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Excellence in Scientific Discovery

The Institute's comprehensive investigations extend from the earliest phase of basic discovery to the development of new cancer diagnostics, treatment protocols and prevention strategies

Research Programs

Basic, clinical and translational studies into the biology of cancer and the factors that contribute to its onset and growth.


Shared Resources

The most sophisticated technologies and research protocols are offered to SCI members through a number of core facilities.


Key Initiatives

Inter-disciplinary teams of collaborative investigators partner to foster discovery, application and translation of scientific knowledge.


Institute Membership

Scientists and physicians from a wide range of disciplines, all dedicated to reducing the burden of cancer.


News & Publications

Publications, press releases and news are shared with scientists, physicians, patients and friends of the Institute.


Funding Opportunities

Internal and external sources of support for both established cancer research programs and promising new ideas.  


Clinical Trial Support

The Cancer Clinical Trials Office provides regulatory and administrative services to SCI members conducting clinical trials.  


Training Opportunities

Education and professional development designed to train the next generation of cancer researchers and physicians.



National Cancer Institute Designation

News & Publications

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.