31st Annual Jonathan J. King Lecture

Presented by Dr. Betty Ferrell

“The Future of Palliative Care After the Storm”

 
Join the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics for  our free webinar!


 Tuesday, October 05, 2021
at 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm PT. 


Click here to add to your calendar.

Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, MA, FAAN, FPCN, CHPN has been in nursing for 44 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in pain management, quality of life, and palliative care. Dr. Ferrell is the Director of Nursing Research & Education and a Professor at the City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, California. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and she has over 480 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts. She is Principal Investigator of the “End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)” project. She directs several other funded projects related to palliative care in cancer centers and QOL issues. Dr. Ferrell was Co-Chairperson of the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. Dr. Ferrell completed a Masters degree in Theology, Ethics and Culture from Claremont Graduate University in 2007. She has authored eleven books including the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing (5th Edition, 2019) published by Oxford University Press. She is co-author of the text, The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Nursing published in 2008 by Oxford University Press and Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care (Templeton Press, 2010). In 2013 Dr. Ferrell was named one of the 30 Visionaries in the field by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. In 2019 she was elected a member of the National Academy of Medicine. 

The Jonathan J. King Lectureship was established in 1991 to encourage the compassionate and humane care of all patients. It is part of Stanford Medicine’s mission to enhance patient treatment and the art of caring.


The Vision of Jonathan J. King

Three weeks before his death, Jonathan King defined the key messages he wished to bring to the attention of the medical community through these lectures.

  • The patient is your client and should be treated with respect. Seek out and give full weight to your patient’s suggestions and opinions on treatments. Never, ever treat your patient as an object or as a second class citizen.
  • Empathize. Put yourself in your patient’s shoes as much as you can, recognizing that a fatal or harsh diagnosis separates the patient from “ordinary” people.
  • Foster the patient’s feelings of control and hope, however small they appear scientifically.
  • Base this on a foundation of honesty. In other words, tell the whole truth from the start, but don’t fear or disparage your patient’s drive for alternatives; help assure they are sensible.
  • Help and urge the patient to build a support system. Urge the patient to bring a companion to office visits and other important events.
  • Encourage the patient to consult other sources of information (including other doctors) and always make medical records available.
  • Expect patients with a poor prognosis to alternate between “frantic” search for solutions followed by calm commitment to a plan. Be patient when your patient is frantic.
  • Make every extra positive gesture. They boost morale enormously and ease the feeling of being alone. Thoughtless comments rankle, and are likewise magnified.
  • Make physical surroundings and institutional arrangements — lighting, food, etc. — as pleasant as possible.
  • Support efforts to speed up attempts to apply promising but unproven treatments for patients with a fatal diagnosis.

Jonathan King Clip


Full Version: Jonathan King Ethics Class

(audio will require headphones or turning up volume setting)

Past King Lectures