list : Immunology

  • How Epstein-Barr virus triggers multiple sclerosis

    A new study found that part of the Epstein-Barr virus mimics a protein made in the brain and spinal cord, leading the immune system to mistakenly attack the body’s nerve cells.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.

  • Study: COVID-19 vaccine effective in cancer patients

    The Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech vaccines prevented COVID-19 infection in cancer patients, particularly in those whose treatment concluded more than six months before vaccination, say researchers at Stanford, Harvard and the VA.

  • Common genetic profile linked to drug reaction

    New medications help many people with inflammatory conditions and may ease severe COVID-19, but they carry risks.

  • New immunotherapy targets tumors

    Stanford researchers have developed a synthetic, tumor-targeting molecule that promotes immune activation and tumor regression in laboratory mice after it’s injected into their bloodstreams.

  • COVID-19 nasal spray vaccine

    A potential COVID-19 vaccine, delivered via a squirt up the nose, shows promise in mice.

  • J&J produces low antibody response

    In large study of dialysis patients, low immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson indicates that a booster shot might be needed.

  • Allergies to COVID-19 vaccines mostly mild

    In a study of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine doses given at Stanford Medicine, vaccine allergies were rare, mild and mostly triggered by a vaccine additive, not the mRNA.

  • Severe COVID-19, autoantibodies linked

    A study spearheaded by Stanford researchers indicates that at least 1 in 5 hospitalized COVID-19 patients develops new antibodies that attack their own tissue within a week of admission.

  • COVID-19 symptoms and prior common colds

    In COVID-19 patients whose symptoms were mild, Stanford researchers found that they were more likely than sicker patients to have signs of prior infection by similar, less virulent coronaviruses.