COVID-19

  • People with mild to moderate COVID-19 can shed viral RNA in their feces months after initial infection, Stanford researchers find. Those who do often have nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

  • Students create low-tech antiviral method

    Using household items, Stanford students have developed a way to make affordable nasal drops with the potential to slow the spread of viruses like COVID-19.

  • Vaccines bolster immunity from prior infection

    Two-dose COVID-19 vaccines significantly increase protection against hospitalization and death in people who had the illness before they were immunized.

  • The pandemic turns 2

    Stanford Medicine scientists explain what we know, and what we don’t know, about living with COVID-19 two years after the World Health Organization declared a pandemic.

  • Lab processes 1 millionth COVID-19 test

    Stanford Medicine’s clinical virology laboratory has processed its 1 millionth COVID-19 test nearly two years after becoming one of the first academic center testing sites in the country.

  • Vaccination protects better than infection

    COVID-19 vaccines are better than infection at making antibodies to recognize new viral variants, according to a Stanford study.

  • Cancer drug renders COVID vaccine ineffective

    Rituximab, a drug widely used in patients with lymphoma, blunts or eliminates the antibody response to COVID-19 vaccines if it is administered before them, Stanford researchers say.

  • Antibodies may predict COVID-19 severity

    A look at antibodies in patients soon after they were infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 showed key differences between those whose cases remained mild and those who later developed severe symptoms.

  • Grant for faculty family care

    The Doris Duke foundation has awarded the Stanford School of Medicine $550,000 to aid physician-scientists with family caregiving responsibilities heightened by COVID-19.

  • Surgery rates rebounded quickly in pandemic

    After a dramatic drop in nonessential surgery rates early in the pandemic, U.S. hospitals quickly adapted to new safety protocols, and rates returned to normal, Stanford Medicine research shows.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.

  • Smartwatch stress alerts

    Stanford Medicine researchers created an algorithm to notify smartwatch wearers of stress, capturing events such as air travel, extended exercise and illness.