Clinical Focus

  • Neurology

Academic Appointments

Honors & Awards

  • Fellows Program, American Epilepsy Society (AES) (2015-2016)
  • Epilepsy Program, J. Kiffin Penry (2012)
  • Intramural Training Award Recipient (IRTA), National Institutes of Health (NIH) (2005-2006)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations

  • Member, American Epilepsy Society (2015 - Present)
  • Member, American Clinical Neurophysiological Society (2015 - Present)
  • Member, American Academy of Neurology (2011 - Present)

Professional Education

  • Fellowship:Rush University Medical Center (2016) IL
  • Board Certifications, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN), Neurology, Clinical Neurophysiology
  • Board Certification: Clinical Neurophysiology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2015)
  • Fellowship, Rush University Medical Center (Chicago, IL), Neurophysiology (2015), Epilepsy (2016)
  • Fellowship:Rush University Medical Center (2015) IL
  • Residency, Mount Sinai Medical Center/Icahn School of Medicine (New York, NY), Neurology (2014)
  • Residency:Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Neurology Residency (2014) NY
  • Internship, Georgetown University Hospital Center/Medstar (Washington, DC), Internal Medicine (2011)
  • Internship:Georgetown University Hospital (2011) DC
  • MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine (Washington, DC) (2010)
  • Medical Education:Georgetown University School of Medicine (2010) DC
  • Undergrad, Yale University (New Haven, CT), Cognitive Science (2005)


All Publications

  • Magnetoencephalography and New Imaging Modalities in Epilepsy NEUROTHERAPEUTICS Falco-Walter, J., Owen, C., Sharma, M., Reggi, C., Yu, M., Stoub, T. R., Stein, M. A. 2017; 14 (1): 4-10


    The success of epilepsy surgery is highly dependent on correctly identifying the entire epileptogenic region. Current state-of-the-art for localizing the extent of surgically amenable areas involves combining high resolution three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) source modeling of interictal epileptiform activity. Coupling these techniques with newer quantitative structural MRI techniques, such as cortical thickness measurements, however, may improve the extent to which the abnormal epileptogenic region can be visualized. In this review we assess the utility of EEG, MEG and quantitative structural MRI methods for the evaluation of patients with epilepsy and introduce a novel method for the co-localization of a structural MRI measurement to MEG and EEG source modeling. When combined, these techniques may better identify the extent of abnormal structural and functional areas in patients with medically intractable epilepsy.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s13311-016-0506-7

    View details for Web of Science ID 000392325200002

    View details for PubMedID 28054328

  • 'Tickling' seizures originating in the left frontoparietal region. Epilepsy & behavior case reports Falco-Walter, J. J., Stein, M., McNulty, M., Romantseva, L., Heydemann, P. 2016; 6: 49-51


    We report a 10-year-old boy with mild developmental delay and epilepsy with new events of right back tickling and emotional upset. These initially appeared behavioral, causing postulation of habit behaviors or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Several ictal and interictal EEGs were unrevealing. Continuous EEG revealed only poorly localized frontal ictal activity. Given that his clinical symptoms suggested a parietal localization, double-density EEG electrodes were placed to better localize the epileptogenic and symptomatogenic zones. These revealed evolution of left greater than right frontoparietal discharges consistent with seizures at the time of the attacks. Medical management has significantly reduced the patient's seizures.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ebcr.2016.07.002

    View details for PubMedID 27579251

  • Treatment of Established Status Epilepticus. Journal of clinical medicine Falco-Walter, J. J., Bleck, T. 2016; 5 (5)


    Status epilepticus is the most severe form of epilepsy, with a high mortality rate and high health care costs. Status epilepticus is divided into four stages: early, established, refractory, and super-refractory. While initial treatment with benzodiazepines has become standard of care for early status epilepticus, treatment after benzodiazepine failure (established status epilepticus (ESE)) is incompletely studied. Effective treatment of ESE is critical as morbidity and mortality increases dramatically the longer convulsive status epilepticus persists. Phenytoin/fosphenytoin, valproic acid, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, and lacosamide are the most frequently prescribed antiseizure medications for treatment of ESE. To date there are no class 1 data to support pharmacologic recommendations of one agent over another. We review each of these medications, their pharmacology, the scientific evidence in support and against each in the available literature, adverse effects and safety profiles, dosing recommendations, and limitations of the available evidence. We also discuss future directions including the established status epilepticus treatment trial (ESETT). Substantial further research is urgently needed to identify these patients (particularly those with non-convulsive status epilepticus), elucidate the most efficacious antiseizure treatment with head-to-head randomized prospective trials, and determine whether this differs for convulsive vs. non-convulsive ESE.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/jcm5050049

    View details for PubMedID 27120626