Press Releases

  • Understanding ‘chemo brain’

    Three types of cells in the brain’s white matter show interwoven problems during the cognitive dysfunction that follows treatment with the cancer drug methotrexate, Stanford neuroscientists have found.


  • Possible zinc strategy for diabetes

    To treat diabetes directly, rather than manage its symptoms, doctors need a way to get drugs to cells that produce insulin. The key, Stanford researchers report, may be those cells’ affinity for zinc.


  • What sea invertebrate reveals about us

    A lowly sea creature may provide a way to understand our own blood-forming system, improve our immune function and find new immune-associated tools for biological discovery, Stanford researchers say.


  • Bee-made protein keeps stem cells primed

    An active protein component of royal jelly helps honeybees create new queens. Stanford researchers have identified a similar protein in mammals, which keeps cultured embryonic stem cells pluripotent.


  • Dental opioids and youth addiction

    In teenagers and young adults, receiving opioids from dental providers is linked with elevated risk for continued opioid use and abuse, a Stanford study has found.


  • Possible therapy for surgical adhesions

    Fibrous adhesions that form after abdominal surgery may be preventable or treatable, according to Stanford study. Adhesions affect most surgical patients, and treating them costs over $1 billion annually.


  • Home videos for autism diagnosis

    Algorithms generated through machine learning can sort through observations of children’s behavior in short home videos to determine if the children have autism, a Stanford study has shown.


  • Algorithm success in screening for disease

    In a matter of seconds, a new algorithm read chest X-rays for 14 pathologies, performing as well as radiologists in most cases, a Stanford-led study says.


  • Stanford Medicine magazine and high-tech

    Stanford Medicine is applying high-tech approaches to reshape medical research, training, diagnostics and treatment — without losing the essential human touch.


  • Farming linked to gut microbiome changes

    Researchers at Stanford and several other institutions have linked the gut ecosystems of four Himalayan groups to the extent of each group’s departure from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle.



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