Cancer

  • The solution to the overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer could lie in every man’s genome. Stanford Medicine researchers take a step toward genetically personalized cancer screening.

  • Genes linked to brain cancer

    An international effort led by a Stanford Medicine researcher finds more than 50 genes linked to glioma — a rare brain cancer. Although most gliomas are sporadic, a minority are inherited.

  • Distracting videos ease kids’ radiotherapy

    Most children receiving radiation therapy for cancer can hold still without anesthesia if they watch videos during the treatment, a study of a technique developed at Stanford Medicine found.

  • Antibiotics linked to poorer cancer survival

    Triple-negative breast cancer patients who used antibiotics within three years of diagnosis have an increased risk of death, according to a study. The gut microbiome is a likely link.

  • Skin-colonizing bacteria help fight tumors

    In a study led by Stanford Medicine, researchers harnessed the skin’s immune response to bacteria to create an immunotherapy — delivered by swab — that treats aggressive tumors in mice.

  • DNA circles drive cancer development

    Tiny circles of DNA harbor cancer-associated oncogenes and immunomodulatory genes promoting cancer development. They arise during transformation from pre-cancer to cancer, say Stanford Medicine-led team.

  • Myc-caused sugar changes protect cancers

    A novel Stanford School of Medicine partnership uncovers a direct link between a cancer-associated gene, Myc, and sugar patterns on cancer cell surfaces that tell immune cells to stand down.

  • Cancer cells become cancer cure

    Researchers found that when they turned cancer cells into immune cells, they were able to teach other immune cells how to attack cancer.

  • Immune cells become cancer killers

    Neutrophils often suppress the immune system’s response to cancer, but when activated, they eliminate several types of tumors in laboratory mice, a study led by Stanford Medicine has found.

  • Stanford and Invus collaborate

    The collaboration will enable the development of medications to treat a type of brain cancer.

  • Shoshana Levy dies

    Shoshana Levy discovered a family of molecules called tetraspanins, launching a new field of cancer research. She was an active researcher, collaborator and mentor at Stanford Medicine for nearly three decades.

  • Possible new way to kill cancer cells

    After finding long, repetitive sequences in the genomes of seven kinds of cancer, researchers at Stanford Medicine and their colleagues developed a molecule that curbed their production.


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