Press Releases

  • Shedding light on exercise’s effects

    A Stanford Medicine-led effort to learn more about exercise’s molecular effects paints the broadest picture yet of why, in the health arena, sweat is king.

  • Studying neurodevelopmental disorders

    Stanford Medicine research on Timothy syndrome — which predisposes newborns to autism and epilepsy — may extend well beyond the rare genetic disorder to schizophrenia and other conditions.

  • New epilepsy target

    Researchers find that a little-understood part of the brain appears to be involved in starting seizures and keeping them going.

  • Psychosis starts in two brain systems

    When the brain has trouble filtering incoming information and predicting what’s likely to happen, psychosis can result, Stanford Medicine-led research shows.

  • Unexpected cells may spread COVID-19

    A previously overlooked type of immune cell allows SARS-CoV-2 to proliferate, Stanford Medicine scientists have found. The discovery has important implications for preventing severe COVID-19.

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.

  • Alistair Philip dies at 86

    Alistair Philip, professor emeritus of pediatrics, pioneered a test to reduce antibiotic use in newborns, streamlined nursery care at several hospitals and devoted his life to educating others in his field.

  • Bill Marshall dies at 92

    The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers