Obituaries

  • The microbiologist, on the faculty for nearly half a century, studied a wide range of topics, including antibiotic resistance, cancer, and bacteria as an agent for cleaning up toxic chemicals.

  • Wes Brown dies at 63

    Brown developed stem-cell therapies for patients who suffered infections after receiving blood or bone marrow transplants.

  • Biochemist Lubert Stryer dies at 86

    Stryer made fundamental discoveries in fluorescence spectroscopy and vision, established structural biology at Stanford, and uplifted young scientists.

  • Chuck Chan dies at 48

    The Stanford Medicine researcher was known for his groundbreaking work and his generous spirit as a mentor and colleague.

  • Former medical school dean dies

    David Korn devoted nearly 30 years to Stanford Medicine as chair of pathology and dean of the medical school, overseeing the rise to national prominence amid tumultuous and historic change.

  • Elizabeth Mellins dies

    Mellins, who studied autoimmune disease and co-founded a large pediatric rheumatology research network, was a tireless mentor and advocate for her field.

  • Alistair Philip dies at 86

    Alistair Philip, professor emeritus of pediatrics, pioneered a test to reduce antibiotic use in newborns, streamlined nursery care at several hospitals and devoted his life to educating others in his field.

  • Bill Marshall dies at 92

    The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • Psychiatrist Craig Barr Taylor dies at 78

    Taylor, a Stanford Medicine professor emeritus, took a public health approach to mental health and was an early proponent of digital interventions for anxiety and eating disorders.

  • Richard Olshen dies at 81

    The Stanford Medicine professor was best known for his work in recursive partitioning, an aspect of machine learning.

  • William Weis dies at 64

    William Weis, PhD, former chair of structural biology at Stanford Medicine, refined advanced imaging techniques and described the three-dimensional structure of many cellular components.

  • Alvin Hackel dies at 91

    The Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of anesthesiology and of pediatrics invented a transport incubator for newborns and helped establish pediatric anesthesiology as a specialty.