Press Releases

  • Hematologist Steven Coutre dies

    Steven Coutre was known for his research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his humility and his love of traveling and family.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.

  • Epidemiologist Jennifer Kelsey dies

    Kelsey was known for her teaching skills, her expertise in musculoskeletal disorders and her love of golden retrievers.

  • Identifying new types of cancer cells

    EcoTyper is an algorithm that can sort out cell “ecotypes” — distinct multicellular communities — that exist in many different kinds of cancer.

  • Moderna protective in prison outbreak

    A Stanford study at a California prison found that although there were more breakthrough COVID-19 infections than before the emergence of the delta variant, vaccinated prison residents had few symptomatic cases.

  • J&J produces low antibody response

    In large study of dialysis patients, low immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson indicates that a booster shot might be needed.

  • Oil spill may put Yemeni health at risk

    An oil spill from the FSO Safer could increase cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations and disrupt access to food and water for millions of people, researchers predict.

  • Parents want to know cost of kids’ hospitalizations

    Most parents with children in the hospital want to learn what the stay will cost, but few are having conversations about money with hospital representatives, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Allergies to COVID-19 vaccines mostly mild

    In a study of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine doses given at Stanford Medicine, vaccine allergies were rare, mild and mostly triggered by a vaccine additive, not the mRNA.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers