list : Immunology

  • Gummy phlegm and COVID-19

    Levels of a stringy, spongy substance soar in the sputum of COVID-19 patients requiring intubation, accounting for at least some of their breathing trouble. Development of an off-patent drug may prevent it.

  • Stanford Medicine provides monkeypox test

    Stanford Medicine now provides a test for the monkeypox virus. Rapid identification of infected people will help combat the virus’s spread and facilitate patient care.

  • Immunosuppression-free kidney transplant

    Using a method they developed for stem cell transplants, a Stanford team has enabled children with immune disorders to receive a new immune system and a matching kidney from a parent.

  • Jeffrey Glenn receives $69 million grant

    Stanford Medicine’s SyneRx will develop drugs to fight viral pathogens with high pandemic potential, including the one that causes COVID-19.

  • 1,000+genes linked to severe COVID-19

    Using machine learning, researchers from Stanford Medicine and their collaborators found specific genetic signals in people who develop severe coronavirus infection.

  • Bacteria that digest breast milk in decline

    Stanford Medicine researchers and colleagues found that as nations industrialize, a species of bacteria critical in the early development of infant gut microbiomes fades away.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • ‘Remote-controlled’ CAR-T cell therapy safer

    Stanford researchers modified anti-cancer CAR-T cells so they can be controlled with an oral drug. The modified cells are safer, more potent and more active against solid tumors in mice.

  • Monack named Microbiology and Immunology chair

    Monack, whose research focuses on interactions between microbial pathogens and the immune system during infections, succeeds David Schneider.

  • COVID RNA lingers in feces

    People with mild to moderate COVID-19 can shed viral RNA in their feces months after initial infection, Stanford researchers find. Those who do often have nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.