list : Neuroscience

  • Autism hinders grasp of vocal emotion

    Children with autism have trouble identifying emotional tones because of differences in a brain region that processes social information, a Stanford Medicine study found.

  • Brain cell transplantation aids research

    Lab-grown clusters of human brain cells integrate so well into young rats’ brains they enable researchers to study neurodevelopmental disorders’ molecular and circuit underpinnings.

  • $10 million for autism, sleep research

    About 80% of children with autism have trouble sleeping, but whether better sleep could lessen other autism symptoms is unknown. A new grant will help Stanford Medicine scientists find out.

  • Mignot wins life sciences Breakthrough Prize

    The Stanford Medicine sleep researcher is honored for discovering the role of orexins in narcolepsy and paving the way to new sleep disorder therapies.

  • Deisseroth to receive Horwitz Prize

    The Stanford psychiatrist, neuroscientist and engineer is honored for developing a technology that lets researchers pinpoint the functions — and malfunctions — of specific brain circuits.

  • Blood sugar control helps teens’ brains

    Diabetes treatment technology improved teenagers’ blood sugar levels and benefited their brain structure and function, according to a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

  • COVID-19 brain fog similar to chemo brain

    Researchers found that damage to the brain’s white matter after COVID-19 resembles that seen after cancer chemotherapy, raising hope for treatments to help both conditions.

  • Rare mutation protects against Alzheimer's

    Researchers have discovered that a rare mutation inherited with the APOE4 gene variant protects against Alzheimer's, shedding new light on ways to counteract high-risk genes for the disease.

  • Refining law on the definition of death

    Experts propose revising the legal and medical standard on declaring someone dead based on respiratory function and likelihood of consciousness rather than cessation of brain function.

  • Brain plasticity leads to worse seizures

    A brain mechanism needed for learning explains why epileptic seizures become more frequent, but a finding in rodents offers hope for treatment, according to a new study.