Cancer

  • The collaboration will enable the development of medications to treat a type of brain cancer.

  • Shoshana Levy dies

    Shoshana Levy discovered a family of molecules called tetraspanins, launching a new field of cancer research. She was an active researcher, collaborator and mentor at Stanford Medicine for nearly three decades.

  • Possible new way to kill cancer cells

    After finding long, repetitive sequences in the genomes of seven kinds of cancer, researchers at Stanford Medicine and their colleagues developed a molecule that curbed their production.

  • Hepatitis C treatment low

    Antiviral medicine eliminates hepatitis C in 97% of patients, but Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues find that many don’t receive the treatment.

  • New National Academy of Medicine members

    Grace Lee, Crystal Mackall, Paul Mischel, Kari Nadeau, Anthony Oro and Krishna Shenoy are among the 100 members elected this year to the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Hodgkin lymphoma pioneer Rosenberg dies

    Rosenberg combined radiation and chemotherapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma, revolutionizing cancer care. He taught at Stanford Medicine for more than 50 years.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Small increase in risk with prostate radiation

    Receiving radiation for prostate cancer increases the risk of other cancers very slightly, Stanford Medicine researchers find, allowing providers to better inform patients weighing treatment options.

  • Stanford Health Care among nation’s top hospitals

    For eighth year running, U.S. News & World Report ranks Stanford Health Care one of the nation’s highest-rated hospitals.

  • Targeting enzyme that fuels cancer cells

    Stanford Medicine researchers have created a molecule that blocks an enzyme thought to be instrumental in causing colon cancer relapse or chemotherapy resistance.

  • $13 million for cancer research

    The funding, from Cancer Grand Challenges, will help the researchers address difficult problems in cancer prevention, treatment-resistant cancers and therapies for pediatric solid tumors.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.


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