Press Releases

  • Moderna protective in prison outbreak

    A Stanford study at a California prison found that although there were more breakthrough COVID-19 infections than before the emergence of the delta variant, vaccinated prison residents had few symptomatic cases.

  • Blood test predicts hip-replacement recovery

    A simple blood test that analyzes immune function can forecast how quickly a person undergoing hip replacement surgery will recover.

  • J&J produces low antibody response

    In large study of dialysis patients, low immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson indicates that a booster shot might be needed.

  • Stanford Medicine magazine explores the brain and nervous system

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about developments in neuroscience and treatments for conditions affecting the brain and nervous system.

  • Oil spill may put Yemeni health at risk

    An oil spill from the FSO Safer could increase cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and disrupt access to food and water for millions of people, researchers predict.

  • Michelle Monje awarded 'genius grant'

    The neuroscientist and pediatric neuro-oncologist is being recognized for her work to understand healthy brain development and create therapies for a group of lethal brain tumors.

  • Karl Deisseroth wins Lasker award

    Discoveries by Deisseroth and his two co-recipients regarding microbial light-activated molecules led to his development of a way to manipulate selected neurons in living animals to observe changes in their behavior.

  • Insulin resistance increases depression risk

    About 1 in 3 American adults has insulin resistance, a silent time bomb that doubles their risk for serious depression, Stanford scientists have learned.

  • Parents want to know cost of kids’ hospitalizations

    Most parents with children in the hospital want to learn what the stay will cost, but few are having conversations about money with hospital representatives, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Allergies to COVID-19 vaccines mostly mild

    In a study of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine doses given at Stanford Medicine, vaccine allergies were rare, mild and mostly triggered by a vaccine additive, not the mRNA.


2021 ISSUE 2

Unlocking the secrets of the brain

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.