Bio

Bio


Maya Adam MD is the Director of Health Education Outreach at Stanford's Center for Health Education and the Faculty Lead for the Digital Medical Education International Collaborative in South Africa. Adam has been teaching at Stanford University since 2009. She received her BA in Human Biology from Stanford before studying medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Prior to her post-secondary studies, she spent 10 years as a professional ballet dancer with the State Theater of Saxony in Germany. At the Stanford Center for Health Education, Adam creates online educational content for use in under-served populations, including those in low- and middle-income countries. Adam leads five massive open online health education courses, serving more than 450,000 international learners. In South Africa, her team collaborates with UNICEF and the National Department of Health to create digital educational content for community health workers and mothers as part of the Road to Health initiative. Adam is the author of Food Love Family: A Practical Guide to Child Nutrition.

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Director, Health Education Outreach, Stanford Center for Health Education (2018 - Present)
  • Faculty Lead, Digital MEdIC South Africa (2017 - Present)
  • Founder, Just Cook for Kids (2013 - Present)

Community and International Work


  • Digital Medical Education International Collaborative, South Africa

    Topic

    Maternal Child Health Education

    Partnering Organization(s)

    National Dept. of Health, South Africa, and UNICEF

    Populations Served

    Low- and middle-income mothers in South Africa

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Stanford Health Outreach App, South Africa

    Topic

    Community Health Promotion

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Philani Maternal and Child Health Clinic

    Populations Served

    Women and children in under-resourced areas

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

All Publications


  • Community health workers' experiences of using video teaching tools during home visitsA pilot study HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY Coetzee, B., Kohrman, H., Tomlinson, M., Mbewu, N., Le Roux, I., Adam, M. 2018; 26 (2): 167–75

    Abstract

    Innovations in health, such as the use of tablet computers, show promise in broadening the scope of work of community health workers (CHWs), and play an important role in keeping CHWs and their clients up to date with advancements in health. While the use of mobile phones and tablets is innovative, the applicability of these technologies in different contexts remains poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the acceptability and feasibility of the use of video teaching tools on such devices across diverse contexts. In this study, we aimed to explore the acceptability and feasibility of using tablets with teaching videos (about HIV, alcohol, nutrition and breastfeeding) to support the health promotion efforts of 24 CHWs who work with pregnant mothers and mothers of young children in an urban township in South Africa. Between November 2015 and May 2016, we conducted focus groups and identified four key themes (with several sub-themes) that demonstrated factors related to the acceptability and feasibility of these devices and their content. Focus group transcripts were analysed thematically using qualitative data analysis software. The findings indicated that while the devices contained several supportive features (such as lightening the workload, and stimulating interest in their work), they also contained several restrictive features (safety and confidentiality). CHWs considered the video content an important tool to engage not only their clients but also family members and the community at large. Issues surrounding safety, privacy and confidentiality of using these devices require careful consideration prior to implementation in large-scale studies. Furthermore, stigma associated with household visits by CHWs and the nature of their work also need to be addressed by researchers and programme implementers. Overall, CHWs deemed the devices and the video content an acceptable and feasible means with which to provide health promotion and education among their clients.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/hsc.12488

    View details for Web of Science ID 000424198100014

    View details for PubMedID 28872210

  • The Use of Short, Animated, Patient-Centered Springboard Videos to Underscore the Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Medical Student Education. Academic medicine Adam, M., Chen, S. F., Amieva, M., Deitz, J., Jang, H., Porwal, A., Prober, C. 2017

    Abstract

    Medical students often struggle to appreciate the clinical relevance of material taught in the preclinical years. The authors believe videos could be effectively used to interweave a patient's illness script with foundational basic science concepts.In collaboration with four other U.S. medical schools, educators at the Stanford University School of Medicine created 36 short, animated, patient-centered springboard videos (third-person, narrated accounts of authentic patient cases conveying foundational pathophysiology) in 2014. The videos were used to introduce students to 36 content modules, created as part of a microbiology, immunology, and infectious diseases curriculum. The videos were created with input from faculty content experts and in some cases medical students, and were piloted using a flipped classroom pedagogical approach in January 2015-June 2016.Student feedback from course evaluations and focus groups was analyzed using a mixed-methods approach. On the course evaluations, the majority of students rated the patient-centered videos positively, and the majority of comments on the videos were positive, highlighting both enhanced engagement and enhanced learning and retention. Comments from focus groups mirrored the course evaluation comments and highlighted different usage patterns for the videos.The authors will continue to gather and analyze data from schools using the videos as part of their core preclinical curriculum, and will produce similar videos for use in other areas of undergraduate medical education. These videos could support students' review of content taught previously and be repurposed for use in continuing and graduate medical education, as well as patient education.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001574

    View details for PubMedID 28121656

  • Massive open online nutrition and cooking course for improved eating behaviors and meal composition. international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity Adam, M., Young-Wolff, K. C., Konar, E., Winkleby, M. 2015; 12 (1): 143-?

    View details for DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0305-2

    View details for PubMedID 26630879