Bio

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • B.S., Seoul National University, Physics (2002)
  • Ph.D., Cornell University, Applied Physics (2008)

Patents


  • Seung-min Park. "United StatesMICROFLUIDIC ENCAPSULATED NEMS RESONATORS"
  • Seung-min Park. "United StatesDEVICE FOR RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF NUCLEIC ACIDS FOR BINDING TO SPECIFIC CHEMICAL TARGETS"
  • Seung-min Park. "United StatesNANOFILTER DEVICES USING ELASTOMERIC MICRO TO NANOCHANNEL INTERFACES AND METHODS BASED THEREON"

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Development of Integrated Nanotechnologies for Early Cancer Detection

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Pref-1 Marks Very Early Mesenchymal Precursors Required for Adipose Tissue Development and Expansion CELL REPORTS Hudak, C. S., Gulyaeva, O., Wang, Y., Park, S., Lee, L., Kang, C., Sul, H. S. 2014; 8 (3): 678-687

    Abstract

    Pref-1 is an EGF-repeat-containing protein that inhibits adipocyte differentiation. To better understand the origin and development of white adipose tissue (WAT), we generated transgenic mouse models for transient or permanent fluorescent labeling of cells using the Pref-1 promoter, facilitating inducible ablation. We show that Pref-1-marked cells retain proliferative capacity and are very early adipose precursors, prior to expression of Zfp423 or PPARγ. In addition, the Pref-1-marked cells establish that adipose precursors are mesenchymal, but not endothelial or pericytal, in origin. During embryogenesis, Pref-1-marked cells first appear in the dorsal mesenteric region as early as embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). These cells become lipid-laden adipocytes at E17.5 in the subcutaneous region, whereas visceral WAT develops after birth. Finally, ablation of Pref-1-marked cells prevents not only embryonic WAT development but also later adult adipose expansion upon high-fat feeding, demonstrating the requirement of Pref-1 cells for adipogenesis.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.06.060

    View details for Web of Science ID 000341572200005

    View details for PubMedID 25088414

  • Toward Integrated Molecular Diagnostic System (iMDx): Principles and Applications IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Park, S., Sabour, A. F., Son, J. H., Lee, S. H., Lee, L. P. 2014; 61 (5): 1506-1521

    Abstract

    Integrated molecular diagnostic systems ( iMDx), which are automated, sensitive, specific, user-friendly, robust, rapid, easy-to-use, and portable, can revolutionize future medicine. This review will first focus on the components of sample extraction, preservation, and filtration necessary for all point-of-care devices to include for practical use. Subsequently, we will look for low-powered and precise methods for both sample amplification and signal transduction, going in-depth to the details behind their principles. The final field of total device integration and its application to the clinical field will also be addressed to discuss the practicality for future patient care. We envision that microfluidic systems hold the potential to breakthrough the number of problems brought into the field of medical diagnosis today.

    View details for DOI 10.1109/TBME.2014.2309119

    View details for Web of Science ID 000335150300015

    View details for PubMedID 24759281

  • Discriminating cellular heterogeneity using microwell-based RNA cytometry NATURE COMMUNICATIONS Dimov, I. K., Lu, R., Lee, E. P., Seita, J., Sahoo, D., Park, S., Weissman, I. L., Lee, L. P. 2014; 5

    View details for DOI 10.1038/ncomms4451

    View details for Web of Science ID 000334300400034

  • Hemolysis-free blood plasma separation LAB ON A CHIP Son, J. H., Lee, S. H., Hong, S., Park, S., Lee, J., Dickey, A. M., Lee, L. P. 2014; 14 (13): 2287-2292

    Abstract

    Hemolysis, involving the rupture of red blood cells (RBCs) and release of their contents into blood plasma, is a major issue of concern in clinical fields. Hemolysis in vitro can occur as a result of errors in clinical trials; in vivo, hemolysis can be caused by a variety of medical conditions. Blood plasma separation is often the first step in blood-based clinical diagnostic procedures. However, inhibitors released from RBCs due to hemolysis during plasma separation can lead to problems in diagnostic tests such as low sensitivity, selectivity and inaccurate results. In particular, a general lack of simple and reliable blood plasma separation methods has been a major obstacle for microfluidic-based point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices. Here we present a hemolysis-free microfluidic blood plasma separation platform. A membrane filter was positioned on top of a vertical up-flow channel (filter-in-top configuration) to reduce clogging of RBCs by gravity-assisted cells sedimentation. With this device, separated plasma volume was increased approximately 4-fold (2.4 μL plasma after 20 min with 38% hematocrit human whole blood), and hemoglobin concentration in separated plasma was decreased approximately 90% due to the prevention of RBCs hemolysis, when compared to conventional filter-in-bottom configuration blood plasma separation platforms. On-chip plasma contained ~90% of protein and ~100% of nucleic acids found in off-chip centrifuged plasma, confirming comparable target molecule recovery efficiency. This simple and robust on-chip blood plasma separation device integrates with downstream detection modules to ultimately create sample-to-answer microfluidic POC diagnostics devices.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/c4lc00149d

    View details for Web of Science ID 000337096800017

    View details for PubMedID 24825250

  • Rapid Prototyping of Nanofluidic Systems Using Size-Reduced Electrospun Nanofibers for Biomolecular Analysis SMALL Park, S., Huh, Y. S., Szeto, K., Joe, D. J., Kameoka, J., Coates, G. W., Edel, J. B., Erickson, D., Craighead, H. G. 2010; 6 (21): 2420-2426

    Abstract

    Biomolecular transport in nanofluidic confinement offers various means to investigate the behavior of biomolecules in their native aqueous environments, and to develop tools for diverse single-molecule manipulations. Recently, a number of simple nanofluidic fabrication techniques has been demonstrated that utilize electrospun nanofibers as a backbone structure. These techniques are limited by the arbitrary dimension of the resulting nanochannels due to the random nature of electrospinning. Here, a new method for fabricating nanofluidic systems from size-reduced electrospun nanofibers is reported and demonstrated. As it is demonstrated, this method uses the scanned electrospinning technique for generation of oriented sacrificial nanofibers and exposes these nanofibers to harsh, but isotropic etching/heating environments to reduce their cross-sectional dimension. The creation of various nanofluidic systems as small as 20 nm is demonstrated, and practical examples of single biomolecular handling, such as DNA elongation in nanochannels and fluorescence correlation spectroscopic analysis of biomolecules passing through nanochannels, are provided.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/smll.201000884

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284016700012

    View details for PubMedID 20878634

  • A method for nanofluidic device prototyping using elastomeric collapse PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Park, S., Huh, Y. S., Craighead, H. G., Erickson, D. 2009; 106 (37): 15549-15554

    Abstract

    Nanofluidics represents a promising solution to problems in fields ranging from biomolecular analysis to optical property tuning. Recently a number of simple nanofluidic fabrication techniques have been introduced that exploit the deformability of elastomeric materials like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These techniques are limited by the complexity of the devices that can be fabricated, which can only create straight or irregular channels normal to the direction of an applied strain. Here, we report a technique for nanofluidic fabrication based on the controlled collapse of microchannel structures. As is demonstrated, this method converts the easy to control vertical dimension of a PDMS mold to the lateral dimension of a nanochannel. We demonstrate here the creation of complex nanochannel structures as small as 60 nm and provide simple design rules for determining the conditions under which nanochannel formation will occur. The applicability of the technique to biomolecular analysis is demonstrated by showing DNA elongation in a nanochannel and a technique for optofluidic surface enhanced Raman detection of nucleic acids.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.0904004106

    View details for Web of Science ID 000269806600009

    View details for PubMedID 19717418

  • Selection and elution of aptamers using nanoporous sol-gel arrays with integrated microheaters LAB ON A CHIP Park, S., Ahn, J., Jo, M., Lee, D., Lis, J. T., Craighead, H. G., Kim, S. 2009; 9 (9): 1206-1212

    Abstract

    RNA and DNA aptamers that bind to target molecules with high specificity and affinity have been a focus of diagnostics and therapeutic research. These aptamers are obtained by SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) often requiring more than 10 successive cycles of selection and amplification, where each cycle normally takes 2 days per cycle of SELEX. Here, we have demonstrated the use of sol-gel arrays of proteins in a microfluidic system for efficient selection of RNA aptamers against multiple target molecules. The microfluidic chip incorporates five sol-gel binding droplets, within which specific target proteins are imbedded. The droplets are patterned on top of individually addressable electrical microheaters used for selective elution of aptamers bound to target proteins in the sol-gel droplets. We demonstrate that specific aptamers bind their respective protein targets and can be selectively eluted by micro-heating. Finally, our microfluidic SELEX system greatly improved selection efficiency, reducing the number of selection cycles needed to produce high affinity aptamers. The process is readily scalable to larger arrays of sol-gel-embedded proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a chip-based selection of aptamers using microfluidics, thereby allowing development of a high throughput and efficient SELEX procedures.

    View details for DOI 10.1039/b814993c

    View details for Web of Science ID 000265223200008

    View details for PubMedID 19370238

  • On-chip coupling of electrochemical pumps and an SU-8 tip for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry BIOMEDICAL MICRODEVICES Park, S., Lee, K. H., Craighead, H. G. 2008; 10 (6): 891-897

    Abstract

    We present the integration of a cyclo olefin copolymer microfluidic chip with electrochemical pumps and an SU-8 tip for electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The electrochemical pump, using electrolysis as an internal pressure source, was fabricated directly on the surface of the polymer chip. The triangular SU-8 emitter tip was fabricated on a glass wafer using standard photolithography. After release from the glass wafer, this tip was aligned to the microchannel and bonded between two polymer plates. The electrochemical pump and the electrospray tip were tested with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry confirmed the stability of the electrochemical pump and the electrospray tip.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10544-008-9203-6

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259246400013

    View details for PubMedID 18563570

  • Microfluidic encapsulated nanoelectromechanical resonators JOURNAL OF VACUUM SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY B Aubin, K. L., Huang, J., Park, S., Yang, Y., Kondratovich, M., Craighead, H. G., Ilic, B. R. 2007; 25 (4): 1171-1174

    View details for DOI 10.1116/1.2746333

    View details for Web of Science ID 000249170100013

Books and Book Chapters


  • Optical Methods in Studies of Olfactory System Bioelectronic Nose Lee, S., Park, S., Lee, L. P. Springer. 2014: 191-220

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