Immunology

  • In a study of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine doses given at Stanford Medicine, vaccine allergies were rare, mild and mostly triggered by a vaccine additive, not the mRNA.

  • Severe COVID-19, autoantibodies linked

    A study spearheaded by Stanford researchers indicates that at least 1 in 5 hospitalized COVID-19 patients develops new antibodies that attack their own tissue within a week of admission.

  • COVID-19 symptoms and prior common colds

    In COVID-19 patients whose symptoms were mild, Stanford researchers found that they were more likely than sicker patients to have signs of prior infection by similar, less virulent coronaviruses.

  • COVID-19 antibody treatment now available

    An infusion of monoclonal antibodies can ease COVID-19 symptoms and reduce complications in recently diagnosed, non-hospitalized people at high risk. Now people can refer themselves.

  • Climate change lengthening allergy season

    Air levels of pollen and mold spores in the San Francisco Bay Area are elevated for about two more months per year than in past decades, and higher temperatures are to blame, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • Promote vaccination, not herd immunity

    Epidemiology expert Julie Parsonnet warns that COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy has probably made herd immunity unattainable, which makes vaccination all the more important for personal health.

  • Making medicine out of RNA

    Ribonucleic acid, a key player in cellular protein production, is used, with increasing success, by biotechnologists bent on preventing and curing diseases.

  • Researchers on wildfires’ health impacts

    California’s massive wildfires bring a host of health concerns. In a Q&A, Kari Nadeau and Mary Prunicki of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford discuss the threats posed by air pollution from the fires.

  • Immune deviations seen in severe COVID-19 cases

    A Stanford study shows that in severely ill COVID-19 patients, “first-responder” immune cells, which should react immediately to signs of viruses or bacteria in the body, instead respond sluggishly.

  • $1.49 million for inflammation research

    The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative has awarded $1.49 million to research projects involving Stanford Medicine scientists who will investigate emerging ideas about the role of inflammation in disease.

  • HIV vaccine proves effective in primates

    Most vaccines direct the adaptive immune system to fight off infections with one arm tied behind its back. A new study in monkeys untied the other arm.

  • New members of the National Academy of Sciences

    Howard Chang of dermatology and of genetics, Richard Lewis of molecular and cellular physiology, and Peter Sarnow of microbiology and immunology were elected to the National Academy of Sciences.


Related Websites