News & Research

  • Alvin Hackel dies at 91

    The Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of anesthesiology and of pediatrics invented a transport incubator for newborns and helped establish pediatric anesthesiology as a specialty.

  • Cancer neuroscience discoveries give hope

    To drive their growth, many tumors hijack nervous system signals, including those needed for brain plasticity. Stanford Medicine discoveries are opening a promising new branch of oncology research.

  • Diet choices can lower carbon footprint

    Stanford Medicine researchers and their colleagues have identified simple food swaps that, if adopted universally, could reduce the nation’s food-related carbon footprint by more than a third. The changes are also more healthy.

  • African Americans less likely to be screened

    National guidelines for lung cancer screening are less effective for African Americans than for whites, Stanford study concludes. A risk-based analysis is more equitable and effective.

  • NPs, physicians equally safe at prescribing

    A study at Stanford Medicine has found that nurse practitioners prescribe as safely as primary care physicians while caring for seniors.

  • Lung cancer cells protected by brain cells

    Small cell lung cancers often metastasize to the brain. A Stanford Medicine study shows they thrive there by emulating developing neurons and recruiting surrounding cells for protection.

  • How ketamine treats depression

    In an unusual trial, Stanford Medicine researchers found that a patient’s belief that they had received ketamine, even if they didn’t, could improve their depression.

  • Eye fluid study may foster treatments

    Stanford Medicine researchers clock the age of cells to find new therapy targets.

  • Virtual reality therapy for hoarding disorder

    A first-of-its-kind study by Stanford Medicine researchers lets patients practice letting go of treasured objects in simulations of their own homes.

  • AMA Joy in Medicine honor

    Stanford Medicine was recognized by the American Medical Association for commitment to improving physician professional fulfillment.

  • Why young kids don’t get severe COVID

    Children’s noses pack a punch that could help explain COVID-19’s typically mild course in young kids. Researchers hope to parlay that ‘nasal magic’ into increased protections for adults.

  • Drug boosts nerve growth, muscle strength

    A drug that boosts strength in injured or aging mice restores connections between nerves and muscle and suggests ways to combat weakness in humans due to aging, injury or disease.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care


Other Stanford
Medicine News

February 21, 2024 – Stanford News

A new RNA editing tool could enhance cancer treatment

The new study found that an RNA-targeting CRISPR platform could tune immune cell metabolism without permanent genetic changes, potentially unveiling a relatively low-risk way to upgrade existing cell therapies for cancer.

February 21, 2024 – SPARK Stanford

SPARK publishes manuscript in Nature Biotechnology

SPARK has published a paper in the journal Nature Biotechnology describing the unique community and methods the program has developed to address challenges in translating academic discoveries to medical products.

February 20, 2024 – Stanford HAI

In Cardiology Trial, Doctors Receptive to AI Collaboration

Doctors worked with a prototype AI assistant and adapted their diagnoses based on AI’s input, which led to better clinical decisions.

February 20, 2024 – Department of Medicine

A New Era of Cardiovascular Care: Insights from Dr. Joseph Wu

As we observe American Heart Month this February, Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, shares his insights into the current state of cardiovascular medicine and what the future might hold for treating and preventing heart disease.

January 30, 2024 – Global Health

Equipping doctors to save lives when resources are scarce

Stanford Surgeon Sherry Wren’s International Humanitarian Surgical Skills Course, now in its tenth year at Stanford, has equipped hundreds of surgeons and healthcare providers with the unique skills and knowledge they need to save lives in conflict zones and low-resource settings.

January 16 – Stanford Report

IntroSem reveals the magic of medical imaging

An introductory seminar dives into the technologies behind the shadowy photos of anatomy that give clinicians a window into our most personal of spaces.

January 4, 2024 – Stanford Report

Faculty symposium supports a more equitable professoriate

The Next Generation Symposium uses more than its namesake event to improve representation among STEM faculty. The effort also promotes and supports early-career scientists through mentorship, community, and a reimagining of the faculty search process.

November 2, 2023 – School of Humanities and Sciences

Stanford introduces medical humanities minor

Combining the field of medicine with art, literature, film, history, policy, and the social sciences, a team of Stanford professors has shaped a new undergradua

October 31, 2023 – Global Health

Announcing a new global health scholars program for African Physicians

The Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health launched a new Stanford Global Health African Scholars Program on Nov. 1 to promote health equity, capacity-strengthening, and unique focused learning between African medical institutions and Stanford.

October 17, 2023 – Global Health

Perspective: It's time to prepare for the potential return of yellow fever

Mosquito-transmitted virus infections are on the rise and their spread is accelerating in Texas, Florida and elsewhere in the American South.

October 9, 2023 – Radiology

New Photon Counting CT (PCCT) Prototype Installed

A new prototype GE HealthCare photon counting CT (PCCT) scanner has been installed at 3155 Porter Drive, only the second such scanner in the United States.


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