In the News

February

Scope, 02/21/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Going gluten-free

In the fifth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, analyzes the gluten-free diet.

 

Scope, 02/14/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: How ketogenic should you go?

In the fourth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examines pros and cons of a ketogenic diet.

 

CNN.com, 02/12/19

--Facebook screens posts for suicide risk, and health experts have concerns

Facebook continues to refine its efforts to identify and help people who may be considering self-harm, but experts have found transparency and ethical problems with the social media platform’s latest tools and guidelines. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is quoted in this story.

 

Forbes, 02/11/19

--Rethinking medical ethics

Traditional medical ethics are being challenged by developments such as AI. Danton Char, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, is mentioned here.

 

Scope, 02/07/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Vegetarian is healthy if you tread carefully

In the third piece in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, point out the pros and cons of a vegetarian diet.

 

Read More in SCBE News

Advanced Health Care Directive

California law give you the ability to ensure that your health care wishes are known and considered if you become unable to make these decisions yourself. Completing a form called an “Advance Health Care Directive” allows you to do a number of things:

Appoint another person to be your health care “agent”

Delineate your health care wishes, such as:

  • Health care instructions, including life support, organ and tissue donation
  • Revoke prior directives

A sample form is attached for reference. Acknowledgment before a notary public is not required if two qualified witnesses have signed this Directive in Part 5. In other words this is a free legally binding document.

Upcoming Events

SCBE Brown Bag

Tuesday, March 5, 2019, 12pm
Doug White, MD, MAS
Chair of Ethics in Critical Care Medicine, and Professor of Critical Care Medicine, and Clinical Translational Science, University of Pittsburg Medical Center
Topic: TBA

More events

Medicine & the Muse Program (Click here to learn more) 

Friday, March 1, 2019, 7:30pm
A Conversation with Krista Tippett and Laurel Braitman || On Being Wise
Nourse Theater, San Francisco
Info and tickets available here.

Ways to Give Gifts

A gift may be made in the form of a check, securities, a bequest, or a complex trust arrangement designed to maximize tax advantages. Checks should be made payable to Stanford University.

For financial donations, please contact the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics at
650-723-5760.