Morgridge Faculty Scholars

Cristina Alvira, MD
Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2015-2020)
Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care Medicine)

Education:
BS, Tufts University, 1995
MD, Tufts University School of Medicine, 1999
Residency, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2002
Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2005

Research focus:
Dr. Alvira’s current research focuses on the identification of novel pathways that promote lung growth after birth, since both local and systemic infections can injure the lung. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that unique pathways may exist that serve to protect the immature lung from severe inflammation, and potentially allow for a greater regeneration after injury. Dr. Alvira’s goal is to exploit these developmental pathways to preserve and promote lung growth during pediatric illness, and potentially, to induce regenerative lung growth after injury in adults.


Catherine Blish, MD, PhD
Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2015-2020)
Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine) and Stanford Immunology
 
Education:
BS, University of California, Davis, 1993
PhD, University of Washington, 1999
MD, University of Washington, 2001
Residency, University of Washington, 2003
Fellowship, University of Washington, 2007
 
Research focus:
Dr. Blish uses a systems immunology approach to develop new methods to prevent and control infectious diseases, with a major focus on defining immune mechanism that contribute to viral susceptibility in pregnant women. Her studies are highly translational in nature, bringing comprehensive immune profiling techniques such as mass cytometry to clinical and epidemiologic studies of pregnancy, HIV, and influenza. Dr. Blish continues to practice medicine and attends regularly on the Infectious Diseases consult service at Stanford. Assistant Director of the Stanford Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), Dr. Blish has received numerous awards for research and mentoring.


David Camarillo, PhD
Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2015-2020)
Associate Professor of Bioengineering and (by courtesy) of Mechanical Engineering
 
Education:
BSE, Princeton University, 2001
PhD, Stanford University, 2008
Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, University of California, San Francisco, 2011

Research focus:
Dr. Camarillo is an expert in instrumentation and biomechanics whose research interests include medical technology design over a broad range of applications, from mild traumatic brain injury to in-vitro fertilization diagnostics and sensor-guided surgical robots. As Principal Investigator of the Camarillo Lab, a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded laboratory at Stanford, Dr. Camarillo’s research is dedicated to advancing patient care and biological research through a future generation of intelligent biomedical devices.


Elizabeth Egan, MD, PhD 
Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2017-2022)
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

Education:
BA, Barnard College, Columbia University, Biological Sciences
MD, Tufts University School of Medicine, Medicine
PhD, Tufts University Sackler School of Biomedical Sciences, Genetics

Research focus:
Dr. Egan's research is focused on understanding how host factors from the human erythrocyte influence the biology and pathogenesis of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.


Anupama Narla, MD
Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2017-2022)
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology & Oncology)

Education:
BA, Human Biology and Biomedical Ethics, Brown University (1999)
MD, University of Pennsylvania (2003)
Pediatric Internship and Residency, University of California San Francisco (2003-2006)
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship, Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute (2006-2009)

Research focus:
More than 15 years ago, researchers discovered that a rare congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, Diamond Blackfan anemia, is caused by mutations in a ribosomal protein RPS19. Subsequently, my mentor, Benjamin Ebert, MD, identified RPS14 as the gene responsible for the profound macrocytic anemia in the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. This reinforced the connection between ribosomal abnormalities and defects in erythropoiesis. Moreover, mutations in other genes required for normal ribosome biogenesis have been implicated in other rare congenital syndromes including Schwachman-Diamond syndrome, X-linked dyskeratosis congenita, Cartilage Hair Hypoplasia and Treacher Collins syndrome.

Despite these important discoveries, there has been little progress in therapeutic options for patients. Therefore, our lab is studying the molecular mechanisms by which ribosomal dysfunction leads to bone marrow failure by further characterizing the signaling pathways that are triggered and the subsequent effects on hematopoiesis. We are also focused on understanding the effects of specific drugs on these disorders, which may uncover further clues about pathophysiology and as importantly, will directly benefit patients.

The goal of the Narla lab is to ask specific translational questions in pediatric hematology that will contribute both to patient management as well as scientific discovery in these rare diseases.

Mentor:
Matthew Porteus, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics – Stem Cell Transplantation

 


Manish Saggar, MD, PhD
Tashia and John Morgridge Endowed Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2020-2025)
Assistant Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

Study Title: A Computational Neuropsychiatry Approach Towards Characterizing Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development

Education:
MS, University of Texas at Austin, Computer Science (2009)
B.Tech, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Information Technology (2005)
 

Research focus:
I am a computational neuroscientist and currently focus on understanding brain dynamics at rest as well as during learning. The overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I strongly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. Funded by a career development award (K99/R00; NIMH) and a young investigator award (NARSAD; Brain & Behavior Foundation), I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls. The application of computational modeling to neuroscience and psychiatry is nascent in its development but holds significant promise to positively affect public health. I have a strong interdisciplinary background in (1) computational sciences, (2) neuroscience as well as (3) psychiatry. Integrating neuroscience, psychiatry, and mathematical modeling represents the new frontier in applications and analysis of large neuroimaging datasets and has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of dynamical brain organization in healthy controls and in individuals with psychiatric disorders.


Peter Santa Maria, MD, PhD
Tashia and John Morgridge Endowed Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2020-2025)
Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology (Otology & Neurotology)

Study Title: Sensory Hearing Loss in Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media

Education:
MD, University of Western Australia (2002) WA Australia
MBBS, The University of Western Australia, Medicine / Surgery (2001)
PhD, The University of Western Australia (2012)

Research focus:
Dr. Santa Maria specializes in adult and pediatric surgery for hearing, balance and facial nerve disorders. He has a special interest in the management of cholesteatoma, chronic otitis media, ear drum perforations and hearing reconstruction, otosclerosis and stapes surgery, eustachian tube surgery, tumors of the ear and skull base including acoustic neuroma, schwannoma, meningioma, glomus tumors, cholesterol granuloma and squamous cell cancer of the ear as well as hearing implants, including cochlear implants, bone anchored hearing aids. Dr. Santa Maria has authored book chapters and published papers and continues his clinical research in these areas, particularly with a focus on hearing preservation in cochlear implant surgery and outcomes of vestibular schwannoma management. 

Dr. Santa Maria completed his PhD in the molecular biology of wound healing of the tympanic membrane at The University of Western Australia (2012). His research includes a novel treatment for chronic ear drum perforations was accelerated through the SPARK program at Stanford, winning the "Excellence in Stanford SPARK 2014" award, and then taken into a pharmaceutical start-up, Auration Biotech, aimed at bringing treatments for hearing loss into the clinic. Auration Biotech partnered with a large pharmaceutical company, Astellas, to bring the non-surgical treatment for ear drum repair into human clinical trials in 2020. He research has now expanded to include novel treatments for biofilms in chronic suppurative otitis media and growth factor therapy for oral wound healing. He now is Associate Director of Stanford SPARK, assisting academic discoveries through translation to the clinic.


Suzanne Tharin, MD
Tashia and John Morgridge Endowed Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2020-2025)
Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

Study Title: Microrna Control of Connectivity in the Developing Central Nervous System

Education:
MD, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York (2004)
PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory/SUNY Stony Brook, Genetics (2000)
MSc, University of Toronto, Anatomy and Cell Biology (1994)
BSc, University of Toronto, Physiology (1991)


Research focus:
Dr. Suzanne Tharin's research program encompasses the molecular controls over cortical neuronal development, spinal cord injury, and regenerative strategies for spinal cord repair, including stem cell-based strategies. As a practicing neurosurgeon at the Palo Alto VA and Stanford University Hospital, Dr. Tharin is dedicated to translating an understanding of neural development into regenerative strategies for the treatment of spinal cord injury.


Past Holders

  • Manuel R. Amieva, MD, PhD 
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2009-2014)
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology
  • Manish J. Butte, MD, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2013-2016)
    Previosuly an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology) at Stanford University; Currently, an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles 
  • Samuel H. Cheshier, MD, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2012-2017)
    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology
  • Claudia Mueller, MD, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2008-2013)
    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) 
  • Julien Sage, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2008-2014)
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cancer Biology) and of Genetics
  • Alejandro Sweet-Cordero, MD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2009-2015)
    Associate Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Hematology & Oncology)
  • Alexander Urban, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2016-2019)
    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Genetics
  • Shreyas Vasanawala, MD, PhD 
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2009-2017)
    Associate Professor, Radiology – Pediatric Radiology
  • Marius Wernig, MD, PhD
    Tashia and John Morgridge Faculty Scholar in Pediatric Translational Medicine (2013-2018) 
    Assistant Professor of Pathology