Press Releases

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.

  • Lisa Wise-Faberowski dies at 57

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski, who studied a rare congenital heart condition as well as the effects of anesthesia on children’s developing brains, died at 57.

  • Marijuana can damage heart

    Marijuana use and heart-attack risk were correlated in a large human study, Stanford scientists and their collaborators found. A molecule in soybeans may counteract these effects.

  • Teens’ brains tuned to unfamiliar voices

    Around age 13, kids’ brains shift from focusing on their mothers’ voices to favor new voices, part of the biological signal driving teens to separate from their parents, a Stanford Medicine study has found.

  • Fiber supplements’ effects differ

    Researchers found that one fiber supplement seemed helpful while another appeared harmful — but study participants’ reactions varied.

  • Neurobiologist Denis Baylor dies at 82

    Baylor, former chair of the Department of Neurobiology, gained international recognition for discovering the electrical language used by the retina to translate light from the outside world into signals that the brain reads.

  • Electric current aids stroke recovery

    Stanford scientists have developed a device that delivers and electrically stimulates stem cells to promote stroke healing.

  • Living with handgun owner raises homicide risk

    Residents who don’t own a handgun but live with someone who does are significantly more likely to die by homicide compared with those in gun-free homes, research shows.

  • Vaccines bolster immunity from prior infection

    Two-dose COVID-19 vaccines significantly increase protection against hospitalization and death in people who had the illness before they were immunized.

  • Immunologist Samuel Strober dies at 81

    Strober, a professor and former chief of immunology and rheumatology, found a way for transplant recipients to reduce or abandon immunosuppressive drugs yet avoid organ rejection.


2021 ISSUE 2

Unlocking the secrets of the brain

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.