Microbiology

  • The microbiologist, on the faculty for nearly half a century, studied a wide range of topics, including antibiotic resistance, cancer, and bacteria as an agent for cleaning up toxic chemicals.

  • Microbiomes are personal

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues tracked the gut, mouth, nose and skin bacteria of 86 people for as long as six years to try to gauge what constitutes a healthy microbiome.

  • Tissue mapping

    Stanford Medicine scientists describe details of the human intestine and placental tissue as part of the National Institute of Health’s Human Biomolecular Atlas Program.

  • mRNA vaccine beats infection

    Stanford Medicine researchers have shown that prior SARS-CoV-2 infection reduces killer T cells’ response to vaccination. These cells are crucial for eliminating the virus from the body.

  • One-and-done COVID-19 drug successful

    A single dose of lambda-interferon reduced hospitalization among COVID-19 outpatients in a late-stage study spearheaded by a Stanford Medicine virologist.

  • Telomere length crucial in muscular dystrophy

    Telomeres shorten in heart muscle cells from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A Stanford Medicine study finds blocking this process improves the health of these cells grown in a dish.

  • Mark Davis on immunology research

    Vaccinology has taken great leaps forward in the past decade, largely due to advanced analytical methods as well as a shift in researchers’ focus from rodents to humans.

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Bacteria that digest breast milk in decline

    Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues found that as nations industrialize, a species of bacteria critical in the early development of infant gut microbiomes fades away.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • Fiber supplements’ effects differ

    Researchers found that one fiber supplement seemed helpful while another appeared harmful — but study participants’ reactions varied.

  • Monack named Microbiology and Immunology chair

    Monack, whose research focuses on interactions between microbial pathogens and the immune system during infections, succeeds David Schneider.


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