Bio

Clinical Focus


  • General Surgery
  • Cardiovascular Surgery

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Residency:St Vincent's Hospital and New York Medical College (2001) NY
  • Medical Education:St George's University School of Medicine (2000) West Indies
  • Fellowship:Loma Linda University Medical Center (2008) CA
  • Board Certification, American Board of Thoracic Surgery, Thoracic Surgery (2010)
  • Board Certification: General Surgery, American Board of Surgery (2006)
  • Residency:University of North Dakota (2005) ND

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Fetal cardiac intervention: Improved results of fetal cardiac bypass in immature fetuses using the TinyPump device. journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Sebastian, V. A., Ferro, G., Kagawa, H., Nasirov, T., Maeda, K., Ferrier, W. T., Takatani, S., Riemer, R. K., Hanley, F. L., Reddy, V. M. 2013; 145 (6): 1460-1464

    Abstract

    Fetal cardiac surgery is a potential innovative treatment for certain congenital heart defects that have significant mortality and morbidity in utero or after birth, but it has been limited by placental dysfunction after fetal cardiac bypass. We have used the TinyPump device for fetal cardiac bypass in sheep fetuses at 90 to 110 days gestation.Ten mixed-breed pregnant ewes were used over a period of 6 months, and 10 fetuses were placed on bypass for 30 minutes. Five fetuses with a mean gestational age of 104 ± 4.5 days and mean weight of 1.4 ± 0.4 kg were placed on bypass using the TinyPump device, and 5 fetuses with a mean gestational age of 119 ± 4.5 days and mean weight of 3.4 ± 0.4 kg were placed on bypass using the roller head pump. The fetuses were monitored for up to 3 hours after bypass or until earlier demise.Progressive respiratory and metabolic acidosis developed in all fetuses. The TinyPump group had a lower gestational age and weight compared with the roller head pump group. However, the rate of postbypass deterioration in the TinyPump group, as measured with blood gases, was noted to be significantly slower compared with the roller head pump group.We demonstrate the feasibility of the TinyPump device for fetal cardiac bypass in a fetal sheep model. The TinyPump group showed improved results compared with the roller head group despite more immature fetuses. The TinyPump device seems to be a promising device for future studies of fetal cardiac bypass in immature fetal sheep and in primates.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2012.08.014

    View details for PubMedID 22944083

  • Anomalous Aortic Origin of a Coronary Artery: Medium-Term Results After Surgical Repair in 50 Patients ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY Mainwaring, R. D., Reddy, V. M., Reinhartz, O., Petrossian, E., Macdonald, M., Nasirov, T., Miyake, C. Y., Hanley, F. L. 2011; 92 (2): 691-697

    Abstract

    Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery (AAOCA) is a rare congenital heart defect that has been associated with myocardial ischemia and sudden death. Controversies exist regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term recommendations for patients with AAOCA. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the medium-term results of surgical repair for AAOCA.From January 1999 through August 2010, 50 patients underwent surgical repair of AAOCA. The median age at surgery was 14 years (range, 5 days to 47 years). Thirty-one patients had the right coronary originate from the left sinus of Valsalva, 17 had the left coronary originate from the right sinus, and 2 had an eccentric single coronary ostium. Twenty six of the 50 patients had symptoms of myocardial ischemia preoperatively, and 14 patients had associated congenital heart defects. Repair was accomplished by unroofing in 35, reimplantation in 6, and pulmonary artery translocation in 9.There was no operative mortality. The median time of follow-up has been 5.7 years. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and 1 patient required heart transplantation 1 year after AAOCA repair. In the remaining 47 postoperative patients, all have remained free of cardiac symptoms and no one has experienced a sudden death event.The surgical treatment of AAOCA is safe and appears to be highly effective in eliminating ischemic symptoms. These medium-term results are encouraging and suggest that many patients may be able to resume normal activities.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2011.03.127

    View details for Web of Science ID 000293221000050

    View details for PubMedID 21718962

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