Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Orthopaedic Surgery

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Sinai Hospital Of Baltimore (2011) MD
  • Residency:Northwestern McGaw (2009) IL
  • Fellowship:Royal Children's Hospital (2010) Australia
  • Internship:Northwestern McGaw (2005) IL
  • Medical Education:University of Pennsylvania (2004) PA
  • Fellowship, International Center for Limb Lengthening, Rubin Institute of Advanced Orthoapedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Limb Lengthening & Recon (2011)
  • Fellowship, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Paediatric Orthopaedics (2010)
  • Residency, Northwestern McGaw, Orthopaedics (2009)
  • MD, University of Pennsylvania, Medicine (2004)
  • BS, Northwestern University, Biomechanical Engineering (1999)

Community and International Work


  • Pediatric Orthopaedics, Port Au Prince, Haiti

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Operation Rainbow, Team Sinai

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Pediatric Orthopaedics, Esteli, Nicaragua

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Operation Rainbow

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Pediatric Orthopaedics, Buga, Columbia

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Casa De Columbia

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Volunteer, Guatemala City, Guatemala

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Cross Cultural Solutions, Pediatric Foundation of Guatemala

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Management of the knee in spastic diplegia: what is the dose? Orthopedic clinics of North America Young, J. L., Rodda, J., Selber, P., Rutz, E., Graham, H. K. 2010; 41 (4): 561-577

    Abstract

    This article discusses the sagittal gait patterns in children with spastic diplegia, with an emphasis on the knee, as well as the concept of the "dose" of surgery that is required to correct different gait pathologies. The authors list the various interventions in the order of their increasing dose. The concept of dose is useful in the consideration of the management of knee dysfunction.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ocl.2010.06.006

    View details for PubMedID 20868885

  • Sacral stress fractures in children. American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) Mangla, J., Young, J. L., Thomas, T. O., Karaikovic, E. E. 2009; 38 (5): 232-236

    View details for PubMedID 19584993

  • Infected Total Ankle Arthroplasty Following Routine Dental Procedure FOOT & ANKLE INTERNATIONAL Young, J. L., May, M. M., Haddad, S. L. 2009; 30 (3): 252-257

    View details for DOI 10.3113/FAI.2009.0252

    View details for Web of Science ID 000263867000010

    View details for PubMedID 19321103

  • Remodeling of birth fractures of the humeral diaphysis JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDICS Husain, S. N., King, E. C., Young, J. L., Sarwark, J. F. 2008; 28 (1): 10-13

    Abstract

    Birth fractures of the humeral diaphysis are encountered at most pediatric medical centers and pediatric orthopaedic practices. The treatment strategy of these fractures is uniformly nonoperative. However, we have not found sufficient studies in the literature demonstrating the extent to which remodeling is possible and therefore how much deformity is acceptable in the treatment of these fractures.We reviewed the records of our institution's Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic and identified all children seen for birth fractures of the humerus from 2001 to 2005. The angulation and displacement at presentation and at follow-up were measured.All patients were treated nonoperatively, and most were managed by swaddling. In 9 patients with more than 4 months of radiographic follow-up, the mean initial angulation was 26 degrees in the coronal plane and 25 degrees in the sagittal plane. The mean angulation at final follow-up was 5 degrees in the coronal plane and 7 degrees in the sagittal plane. The maximum angulation at presentation was 66 degrees, which remodeled to 5 degrees at 7.3 months' follow-up.Our findings suggest that attempts to obtain an anatomical reduction or the use of more than the simplest immobilization methods are not necessary given the tremendous capacity for remodeling of these fractures in infants.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000255766600003

    View details for PubMedID 18157039

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