Neurology & Neurosurgery

  • Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • With gift, Alzheimer’s center renamed

    In addition to supporting the nationally recognized research center, the Good Planet Foundation has endowed a professorship in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

  • Once-nightly narcolepsy drug is effective

    A phase 3 study has found that an extended-release version of sodium oxybate reduces daytime sleepiness and attacks of muscle weakness in narcolepsy patients.

  • A new view of memory’s building blocks

    Stanford neuroscientists find that initial memory formation may involve both awareness of our location as well as what we were feeling when we were there.

  • Evidence COVID-19 causes brain inflammation

    A detailed molecular analysis of tissue from the brains of individuals who died of COVID-19 reveals extensive signs of inflammation and neurodegeneration, but no sign of the virus that causes the disease.

  • Face, brain development share many genes

    Researchers at Stanford and KU Leuven have identified more than 70 genes that affect variation in both brain and facial structure. The genes don’t influence cognitive ability, further debunking beliefs that intelligence can be assessed by facial features.

  • Study reveals immune driver of brain aging

    Scientists have identified a key factor in mental aging and shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system’s front-line soldiers.

  • High-risk, high-reward grants for researchers

    Annelise Barron, Peter Kim, Siddhartha Jaiswal and Keren Haroush will receive grants totaling $10 million to fund their investigations. The awards support risky efforts that could potentially have a big impact in the biomedical sciences.

  • Neuronal abnormalities in schizophrenia

    A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why.

  • Brain circuitry of dissociation

    Stanford scientists identified brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their bodies and reality.

  • Michael Lim to head neurosurgery

    Lim, a clinician, surgeon and researcher at Johns Hopkins who has focused largely on immunotherapy for brain tumors, will succeed Gary Steinberg as chair of the department, starting Sept. 1.


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