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  • How Epstein-Barr virus triggers multiple sclerosis

    A new study found that part of the Epstein-Barr virus mimics a protein made in the brain and spinal cord, leading the immune system to mistakenly attack the body’s nerve cells.

  • Sex differences in genes of mice brains

    Stanford scientists found more than 1,000 gene-activation differences between female and male mice’s brains, plus more than 600 between females in different stages of their reproductive cycle.

  • New possible ALS genes discovered

    Using machine learning, Stanford Medicine scientists and their colleagues have found hundreds of genes that could play a role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Antibodies may predict COVID-19 severity

    A look at antibodies in patients soon after they were infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 showed key differences between those whose cases remained mild and those who later developed severe symptoms.

  • Therapeutics accelerator launched

    Deerfield Management, a health care investment firm, has committed up to $130 million to support innovative translational research at Stanford.

  • Antibody synergy targets tough cancers

    Two anti-cancer antibodies have a much stronger effect against pediatric nerve-cell and bone cancers in mice than either one alone, researchers have discovered.

  • Fastest genome sequencing

    A research effort led by Stanford scientists set the first Guinness World Record for the fastest DNA sequencing technique, which was used to sequence a human genome in just 5 hours and 2 minutes.

  • Hormone treatment for transgender teens

    Transgender adults who started gender-affirming hormone therapy as teens had better mental health than those who waited until adulthood or wanted the treatment but never received it, a Stanford-led study found.

  • New Stanford Health Care board chair

    Silicon Valley entrepreneur Marc E. Jones has been a board member since 2020. He succeeds John Levin as chair.

  • Stanford ranks high for complex heart procedures

    For patients like Nathan Foss, Stanford’s expertise in rare and complicated heart surgeries provides better options.


2021 ISSUE 2

Unlocking the secrets of the brain

COVID-19 Updates

Stanford Medicine is closely monitoring the outbreak of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A dedicated page provides the latest information and developments related to the pandemic.