Pathology

  • The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • William Weis dies at 64

    William Weis, PhD, former chair of structural biology at Stanford Medicine, refined advanced imaging techniques and described the three-dimensional structure of many cellular components.

  • Real-time targeting of tumors

    New technology combines radiotherapy with real-time detection of cancer cells to target moving tumors or multiple metastases. Stanford Medicine is the first to research the technology in the clinic.

  • Cyclotron director dies at 43

    The director of the Stanford Medicine cyclotron and radiochemistry facility died on Jan. 25. He created novel radiotracers for clinical and research use.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.

  • Garry Gold appointed chair of radiology

    Garry Gold, who specializes in understanding osteoarthritis via MRI, has been appointed chair of the Department of Radiology, embracing a vision of early disease detection.

  • William Northway dies at 89

    The Stanford pediatric radiologist, after noticing a new and disturbing pattern among lung X-rays of premature infants, forever altered treatment for the smallest babies.

  • COVID-19 nasal spray vaccine

    A potential COVID-19 vaccine, delivered via a squirt up the nose, shows promise in mice.

  • Sanjiv Sam Gambhir dies at 57

    The professor and chair of radiology at Stanford was a global leader in advancing techniques for molecular imaging and early cancer detection.

  • Radiologist Leslie Zatz dies at 91

    Zatz was a radiologist ahead of his time, envisioning the framework behind some of today’s most advanced practices in radiology and AI-powered diagnostics.

  • AI to help detect brain aneurysms

    Radiologists improved their diagnoses of brain aneurysms with the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by Stanford medical experts and computer scientists.

  • Algorithm success in screening for disease

    In a matter of seconds, a new algorithm read chest X-rays for 14 pathologies, performing as well as radiologists in most cases, a Stanford-led study says.


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