Genetics

  • The solution to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could lie in every man’s genome. Stanford Medicine researchers take a step toward genetically personalized cancer screening.

  • Genes linked to brain cancer

    An international effort led by a Stanford Medicine researcher finds more than 50 genes linked to glioma — a rare brain cancer. Although most gliomas are sporadic, a minority are inherited.

  • How beneficial fats increase lifespan

    Fat from olive oil and nuts boosts the numbers of two key cellular structures and protects membranes from damage, lengthening the lives of laboratory worms, Stanford Medicine-led study finds.

  • How statins improve vascular health

    Statins designed to lower cholesterol have long been noted to work in mysterious ways to improve other aspects of cardiovascular health. A Stanford Medicine-led study uncovers how they do it.

  • DNA circles drive cancer development

    Tiny circles of DNA harbor cancer-associated oncogenes and immunomodulatory genes promoting cancer development. They arise during transformation from pre-cancer to cancer, say Stanford Medicine-led team.

  • Myc-caused sugar changes protect cancers

    A novel Stanford School of Medicine partnership uncovers a direct link between a cancer-associated gene, Myc, and sugar patterns on cancer cell surfaces that tell immune cells to stand down.

  • African-American Alzheimer’s risk factor

    A genetic risk factor found virtually exclusively among people of at least partial African ancestry substantially boosts the risk of incurring Alzheimer’s disease — but only sometimes.

  • Telomere length crucial in muscular dystrophy

    Telomeres shorten in heart muscle cells from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A Stanford Medicine study finds blocking this process improves the health of these cells grown in a dish.

  • Diabetes drug may treat heart disease

    A genetic variant that inhibits alcohol metabolism harms blood vessel cells, but an antidiabetic medication may mitigate the harm, Stanford Medicine-led research has found.

  • Blood drop yields lots of data

    Using a new technique called multi-omic microsampling, Stanford Medicine researchers can measure thousands of protein, fat and metabolic molecules from a single drop of blood.

  • $18 million for transplant and gene-editing research

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has funded Stanford Medicine projects to improve kidney transplantation and advance treatment for a rare genetic disease in children.

  • Gel treatment heals blistering wounds

    Researchers find that a gel tested in patients with a life-threatening blistering skin disease helps wounds heal. The gel — the first topical gene therapy — awaits FDA approval.


Related Websites