list : Immunology

  • How COVID-19 virus infects nasal cells

    A discovery by Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues may pave the way for a “morning after” or prophylactic nasal spray to prevent infection.

  • Blood test identifies infections

    A diagnostic test developed by Stanford Medicine scientists can separate bacterial and viral infections with 90% accuracy, the first to meet standards set by the World Health Organization.

  • Mice with diabetes regain blood sugar control

    A technique developed at Stanford Medicine allows mice with diabetes to accept unmatched islet cells and durably restores blood sugar control without immunosuppression or graft-versus-host disease.

  • Predicting immunity from vaccination

    A gene signature seen in antibody-producing cells in the blood of vaccinated study participants could expedite vaccine development.

  • Viral genome packing key in replication

    Disrupting a virus’s genome packaging can halt replication and jumpstart a natural immune response against subsequent exposures, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Magazine explores molecules within us

    The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine features articles about the molecules that make us who we are and how understanding them can lead to medical discoveries and innovations.

  • Mark Davis on immunology research

    Vaccinology has taken great leaps forward in the past decade, largely due to advanced analytical methods as well as a shift in researchers’ focus from rodents to humans.

  • Hints into long COVID

    People with lower levels of an antiviral antibody as well as those with lung disease take longer to clear COVID-19 symptoms, say Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.