Press Releases

  • How Epstein-Barr virus triggers multiple sclerosis

    A new study found that part of the Epstein-Barr virus mimics a protein made in the brain and spinal cord, leading the immune system to mistakenly attack the body’s nerve cells.

  • Antibodies may predict COVID-19 severity

    A look at antibodies in patients soon after they were infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 showed key differences between those whose cases remained mild and those who later developed severe symptoms.

  • Therapeutics accelerator launched

    Deerfield Management, a health care investment firm, has committed up to $130 million to support innovative translational research at Stanford.

  • Antibody synergy targets tough cancers

    Two anti-cancer antibodies have a much stronger effect against pediatric nerve-cell and bone cancers in mice than either one alone, researchers have discovered.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • Hematologist Steven Coutre dies

    Steven Coutre was known for his research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his humility and his love of traveling and family.

  • 500th heart transplant at Stanford

    Mackenzie Collins was the 500th pediatric patient to undergo a heart transplant at Stanford Medicine.

  • Surgery rates rebounded quickly in pandemic

    After a dramatic drop in nonessential surgery rates early in the pandemic, U.S. hospitals quickly adapted to new safety protocols, and rates returned to normal, Stanford Medicine research shows.

  • Diversity key to cholesterol risk prediction

    A Stanford study shows that using genomes from a diverse pool of people improves the ability to predict an individual’s risk of having high cholesterol.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.


2023 ISSUE 3

Exploring ways AI is applied to health care