In the News

January

Patient Engagement HIT, 01/09/20

--5 principles to build positive patient-provider relationships

Stanford researchers say they have identified five practices that doctors can implement to achieve more meaningful interactions with patients. Lead author Donna Zulman, assistant professor of medicine, and senior author Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, are quoted in this article.

 

Stanford Medicine press release, 01/07/20

--Stanford researchers recommend 5 practices to improve doctor-patient relationships

Stanford researchers say they have identified five practices that doctors can implement to achieve more meaningful interactions with patients. Donna Zulman, assistant professor of medicine, is lead author of the paper, and Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, is senior author of the paper.

 

New York Times, 01/02/20

--Why are you publicly sharing your child’s DNA information?

There is a growing interest in genotyping children. This opinion piece discusses how parents are exposing their personal health data by uploading their children’s genetic information on public websites. Louanne Hudgins, professor of pediatrics, provides comment.

 

Medscape, 01/02/20

--Bringing humanity back is the 'greatest gift AI can give'

In this episode of Medicine and the Machine podcast, Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, and Eric Topol discuss the loss of humanity in medicine, and how AI offers an exciting opportunity to bring time and presence back to patient care.

Read More in SCBE News

Advanced Health Care Directive

California law give you the ability to ensure that your health care wishes are known and considered if you become unable to make these decisions yourself. Completing a form called an “Advance Health Care Directive” allows you to do a number of things:

Appoint another person to be your health care “agent”

Delineate your health care wishes, such as:

  • Health care instructions, including life support, organ and tissue donation
  • Revoke prior directives

A sample form is attached for reference. Acknowledgment before a notary public is not required if two qualified witnesses have signed this Directive in Part 5. In other words this is a free legally binding document.

Upcoming Events

Biomedical Ethics Seminars
Tuesday, February 4
Laura Dunn, MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center
Topic: TBA

More events

Medicine & the Muse Program (Click here to learn more) 

Ways to Give Gifts

A gift may be made in the form of a check, securities, a bequest, or a complex trust arrangement designed to maximize tax advantages. Checks should be made payable to Stanford University.

For financial donations, please contact the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics at
650-723-5760.