Press Releases

  • Virtual biopsy shows promise

    Stanford Medicine researchers develop a new imaging method to create a cell-by-cell reconstruction of skin or other tissue without taking a biopsy.

  • Alistair Philip dies at 86

    Alistair Philip, professor emeritus of pediatrics, pioneered a test to reduce antibiotic use in newborns, streamlined nursery care at several hospitals and devoted his life to educating others in his field.

  • Bill Marshall dies at 92

    The Stanford Medicine professor was well known as a mentor and teacher, as well as for his expertise in neuroradiology.

  • Drug lowers food allergy risk

    A drug that binds to allergy-causing antibodies can protect children from dangerous reactions to accidentally eating allergy-triggering foods, a Stanford Medicine-led study found.

  • Why women have higher autoimmunity risk

    Research throws light on the mystery of why women are much more prone to autoimmune disorders: A molecule made by one X chromosome in every female cell can generate antibodies to a woman’s own tissues.

  • Psychiatrist Craig Barr Taylor dies at 78

    Taylor, a Stanford Medicine professor emeritus, took a public health approach to mental health and was an early proponent of digital interventions for anxiety and eating disorders.

  • Drug treats vets’ PTSD and depression

    Stanford Medicine researchers find that ibogaine, a plant-based psychoactive compound, safely led to improvements in depression, anxiety and functioning among veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

  • Brain stimulation can improve hypnotizability

    Stanford Medicine scientists used transcranial magnetic stimulation to temporarily enhance hypnotizability in patients with chronic pain, making them better candidates for hypnotherapy.

  • Smartwatches diagnose kids’ arrhythmias

    Apple watches have some advantages over traditional ways of diagnosing cardiac arrhythmias in children but need more validation, finds a Stanford Medicine study.

  • Tumor DNA levels in blood predict outcome

    Circulating tumor DNA predicts recurrence and splits disease into two subgroups in Stanford Medicine-led study of Hodgkin lymphoma. New drug targets or changes in treatments may reduce toxicity.


2024 ISSUE 1

Psychiatry’s new frontiers