News & Research

  • What to know about monkeypox

    The monkeypox virus is normally endemic to Africa but has recently been found on other continents. It spreads through prolonged, direct contact with infected people or their bedding, clothing and towels.

  • Fish study rebuts anti-evolution argument

    A key developmental gene governs the number and length of spines in the stickleback, Stanford Medicine researchers find. The discovery supports the concept of progressive evolution in nature.

  • Step toward growing organs

    Researchers have shown initial viability of an embryo that contains both chimpanzee and macaque cells in a preliminary study that explores the feasibility of primate organ genesis.

  • Blood sugar control helps teens’ brains

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • White coats mark beginning of study

    Stanford Medicine MD and PA students from diverse backgrounds commemorate their past and future at this year’s white coat ceremonies.

  • Expert committee on reproductive health

    A new Stanford Medicine committee is addressing medical, equity, safety, legal and other concerns arising from the Supreme Court ruling on abortion.

  • Viral genome packing key in replication

    Disrupting a virus’s genome packaging can halt replication and jumpstart a natural immune response against subsequent exposures, a Stanford Medicine study finds.

  • Lowering health care billing costs

    Stanford researchers and colleagues find ways to lower health care administration costs within the U.S. multipayer system by analyzing other countries’ approaches.

  • Epilepsy linked to mood symptoms in pregnancy

    Stanford-led study gives new insight into how epilepsy, pregnancy and symptoms of mood disorders interact.

  • Cancer tolerated by immune system

    Cancer cells in the lymph nodes trick the immune system into tolerating their presence and welcoming metastasis, a pair of Stanford studies find. Blocking this process could stop cancer’s spread.

  • Chief diversity and inclusion officer

    Joyce Sackey, advocate and leader of inclusive excellence, will join Stanford Medicine as its inaugural chief diversity and inclusion officer.

  • New pediatric emergency department opens

    The Stanford Medicine Pediatric Emergency Department opened Aug. 10. The child-centered space puts kids at ease while medical professionals deliver advanced care.


2022 ISSUE 1

Understanding the world within us

Stanford Medicine's blog about health, medicine, science & innovators


Other Stanford
Medicine News

  • – Global Health

    Michele Barry on Preventing Pandemics

    “Epidemics are inevitable, but pandemics are preventable,” said Michele Barry, MD, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health. She sees this moment of global awareness and interest in pandemics as an opportunity to catalyze innovation and build better prepared, more equitable health systems.

  • – Department of
    Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Stanford's successful heart transplantation using COVID-19 positive donor

    A team of heart surgeons and health care specialists from the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery performed their first reported heart transplant using a COVID-19-positive donor.


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