Environment & Sustainability

  • Researchers at Stanford Medicine and Johns Hopkins University estimate that some 129,000 children younger than 6 in Chicago have elevated levels of the neurotoxin in their blood due to lead pipes.

  • Diet choices can lower carbon footprint

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues have identified simple food swaps that, if adopted universally, could reduce the nation’s food-related carbon footprint by more than a third. The changes are also more healthy.

  • Stanford Medicine’s eco-awards

    Practice Greenhealth, a nonprofit focused on sustainability in health care, recognizes Stanford Medicine with six awards.

  • Synthetic biology and sustainability

    Scientists gathered to discuss the future of synthetic biology and how it can help curb climate change and promote sustainability.

  • Leaders pledge to address climate change

    A roundtable at the White House on reducing the health care industry’s climate-warming emissions includes leaders from Stanford Medicine.

  • Ami Bhatt on gut microbiomes

    The Stanford Medicine professor on why it’s important to better understand the microbiome of people transitioning from traditional to Westernized lifestyles.

  • Climate change and health

    The director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health explains how the medical community is at the center of the climate change debate.

  • Oil spill may put Yemeni health at risk

    An oil spill from the FSO Safer could increase cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and disrupt access to food and water for millions of people, researchers predict.

  • Wildfires and school ventilation

    With the COVID-19 pandemic and the growth of wildfires, California schools need to improve their air quality, according to Stanford pediatrician Lisa Patel. Fortunately, the funds are available.

  • Climate change lengthening allergy season

    Air levels of pollen and mold spores in the San Francisco Bay Area are elevated for about two more months per year than in past decades, and higher temperatures are to blame, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • High nitrate levels in water linked to preterm birth

    Women exposed to higher levels of nitrate in drinking water were more likely to deliver very early, according to a study of 1.4 million California births.

  • Researchers on wildfires’ health impacts

    California’s massive wildfires bring a host of health concerns. In a Q&A, Kari Nadeau and Mary Prunicki of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford discuss the threats posed by air pollution from the fires.


Related Websites