Bio

Bio


Kristin M. Nord, M.D., is a Clinical Professor of Dermatology and has served as Residency Program Director since 2012. Dr. Nord received her doctor of medicine from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and completed her residency in Dermatology at New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Nord is Attending Physician at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System, where her clinical interests are general dermatology, complex medical dermatology and procedural dermatology, and she serves as Assistant Chief of Dermatologic Surgery. Her research focus is on skin cancer education and prevention, and she is co-faculty lead for SUNSPORT (Stanford University Sun Protection Outreach Research and Teamwork).

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University (2010 - 2012)
  • Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University (2012 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, American Medical Women’s Association (1999 - 2003)
  • Member, American Medical Student Association (1999 - 2003)
  • Member, Women’s Dermatologic Society (2005 - Present)
  • Chapter President, American Medical Student Association (2000 - 2001)
  • Member, Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery (2006 - Present)
  • Member, Skin Cancer Foundation (2006 - Present)
  • Chief resident representative, GME Committee, Columbia University (2006 - 2007)
  • Member, American Academy of Dermatology (2007 - Present)
  • Member, Dermatology Foundation (2007 - Present)
  • Member, National Association of VA Dermatologists (2007 - Present)
  • Member, National VA Dermatology Committee for Digital Photography Initiative (2008 - Present)
  • Member, Same Site Surgery Committee, VA Healthcare system, VISN 21 (2011 - 2011)
  • Member, Surgical Operative and Invasive Procedures Committee, Palo Alto Healthcare System (2011 - Present)
  • Member, San Francisco Dermatological Society (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Association of Professors of Dermatology (2013 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Chief Resident, Department of Dermatology, Columbia University/New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (2007)

Community and International Work


  • Faculty member, SUNSPORT (Stanford U Network for Sun Protection Outreach Research & Teamwork)

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Faculty sponsor, Stanford School of Medicine, Dermatology Interest Group

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Dermatologist Medical Volunteer, Stanford University Skin Cancer Screening

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Dermatologist Medical Volunteer, Women’s Dermatologic Society Skin Cancer Screening

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Medical Volunteer, FUNRURAL program, Guatemala City, Guatemala

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Surgical Operative and Invasive Procedures Committee, Palo Alto Healthcare System

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Same Site Surgery Committee, VA Healthcare system, VISN 21

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • National VA Dermatology Committee for Digital Photography Initiative

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Teaching

2017-18 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Promoting sunscreen use and sun-protective practices in NCAA athletes: Impact of SUNSPORT educational intervention for student-athletes, athletic trainers, and coaches JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY Ally, M. S., Swetter, S. M., Hirotsu, K. E., Gordon, J., Kim, D., Wysong, A., Donnelly, L., Li, S., Nord, K. M. 2018; 78 (2): 289-+

    Abstract

    Student-athletes (SAs) have an increased skin cancer risk on account of significant ultraviolet exposure; however, their sun-protective practices are suboptimal. A novel program, Stanford University Network for Sun Protection, Outreach, Research, and Teamwork (SUNSPORT), was designed to target SAs, coaches, and athletic trainers (ATs).To measure the impact of educational intervention on sun protection beliefs and practices of SAs.A survey of sun protection beliefs and practices was administered to National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes before and after intervention. SUNSPORT dermatologists educated SAs, coaches, and ATs regarding skin cancer risk and prevention methods. The main outcome was frequency of sunscreen use by SAs before versus after intervention.A total of 846 National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes were surveyed between September 23, 2012, and September 20, 2015. After intervention, significant increases were observed in sunscreen use 4 or more days per week by SAs (from 26% to 39% [P = .02]), SAs spoken to by their coach about sun safety (from 26% to 57% [P = .0001]), and SA recognition of higher skin cancer risk (from 54% to 67% [P = .04]).Intervention in only 1 West Coast university and no paired data.Following the SUNSPORT intervention, SAs were significantly more likely to use sunscreen, especially if encouraged by their coach. This study emphasizes that education directed to SAs, ATs, and coaches can improve sun-protective practices in SAs.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaad.2017.08.050

    View details for Web of Science ID 000422791000017

    View details for PubMedID 28993006

  • Standard dermoscopy and videodermoscopy as tools for medical student dermatologic education. Dermatology practical & conceptual Cho, H. G., Sheu, S. L., Chiang, A., Nord, K. M. 2018; 8 (1): 39–42

    View details for DOI 10.5826/dpc.0801a08

    View details for PubMedID 29445573

  • Videodermoscopy as a Novel Tool for Dermatologic Education CUTIS Sheu, S. L., Cho, H. G., Nord, K. M. 2017; 100 (2): E25–E27

    Abstract

    Dermoscopy is used as an adjunct to clinical examination in the diagnosis of skin lesions, including melanoma. Videodermoscopy, which allows for the concurrent examination of dermoscopic features at high magnification by instructors and trainees, may serve as a useful educational tool during bedside instruction. This article presents images of common cutaneous lesions taken with a standard optical dermatoscope and a videodermatoscope to highlight the potential educational advantages conferred by videodermoscopy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000416326800009

    View details for PubMedID 28961304

  • Mycophenolate mofetil-induced oral ulcerations in solid organ transplant recipients: A report of 3 cases. JAAD case reports Salik, J., Tang, R., Nord, K., Schneiderman, P. I., Grossman, M. E. 2015; 1 (5): 261-263

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jdcr.2015.06.005

    View details for PubMedID 27051747

  • Long-term Efficacy of Topical Fluorouracil Cream, 5%, for Treating Actinic Keratosis A Randomized Clinical Trial JAMA DERMATOLOGY Pomerantz, H., Hogan, D., Eilers, D., Swetter, S. M., Chen, S. C., Jacob, S. E., Warshaw, E. M., Stricklin, G., Dellavalle, R. P., Sidhu-Malik, N., Konnikov, N., Werth, V. P., Keri, J., Lew, R., Weinstock, M. A. 2015; 151 (9): 952-960

    Abstract

    Topical fluorouracil was demonstrated to be effective in reducing the number of actinic keratoses (AKs) for up to 6 months, but no randomized trials studied its long-term efficacy.To evaluate the long-term efficacy of a single course of fluorouracil cream, 5%, for AK treatment.The Veterans Affairs Keratinocyte Carcinoma Chemoprevention (VAKCC) trial was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with patients from dermatology clinics at 12 VA medical centers recruited from 2009 to 2011 and followed up until 2013. Our study population comprised 932 veterans with 2 or more keratinocyte carcinomas in the 5 years prior to enrollment. The mean follow-up duration was 2.6 years in both treatment and control groups.Participants applied either topical fluorouracil cream, 5% (n = 468), or vehicle control cream (n = 464) to the face and ears twice daily for up to 4 weeks.This study reports on AK counts and treatments, which were secondary outcomes of the VAKCC trial. Actinic keratoses on the face and ears were counted by study dermatologists at enrollment and at study visits every 6 months. The number of spot treatments for AKs on the face and ears at semiannual study visits and in between study visits was recorded.The number of AKs on the face and ears per participant was not different between the fluorouracil and control groups at randomization (11.1 vs 10.6, P > .10). After randomization, the fluorouracil group had fewer AKs compared with the control group at 6 months (3.0 vs 8.1, P < .001) and for the overall study duration (P < .001). The fluorouracil group also had higher complete AK clearance rates (38% vs 17% at 6 months) and fewer spot treatments at 6-month intervals, at study visits, and in between study visits during the trial (P < .01 for all). The fluorouracil group took longer to require the first spot AK treatment (6.2 months) compared with the control group (6.0 months) (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.60-0.79). The number of hypertrophic AKs was not different between the 2 groups overall (P = .60), although there were fewer hypertrophic AKs in the fluorouracil group at 6 months (0.23 vs 0.41) (P = .05).Our results indicate that a single course of fluorouracil cream, 5%, effectively reduces AK counts and the need for spot treatments for longer than 2 years.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:NCT00847912.

    View details for DOI 10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.0502

    View details for Web of Science ID 000361371100007

    View details for PubMedID 25950503

  • Chromhidrosis: a rare diagnosis requiring clinicopathologic correlation. American Journal of dermatopathology Wang, A., Wysong, A., Nord, K. M., Egbert, B. M., Kosek, J. 2014; 36 (10): 853-855

    Abstract

    : Chromhidrosis is a rare idiopathic disorder characterized by colored secretions most typically from the malar cheeks, axilla, or areolar regions. Histologically, chromhidrosis is notable for glandular structures with decapitation secretion indicating ectopic apocrine glands in the dermis, and the presence of lipofuscin pigments under ultraviolet fluorescence and in cytology smears. This case report describes a 26-year-old man who presented with a 2- to 3-year history of black-colored secretions on the bilateral malar cheeks, present on exertion or with squeezing of the cheeks. A 3-mm punch biopsy of the left cheek demonstrated histopathologic findings characteristic of chromhidrosis under hematoxylin and eosin staining and ultraviolet fluorescence. To our best knowledge, this is the second case report in the literature of an adult male being affected by chromhidrosis, and the first of an adult male with black-colored malar cheek secretions in chromhidrosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/DAD.0b013e3182871a17

    View details for PubMedID 23503318

  • Chromhidrosis: A Rare Diagnosis Requiring Clinicopathologic Correlation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DERMATOPATHOLOGY Wang, A., Wysong, A., Nord, K. M., Egbert, B. M., Kosek, J. 2014; 36 (10): 853-855

    Abstract

    : Chromhidrosis is a rare idiopathic disorder characterized by colored secretions most typically from the malar cheeks, axilla, or areolar regions. Histologically, chromhidrosis is notable for glandular structures with decapitation secretion indicating ectopic apocrine glands in the dermis, and the presence of lipofuscin pigments under ultraviolet fluorescence and in cytology smears. This case report describes a 26-year-old man who presented with a 2- to 3-year history of black-colored secretions on the bilateral malar cheeks, present on exertion or with squeezing of the cheeks. A 3-mm punch biopsy of the left cheek demonstrated histopathologic findings characteristic of chromhidrosis under hematoxylin and eosin staining and ultraviolet fluorescence. To our best knowledge, this is the second case report in the literature of an adult male being affected by chromhidrosis, and the first of an adult male with black-colored malar cheek secretions in chromhidrosis.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000344119600018

  • Pedunculated scrotal nodule in an elderly male: a rare presentation of trichoblastoma. Cutis Navi, D., Egbert, B., Nord, K. M. 2014; 94 (2): E8-9

    View details for PubMedID 25184656

  • Pyoderma Gangrenosum-like Lesions in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency I Treated with Intravenous Immunoglobulin PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY Nord, K. M., Pappert, A. S., Grossman, M. E. 2011; 28 (2): 156-161

    Abstract

    A 31-year-old Caucasian male with leukocyte adhesion deficiency I and a 20-year history of recurrent, painful cutaneous ulcerations on the extremities presented with fatigue and worsening pain in both legs. He had experienced minimal improvement in his leg ulcers from treatment with systemic steroids, numerous courses of systemic antibiotics, and brief trials of infliximab and mycophenolate mofetil. He was treated with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Upon completion of six courses of intravenous immunoglobulin his ulcerations had nearly healed for the first time in a decade.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1525-1470.2010.01123.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290381900013

    View details for PubMedID 21366684

  • Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY Rogers, H. D., MacGregor, J. L., Nord, K. M., Tyring, S., Rady, P., Engler, D. E., Grossman, M. E. 2009; 60 (2): 315-320

    Abstract

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaad.2008.08.035

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262617700019

    View details for PubMedID 19150275

  • Glomus tumor masquerading for 22 years as osteoarthritis of the hip CUTIS Weiser, J. A., Nord, K. M., Grossman, M. E. 2008; 81 (4): 339-342

    Abstract

    Glomus tumors are rare benign mesenchymal neoplasms that account for less than 2% of soft tissue tumors. These neoplasms typically are small nodules less than 1 cm in diameter, associated with pain that is exacerbated by tactile stimulation and cold hypersensitivity. We present a case of a large glomus tumor of the left lateral hip associated with a long history of severe pain of the left hip interfering with ambulation. Chronic pain as a result of a subcutaneous glomus tumor is rare and frequently misdiagnosed. In the case reported, a solid glomus tumor presented with 22 years of unilateral hip pain attributed to posttraumatic degenerative joint disease. Excision of a 4 x 3-cm nodule resulted in complete resolution of tenderness and joint pain. Subcutaneous glomus tumors can have unusually large size and location and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic, atypical, or treatment-resistant joint pain.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000255232700008

    View details for PubMedID 18491482

  • Soft papules and nodules on the buttock. Archives of dermatology Pol-Rodriguez, M. M., Nord, K. M., Engler, D. E. 2007; 143 (12): 1583-1588

    View details for PubMedID 18087013

  • Multiple cutaneous infantile hemangiomas associated with hepatic angiosarcoma: Case report and review of the literature (vol 118, pg e907, 2007) PEDIATRICS Nord, K. M., Kandel, J., Lefkowitch, J. H. 2007; 119 (6): 1271-1271
  • Perioral dermatitis in a patient with myasthenia gravis following systemic corticosteroid treatment BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY Goss, J. M., Nord, K. M., Olarte, M. R., Grossman, M. E. 2007; 156 (3): 582-582
  • Repair of a conchal bowl defect extending through the conchal cartilage DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY Magnuson, K. A., Ratner, D. 2002; 28 (12): 1165-1167

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179751300014

    View details for PubMedID 12472499