Innovation & Technology

  • The FDA recently approved the first cell-based therapy — widely used in treating blood cancers — for solid tumors. Stanford Medicine treated the first patient with advanced melanoma.

  • Stanford Medicine magazine on psychiatry

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine reports on emerging research and innovative treatments to improve mental health.

  • Studying neurodevelopmental disorders

    Stanford Medicine research on Timothy syndrome — which predisposes newborns to autism and epilepsy — may extend well beyond the rare genetic disorder to schizophrenia and other conditions.

  • Chuck Chan dies at 48

    The Stanford Medicine researcher was known for his groundbreaking work and his generous spirit as a mentor and colleague.

  • AI models help clinician communication

    A new artificial intelligence model helps physicians and nurses work together at Stanford Hospital to boost patient care.

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.

  • AI helps with patient emails

    Stanford Medicine study shows that large language models can lend a hand to clinicians in responding to patient email messages.

  • AI helps with clinical notes

    Stanford Medicine integrates AI-powered listening technology that takes notes for health care providers, allowing them to spend more time with patients and less time on administrative tasks.

  • Digital health's future

    Digital Health 2024 drew more than 200 attendees to hear from dozens of speakers on a range of topics at the intersection of health and digital technology.

  • Augmented reality in the OR

    Stanford Medicine physician uses augmented reality to streamline data visualization during surgery.

  • Women’s and men’s brain patterns differ

    Stanford Medicine researchers have developed a powerful new artificial intelligence model that can distinguish between male and female brains.

  • AI helps manage Type 2 diabetes

    A new study led by Stanford Medicine indicates that an AI app can help Type 2 diabetic patients manage their blood glucose levels.


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