In the News

June

Scope, 06/13/19

--Learning the risk of genetic disease through Humanwide

This post highlights the third video in the Humanwide series featuring Jayasree, a 39-year-old patient enrolled in the Stanford Medicine pilot project, who sought testing to determine whether she carried a gene that would heighten her risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Megan Mahoney, clinical professor of medicine and chief of general primary care, and Kelly Ormond, professor of genetics, are featured.

 

TIME.com, 06/13/19

--'They’re chipping away.' Inside the grassroots effort to fight mandatory vaccines

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this piece on the anti-vaccine movement.

 

Scope, 06/13/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Why healthy living matters

In the seventh post in the series Taking Depression Seriously, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao outline how healthy behaviors can lessen symptoms.

 

USA Today, 06/12/19

--Fentanyl overdose deaths: Why was this doctor allowed to study and practice medicine?

This op-ed, co-written by Alyssa Burgart argues that applicants with serious criminal histories should not be admitted to medical school. Burgart is clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain, member of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and medical director of clinical ethics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

 

Forum (KQED), 06/07/19

--Trump Administration Pulls Funding for Research Using Fetal Tissue

The Department of Health and Human Services announced last week that it will no longer fund any research involving human fetal tissue conducted by in-house scientists at the National Institutes of Health. This segment discussed the politics and ideology behind the move and what the change means for medical research. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, was interviewed.

 

Scope, 06/06/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Selecting a mental health care provider

In the sixth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao clarify the different types of care providers.

 

VICE News, HBO, 06/04/19

--Opioids In Court & War Crime Prisoner

Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson appeared in court for the first time to defend itself against an Oklahoma lawsuit that accuses it of fueling the opioid epidemic. Marking the first real test of whether Big Pharma can be held liable for the opioid crisis. Alyssa Burgart, MD, MA provides comment. The segment starts at minute 10:31.

 

New York Times, 06/06/19

--Putting the glam in mammogram

Clinics are trying to improve the mammogram experience to get women to show up for regular appointments. Laurence Baker, professor and chair of health research and policy, is quoted in this article.

 

Scope, 06/04/19

--Pharmacogenomics syncs medications with an individual’s genetics through Humanwide

Through the Humanwide project, a patient's pharmacogenomic evaluation helped doctors prescribe a pain reliever that is effective for her individual biology. This post highlights the second video in the Humanwide series which features Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science.

 

May

Scope, 05/30/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Types of talk therapy

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao outline the different types of talk therapy.

 

Scope, 05/23/19

--Cystic fibrosis took Mallory Smith’s life, but her memoir lives on

Mallory Smith's posthumous memoir, Salt in My Soul, An Unfinished Life, chronicles her life with cystic fibrosis. Christy Hartman, senior producer with the Stanford Storytelling Project, knew Mallory and attended a campus event celebrating Mallory's book. David Cornfield, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, was Mallory’s physician and is quoted here.

 

Scope, 05/23/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Understanding medications

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and graduate student Sophia Xiao clarify different types of medications for depression.

 

Forbes.com, 05/17/19

--Price transparency: Why are drug prices such a bitter pill to swallow?

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this piece on rising drug costs.

 

Scope, 05/16/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: A treatment overview

In the third post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao address the treatments available for depression.

 

Stanford Medicine News, 05/14/19

--Can Precision Health transform primary care? Look to Stanford’s Humanwide pilot

In this LinkedIn post, Dean Lloyd Minor explores the promise of Precision Health through Humanwide, a Stanford Medicine pilot program using a data-driven, integrated team approach to predict and prevent disease. A paper outlining initial learnings from the program is also highlighted in a Stanford Medicine press release that quotes Minor; authors Megan Mahoney, clinical professor of medicine and chief of general primary care, and Steven Asch, professor of medicine and vice chief of primary care and population health; and David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care.

 

Sacramento Bee, 05/13/19

--Vaccine opponents tap social media to fight new California exemptions bill

Senate Bill 276 would require public health officials to approve exceptions to vaccination requirements. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the  Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

 

Scope, 05/08/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Breaking down barriers to care

In this second post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao, examine barriers to accessing mental health care.

 

Next Avenue, 05/08/19

--Resources for your next doctor appointment

VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training, shares her advice on getting the best care possible.

 

Scope, 05/02/19

--Taking depression seriously: What is it?

This piece is the first in a series called Taking Depression Seriously, which aims to help patients and family members better understand depression as a chronic disease and more successfully navigate the health care system. Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao, provide insight on depression in this post.

 

Read More in SCBE News

Advanced Health Care Directive

California law give you the ability to ensure that your health care wishes are known and considered if you become unable to make these decisions yourself. Completing a form called an “Advance Health Care Directive” allows you to do a number of things:

Appoint another person to be your health care “agent”

Delineate your health care wishes, such as:

  • Health care instructions, including life support, organ and tissue donation
  • Revoke prior directives

A sample form is attached for reference. Acknowledgment before a notary public is not required if two qualified witnesses have signed this Directive in Part 5. In other words this is a free legally binding document.

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