In the News

  • Fri Dec 04 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – STAT

    How climate change could chip away at sleep health

    Some experts predict that heat-related disruptions to sleep will likely get worse in the years to come as nighttime temperatures rise. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discusses how climate change can affect the way people sleep.

  • Tue Dec 01 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Stanford News

    SLAC, Stanford scientists recognized for breakthroughs at Falling Walls competition

    Seven SLAC and Stanford nominees were finalists in the 2020 Falling Walls Breakthroughs of the Year competition. The annual event brings together researchers, scientists, engineers, innovators and thinkers from around the globe to discuss science, politics, business and media. Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, was a top 10 category finalist on the topic of “Human Neuropsychiatric Disorders.”

  • Wed Oct 21 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Good Morning America

    Why this high school teacher lets his students sleep in class

    This story discusses a Minnesota teacher who allows students to sleep during class, as part of a unique sleep study lesson. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment here.

  • Mon Oct 12 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Spectrum | Autism Research News

    Brain organoids reveal neuronal flaws in syndrome tied to autism

    Neurons derived from people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome show deficits in calcium signaling and electrical activity, pointing to possible therapeutic targets. New findings uncover factors that may contribute to the development of psychiatric conditions associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. They could also help researchers identify new therapeutic targets - Sergiu Pasca, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Mon Sep 28 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – News Center

    Stanford scientists solve secret of nerve cells marking a form of schizophrenia

    A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why. Sergiu Pasca, the Bonnie Uytengsu and Family Director of the Stanford Brain Organogenesis Program and an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is senior author.

  • Wed Sep 23 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – The LowDOWN

    Sweet Dreams: Down Syndrome and Sleep

    On Season 2, Episode 3 of The LowDOWN: A Down Syndrome Podcast, Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, gives us the lowdown on sleep issues for people with Down syndrome.

  • Tue Sep 22 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – The Future of Everything Podcast

    How to get a good night’s sleep

    COVID-19 is changing how many scientists, like Stanford sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, view their field. Listen in as Dr. Pelayo talks sleep on this episode of Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything podcast.

  • Sat Sep 19 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Healthline

    Why Poor Sleep Can Lead to Weight Gain

    This piece highlights a recent study that found not getting enough sleep or having inconsistent sleeping patterns is associated with a higher body mass index. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Fri Sep 11 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Good Housekeeping

    Using Two Separate Duvets Could Save Your Relationship, According to Sleep Doctors

    Before you get a sleep divorce and stop sharing a bed altogether, think about the role your bedding plays in your sleeplessness. Rafael Pelayo, sleep specialist and clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment on sleep preferences in this article.

  • Fri Aug 07 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – The Stanford Daily

    Quarantine negatively impacts sleep health of Stanford students

    With COVID-19 cases on the rise across the country, students are experiencing worse sleep health, which is taking a physical and mental toll on students. In this Stanford Daily article, Rachel Manber, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Scott Kutscher, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, discuss the impacts and encourage students to explore resources that may help.

  • Fri Jul 31 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Science

    William C. Dement (1928–2020)

    In the Science article, Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, write about William C. Dement, one of the founders of sleep science and medicine. Dr. Dement devoted his life to helping the public appreciate the importance of sleep health. His pioneering work, which included the discovery of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, touched countless lives.

  • Wed Jul 22 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – US News & World Report

    AHA News: Enjoy a Nap, But Know the Pros and Cons

    This article discusses the pros and cons of napping, the possible health links, and sleep patterns. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted.

  • Fri Jul 17 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Thrive Global

    6 Things You Need to Know If Your Mind Can't Stop Racing When You Go to Bed

    Exactly what to do when you’re overpowered by nighttime thoughts. Fiona Barwick, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Fri Jun 26 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Mic

    Why do some people talk in their sleep?

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article about sleep talking.

  • Fri Jun 19 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Scope

    Remembering William Dement: Squirt guns, a golf cart and an unforgettable spirit - Scope

    Known as the “father of sleep medicine,” long-time Stanford Medicine faculty member William Dement is remembered for his charm, quirkiness and generosity. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine; and Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and medical director of the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, are quoted in this article along with colleagues.

  • Thu May 21 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Fortune

    Can snoring be cured? It’s surprisingly difficult

    This article discusses snoring and offers tips to manage it. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

  • Fri Apr 17 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – NYT Parenting

    How to Make Night Terrors Less Terrifying

    Night terrors, nightmares that cause screaming and thrashing in the night, are most common in toddlers and preschoolers, and can last up to age 12. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides input on the causes these episodes and how parent can handle them.

  • Wed Mar 11 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Allure

    I've Barely Dreamt In the Past 15 Years, and I Finally Found Out Why

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article on why some people don’t dream.

  • Mon Mar 09 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Allure

    Sleep Debt Exists, But Can You Ever Catch Up?

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment in Allure's recent piece that focuses on what you need to know about sleep deprivation and its effects.

  • Fri Feb 21 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Pulmonology Advisor

    The Bidirectional Nature of Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea - Pulmonology Advisor

    The article looks at the relationship between asthma and obstructive sleep apnea. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and medical director of the Stanford Sleep Medicine Center, is interviewed for the story.

  • Thu Feb 06 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – HuffPost

    What It Means If You're Grinding Your Teeth (And How To Stop It)

    About eight percent of adults and a third of children grind their teeth, especially while sleeping. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why some lifestyle habits may be to blame.

  • Mon Feb 03 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Woman's Day

    Try These 24 Tricks to Get Your Best Sleep Ever

    Sleep experts provide simple tips and tricks to improve sleep quality at night. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article.

  • Thu Jan 30 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Scientific American

    “Mini Brains” Are Not like the Real Thing

    Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article on brain organoids.

  • Fri Jan 24 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – Scientific American

    Organoids: Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops

    Studying gene expression in human brain tissue grown in the lab could offer insight into disorders such as autism. Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted about the early stages of human brain development.

  • Thu Jan 16 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2020 – NY Times

    A (Former) Night Owl’s Guide to Becoming a Morning Person

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is quoted in this article on how to switch from staying up late to becoming a morning person.

  • Mon Dec 02 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – Stanford Medicine Magazine

    Sleep and Genes

    As sleep research at Stanford turns 50, a new generation of scientists are using biomedical techniques to unravel its mysteries. The work of William Dement, the Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, emeritus; Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences; Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine; Rebecca Bernert, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and founding director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory at Stanford, are featured in this piece

  • Mon Nov 25 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – Medium

    It’s Not the Turkey That Makes You Tired

    Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why people feel tired after eating a hearty Thanksgiving dinner.

  • Tue Nov 19 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – NPR.org

    Seeing Monsters? It Could Be The Nightmare Of Sleep Paralysis : Short Wave

    This podcast explored the signs and symptoms of sleep paralysis and ways to treat it. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Chief of the Division of Sleep Medicine, was featured.

  • Tue Nov 19 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – NY Times

    Will Science Ever Give Us a Better Night’s Sleep? (Published 2019)

    This piece focuses on how scientists are working to unravel the mysteries of sleep. Clete Kushida, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and Chief of the Division of Sleep Medicine, provides comment here.

  • Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – HuffPost

    What To Do If Your Partner Has Totally Different Sleep Habits

    Couples with competing sleeping habits can be problematic. This pieces offers guidance on how to cope with it and quotes Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.

  • Sun Oct 20 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – NBC News

    The cast of Seinfeld lulls me off to sleep. Is it as good for me as it feels?

    This article looks at whether falling asleep to the TV is a healthy bedtime ritual. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the sleep habit.

  • Thu Oct 17 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – POPSUGAR Fitness

    According to a Doctor, Here's When You Should Work Out For a Full Night of Restorative Sleep

    A poor night of sleep can have an adverse effect on your workout. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, explains why the timing of exercise can make a big difference in quality of sleep.

  • Tue Oct 15 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – KQED

    Legislation Moves Forward Earliest Start Times in California Schools | KQED

    California becomes the first state to mandate later school start times. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed live about what the newly passed bill means for sleep-deprived students.

  • Fri Oct 11 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – Yahoo

    Is sleeping too much putting your health at risk?

    A new study in The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association found a link between sleeping for long periods of time (along with chronic insomnia symptoms) and declines in memory, executive function and processing speed. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, comments on the findings.

  • Wed Sep 11 00:00:00 GMT-07:00 2019 – Why do we sleep talk? Here’s everything you should know

    Why do we sleep talk? Here’s everything you should know

    Nearly 66% of the population has talked in their sleep in some form, according to a 2010 study. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted in this article.

Christian Guilleminault, researcher who coined ‘obstructive sleep apnea syndrome,’ dies at 80

Christian Guilleminault, a prolific researcher who helped build Stanford’s sleep disorders clinic into an influential, full-service sleep center, died July 9 of cancer.

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Neural sleep patterns emerged at least 450 million years ago

Researchers have found that brain patterns in sleeping zebrafish are similar to those of land vertebrates, suggesting that such sleep signatures developed before aquatic and land animals diverged. A paper describing the research was published July 10 in Nature. Philippe Mourrain, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is the senior author.

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Sleep science takes the stage at Big Data in Precision Health

"The field of sleep medicine is very large," said Emmanuel Mignot, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. "And the talks we've heard exemplify that: We can approach sleep medicine at home with an app, or we can create more devices to monitor sleep, but I think the first question we should ask is, 'Why should we study sleep?'"

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New research links brain injury from low oxygen to specific cells

Using a lab model, Stanford researchers have identified a type of developing brain cell that is affected by exposure to low oxygen levels. The work was led by Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Anca Pasca, assistant professor of pediatrics.

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School's In: Losing Sleep

Rafael Pelayo talks about why teenagers become night owls, the risks of sleep deprivation and the controversy over later school start times.

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Linking narcolepsy to the flu? Researchers make progress identifying molecular mimicry

In very rare cases, a flu infection or flu vaccine can trigger an immune reaction leading to narcolepsy. Stanford researchers led by Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, have figured out why. Mignot is quoted in this article.

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A third of Americans are sleep-deprived. This technology could help them rest easier

Artificial intelligence could help improve sleep studies, some researchers believe. Emmanuel Mignot, the Craig Reynolds Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, provides comment in this story.

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Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia

This piece discusses the use of cognitive behavioral therapy — a type of therapy that aims to modify harmful behaviors, emotions and thoughts — to treat insomnia. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences with the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine, is quoted.

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Many not sleeping enough – or well enough – and that's a killer

This piece discusses the dangers of sleep deprivation. Seiji Nishino, emeritus professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, provides comment.

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AASM publishes clinical practice guideline on use of actigraphy for sleep disorders

The AASM just published a clinical practice guideline on the use of actigraphy for sleep disorders.  Joseph Cheung, instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences in the division of sleep medicine, has been a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine's task force on actigraphy for the past two years.

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Why do we sleep? A bedtime story

This is a bedtime story for America—a journey through time that brings us back to the first sleep studies on REM sleep, uncovering how things got so bad, and what we can do to change our habits—and our lives. Rafael Pelayo, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and William Dement, Lowell W. and Josephine Q. Berry Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus, are interviewed in this piece.

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Poor sleep linked to less exercise in people with arthritis

New research finds a strong relationship between a lack of physical activity and poor sleep quality in people with arthritis. Rafael Pelayo, who was not involved with the research, is quoted here.

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Using medicine and science to improve the quality of life

This piece highlights medical and scientific discoveries that are being used to help people and save lives. The work of Sergiu Pasca, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who uses lab-grown brain organoids for research on psychiatric and neurological issues, is referenced here. 

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Using a CPAP machine can improve sex lives for some, study says

New research suggests that regular use of a continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, machine could improve the sex lives of people with obstructive sleep apnea, especially in women. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the research, provides comment here.

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Sleep Medicine at Stanford's 14th Annual Wellness Fair

Kimberly Truong, Sita Sawyer, and Fiona Barwick from the Division of Sleep Medicine were on site March 22nd for Stanford's 14th Annual Wellness Fair.  The theme this year was “Creating a Wonderful World” and the team answered sleep questions, offered sleep challenges, and provided CPAP demonstrations. A good time was had by all!

Night owls have 10% higher mortality risk, study says

New research suggests that people who are evening types – or “night owls” – have a 10 percent increased risk of all-cause mortality compared with morning types of people. Jamie Zeitzer, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, who was not involved with the research, provides comment in this piece.  

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The Japanese Art of Lounging

The article takes a look at the Japanese tradition of dozing off or lazing about in bed, somewhere between wakefulness and rest. Dr. Rafael Pelayo, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is interviewed for the article.

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AASM members give drowsy driving presentation at annual Lifesavers Conference

Three of AASM’s Occupational Sleep Wellness Presidential Committee’s members attended the annual Lifesavers Conference on highway safety priorities in April 2018 to disseminate education in drowsy driving.  Shannon Sullivan, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is featured.