medicine researchers can measure thousands of protein, fat and metabolic molecules from a single drop of blood.

  • Mice with diabetes regain blood sugar control

    A technique developed at Stanford Medicine allows mice with diabetes to accept unmatched islet cells and durably restores blood sugar control without immunosuppression or graft-versus-host disease.

  • Fish study rebuts anti-evolution argument

    A key developmental gene governs the number and length of spines in the stickleback, Stanford Medicine researchers find. The discovery supports the concept of progressive evolution in nature.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Targeting enzyme that fuels cancer cells

    Stanford Medicine researchers have created a molecule that blocks an enzyme thought to be instrumental in causing colon cancer relapse or chemotherapy resistance.

  • Compound may help treat heart failure

    In preliminary tests, SAMβA (pronounced “samba”) appears to improve heart functions in rats with heart failure caused by a heart attack.

  • Possible zinc strategy for diabetes

    To treat diabetes directly, rather than manage its symptoms, doctors need a way to get drugs to cells that produce insulin. The key, Stanford researchers report, may be those cells’ affinity for zinc.

  • Cell death via trigger waves

    In a cell, death is akin to falling dominoes: One death-inducing molecule activates another, and so on, until the entire cell is shut down, a new Stanford study finds.