list : Neuroscience

  • Endocannabinoids and epilepsy

    Release of the brain’s equivalent of THC, marijuana’s active component, reduces seizure activity but leads to post-seizure oxygen deprivation in the brain, Stanford scientists and their collaborators have shown.

  • Schulman on value of new Alzheimer’s drug

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new and expensive medication for Alzheimer’s disease, but it’s not clear it helps. Researcher Kevin Schulman discusses what the government should consider before deciding to cover it.

  • Evidence COVID-19 causes brain inflammation

    A detailed molecular analysis of tissue from the brains of individuals who died of COVID-19 reveals extensive signs of inflammation and neurodegeneration, but no sign of the virus that causes the disease.

  • Software ‘reads’ imagined handwriting

    Artificial intelligence, interpreting data from a device placed at the brain’s surface, enables people who are paralyzed or have severely impaired limb movement to communicate by text.

  • Face, brain development share many genes

    Researchers at Stanford and KU Leuven have identified more than 70 genes that affect variation in both brain and facial structure. The genes don’t influence cognitive ability, further debunking beliefs that intelligence can be assessed by facial features.

  • Brain implants steady artist’s hand

    Thanks to deep brain stimulation, an artist stricken with a common but lesser known neurological disorder called essential tremor can paint again with a steady hand.

  • Study reveals immune driver of brain aging

    Scientists have identified a key factor in mental aging and shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system’s front-line soldiers.

  • Brain-to-muscle circuit in a dish

    A Stanford Medicine team used human stem cells to assemble a working nerve circuit connecting brain tissue to muscle tissue. The research could enable scientists to better understand neurological disorders that affect movement.

  • High-risk, high-reward grants for researchers

    Annelise Barron, Peter Kim, Siddhartha Jaiswal and Keren Haroush will receive grants totaling $10 million to fund their investigations. The awards support risky efforts that could potentially have a big impact in the biomedical sciences.

  • Neuronal abnormalities in schizophrenia

    A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why.