Latest information on COVID-19

In the News

April 

Time, 04/02/20

--You Probably Read About an Uninsured Teen Who Died of COVID-19. The Truth Is More Complicated

Michelle Mello, a professor of law and medicine, provides comment on the gap between what’s moral and what’s legal and why it matters.

 

MedScape, 04/02/20

--'Our Job Is to Save as Many People as Possible,' ICU Doc Says

Abraham Verghese speaks with Angela J. Rogers, MD, MPH, to tell us why this disease should bring such focus on the ICU. And what she has had to learn and do in order to scale up and be ready for what might come next.

 

Mercury News, 04/02/20

--Coronavirus: Restaurants’ donated meals for Bay Area hospitals keep cooks, others employed

It’s a win-win, with health-care workers, chefs, servers and farmers all benefitting. On the Peninsula, organic restaurant pioneer Jesse Ziff Cool said a light bulb went off when Stanford University bioethicist and associate professor Holly Tabor asked her if there was a way for Cool’s restaurants to rev up again and help with meals.


Stanford Daily, 04/01/20

--Professor and restaurateur team up to donate meals to Stanford Hospital staff

Meals of Gratitude, co-founded by Holly Tabor Ph.D. ’02 and local restaurateur Jesse Cool on March 17, is now serving 1,000 meals per week to Stanford Health Care workers. The organization has raised more than $60,000 in donations toward the effort.

 

March

NPR, 03/31/20 

--Are Hospitals Seeing A Surge Of Coronavirus Patients? Some Officials Aren't Saying

With tests scarce, epidemiologists are looking at hospitalizations as an indicator of how the novel coronavirus is spreading. But in some of the areas of the country worst-hit by COVID-19, states and counties aren't releasing that data. Steven Goodman provides comment.

 

The U.S. Sun, 03/31/20

--DOUBLE TROUBLE Flu symptoms could be masking signs of coronavirus, docs warn

FLU symptoms could be masking signs of coronavirus, doctors have warned. Research suggests that around one in five people with Covid-19 may also be infected with other respiratory viruses. Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, provides comment.


Vox, 03/31/20

--The grim ethical dilemma of rationing medical care, explained

How hospitals decide which Covid-19 patients to prioritize when resources are scarce. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

 

Daily Post, 03/30/20

--County’s new tool to monitor COVID-19 spread is missing key information

Santa Clara County’s Public Health Department on Friday launched a new way people can see data about COVID-19, however, the new site is missing information on how many people with the virus are hospitalized. Stanford Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine Steven Goodman provides comment.



Raw Story, 03/30/20

--Heading HereFrom China to Trump — the bungling of the coronavirus testing crisis started at the beginning: report

From the very beginning of the coronavirus crisis, things were bungled. In an extensive fact-check, the Washington Post walked through the timeline from the early days of the Chinese outbreak to President Donald Trump’s efforts in the United States today. Michelle Mello, professor of law and of medicine, provides comment.

 

The Takeaway, 03/30/20

--What Constitutes an Elective Procedure?

The Takeaway spoke to Dr. Alyssa Burgart, a bioethicist at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, about the debate over whether or not to cancel elective procedures, what it means for hospitals to stop them, and how we even define these types of procedures.

 

KQED, 3/30/20

--The Medical Ethics of the Coronavirus Pandemic

As the coronavirus crisis continues to strain medical systems, hospital ethics committees face difficult choices of how to allocate limited medical resources like testing kits, ventilators and staff. We'll hear from experts on the medical ethics questions being considered during this pandemic. David Magnus, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

 

Sports Illustrated, 03/30/20

--Is It Wrong for Baseball Players to Get Tommy John Surgery?

Pro athletes are already under fire for preferential treatment during the coronavirus crisis—and medical ethicists say this is another example. David Magnus, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

 

Stanford Medicine News, 03/29/20

--COVID-19 patients often infected with other respiratory viruses, preliminary study reports

About 1 in 5 people with COVID-19 are also infected with other respiratory viruses, according to a preliminary analysis led by Ian Brown, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine. Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, is also quoted in this story.

 

San Francisco Chronicle, 03/28/20

--Coronavirus slowing in Bay Area? Experts track data to see whether shelter in place is working

By day’s end Monday, most of the Bay Area will have been holed up in their homes for two weeks — long enough, experts say, to see whether the unprecedented efforts to keep people apart are beginning to halt, or at least slow down, the coronavirus. Steve Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research and policy, associate dean of clinical and translational research, and co-director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, provides comment.

 

Medscape, 03/27/20

--Stanford Hospitalist: 'What I Wish I'd Known 2 Weeks Ago'

Even with warning, the surge of COVID-19 patients came faster than expected, and hospitalists may need to be ready for 70% loss of staff availability, says Stanford's chief of hospital medicine. Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, speaks with Neera Ahuja, who heads the hospital medicine division at Stanford University.



KQED, 03/25/20

--What Happens When the Ventilators Run Out?

Ethics committees at Bay Area hospitals are discussing how they will ration care if medical resources become scarce. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

 

Just Security, 03/18/20

--Moral Courage in the Coronavirus: A Guide for Medical Providers and Institutions

If you are a leader at a healthcare institution, what can you do to facilitate moral agency and moral courage by healthcare providers? Bioethicists Alyssa Burgart and Holly Tabor tackle the question head on.


KPIX, 03/25/20

--Stanford Health Expert: Hospitalization Figures, Not Positive Cases, Best Indicator Of COVID-19

Santa Clara County may have seen its largest single-day increase in positive COVID-19 cases, but one Bay Area doctor said Wednesday the number that gives a better sense of what is happening with the pandemic are the hospitalizations. Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research and policy, provides comment.

 

KQED, 03/25/20

--What Happens When the Ventilators Run Out?

Ethics Committees at Bay Area hospitals are discussing how they will ration care if medical resources become scarce. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

Vermont Conversation, 03/11/20

--“This is an impending catastrophe:” Stanford epidemiologist Steve Goodman on the coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is sweeping across the globe and has arrived in Vermont. Stanford epidemiologist Steve Goodman discusses the uniquely dangerous dimensions of this new pandemic, the botched federal response, the impact of the Trump Administration’s misinformation, and why he calls COVID-19 “a tsunami.”

 

Washington Post, 03/16/20

--How U.S. coronavirus testing stalled: Flawed tests, red tape and resistance to using the millions of tests produced by the WHO

This article looks at some of factors attributed to early coronavirus testing delays. Michelle Mello, professor of law and medicine, provides comment.

 

USA Today, 03/06/20

--Keeping coronavirus patients anonymous is crucial to battling the outbreak

This piece by Alyssa Burgart, clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, speaks about the importance of cancelling elective surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Scope, 03/12/20

--Even if you are virus-free, COVID-19 is affecting your health. Here’s what to do

Are your healthy habits succumbing to coronavirus? In this post, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, offers some tips to stay safe and protect your well-being amid the outbreak.

 

The Hill, 3/11/20

--Response to coronavirus could test limits of government powers

Coronavirus lockdowns abroad are raising questions about the upper limits of government power as health officials in the U.S. and around the world scramble to slow the spread of infection. Michelle Mello, professor of law and medicine, is quoted.

 

USA Today, 03/06/20

--Keeping coronavirus patients anonymous is crucial to battling the outbreak

In this California epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, officials say they are trying to be as transparent as possible. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment.

 

Newsweek, 03/06/20

--U.S. coronavirus outbreak puts those without paid suck leave in 'near-impossible situation,' experts warn

A spike in the number of cases of the new coronavirus in the U.S. has reignited the debate around paid sick leave. Medical experts warn the current situation could exacerbate the spread of COVID-19 by dissuading people to take time off work. Professor of pediatrics and of medicine; and Michelle Mello, professor of law and of medicine, provides comment. She also provides comment on media coverage surrounding coronavirus on KCBS Radio.

 

Read More in SCBE News

Advanced Health Care Directive

California law give you the ability to ensure that your health care wishes are known and considered if you become unable to make these decisions yourself. Completing a form called an “Advance Health Care Directive” allows you to do a number of things:

Appoint another person to be your health care “agent”

Delineate your health care wishes, such as:

  • Health care instructions, including life support, organ and tissue donation
  • Revoke prior directives

A sample form is attached for reference. Acknowledgment before a notary public is not required if two qualified witnesses have signed this Directive in Part 5. In other words this is a free legally binding document.

Upcoming Events

COVID-19 Ethics Webinar
with Alyssa Burgart & John Lantos
Thursday, April 2
@ 1pm

Biomedical Ethics Seminars
CANCELLED: Tuesday, April 7, 2020
R. Alta Charo, JD

More events

Medicine & the Muse Program (Click here to learn more) 

Ways to Give Gifts

A gift may be made in the form of a check, securities, a bequest, or a complex trust arrangement designed to maximize tax advantages. Checks should be made payable to Stanford University.

For financial donations, please contact the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics at
650-723-5760.