Press Releases

  • Immunologist Samuel Strober dies at 81

    Strober, a professor and former chief of immunology and rheumatology, found a way for transplant recipients to reduce or abandon immunosuppressive drugs yet avoid organ rejection.

  • Test can predict severe dengue

    Researchers have created a test that can predict which dengue patients will likely have mild symptoms and which should be clinically monitored for a high risk of severe illness.

  • Diabetes drug linked to birth defects

    In men, the use of metformin may affect sperm development in a way that increases birth defects in their sons, a study found.

  • Gene-therapy gel shows promise for skin disease

    Stanford researchers have been working on gene therapies for epidermolysis bullosa, or “butterfly disease,” for over a decade. A new gel helped wounds heal and stay healed in a clinical trial.

  • Possible treatment for mucus-induced lung diseases

    Stanford Medicine investigators and their collaborators have designed a compound that’s uniquely capable of blocking excessive mucus secretion — a hallmark of several serious respiratory disorders.

  • Gene behind ALS hallmark discovered

    Stanford Medicine researchers have linked a specific gene known to be associated with ALS with a characteristic of the disease, opening avenues for a targeted therapy.

  • Emergency outcomes for veterans

    Veterans taken by ambulance to VA hospitals have significantly higher survival rates than veterans transported to non-VA hospitals, researchers find.

  • Autism is different in girls’ brains

    Girls with autism differ in several brain centers compared with boys with the disorder, suggesting gender-specific diagnostics are needed, a Stanford study using artificial intelligence found.

  • William Northway dies at 89

    The Stanford pediatric radiologist, after noticing a new and disturbing pattern among lung X-rays of premature infants, forever altered treatment for the smallest babies.

  • Vaccination protects better than infection

    COVID-19 vaccines are better than infection at making antibodies to recognize new viral variants, according to a Stanford study.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers