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  • Workplace racial/ethnic similarity, job satisfaction, and lumbar back health among warehouse workers: Asymmetric reactions across racial/ethnic groups JOURNAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Hoppe, A., Fujishiro, K., Heaney, C. A. 2014; 35 (2): 172-193

    View details for DOI 10.1002/job.1860

    View details for Web of Science ID 000331189800002

  • Biomechanical, psychosocial and individual risk factors predicting low back functional impairment among furniture distribution employees CLINICAL BIOMECHANICS Ferguson, S. A., Allread, W. G., Burr, D. L., Heaney, C., Marras, W. S. 2012; 27 (2): 117-123

    Abstract

    Biomechanical, psychosocial and individual risk factors for low back disorder have been studied extensively however few researchers have examined all three risk factors. The objective of this was to develop a low back disorder risk model in furniture distribution workers using biomechanical, psychosocial and individual risk factors.This was a prospective study with a six month follow-up time. There were 454 subjects at 9 furniture distribution facilities enrolled in the study. Biomechanical exposure was evaluated using the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (2001) lifting threshold limit values for low back injury risk. Psychosocial and individual risk factors were evaluated via questionnaires. Low back health functional status was measured using the lumbar motion monitor. Low back disorder cases were defined as a loss of low back functional performance of -0.14 or more.There were 92 cases of meaningful loss in low back functional performance and 185 non cases. A multivariate logistic regression model included baseline functional performance probability, facility, perceived workload, intermediated reach distance number of exertions above threshold limit values, job tenure manual material handling, and age combined to provide a model sensitivity of 68.5% and specificity of 71.9%.The results of this study indicate which biomechanical, individual and psychosocial risk factors are important as well as how much of each risk factor is too much resulting in increased risk of low back disorder among furniture distribution workers.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2011.09.002

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300810600003

    View details for PubMedID 21955915

  • Compliance With the North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) Work Practice Recommendations for Youth Working With Large Animals JOURNAL OF AGROMEDICINE Asti, L., Canan, B. D., Heaney, C., Ashida, S., Renick, K., Xiang, H., Stallones, L., Jepsen, S. D., Crawford, J. M., Wilkins, J. R. 2011; 16 (3): 174-193

    Abstract

    The North American Guidelines for Children's Agricultural Tasks (NAGCAT) were developed to reduce the risk of childhood agricultural injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate compliance with NAGCAT-recommended work practices (WPs) when youth work with large animals. On a daily basis, over a period of 10 weeks, youth self-reported the number of minutes they worked with a large animal and whether they followed the associated NAGCAT WP guidelines. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare boys to girls and to consider the effect of factors such as youth age, farm residence status, and selected parental characteristics. A high proportion of youth exhibited relatively low compliance for most of the five WPs evaluated. Respirators were rarely worn, but checking for people and obstacles in the area while working with large animals was commonly reported. In general, boys, especially the older boys, exhibited higher compliance than did girls. The results of our study demonstrate, in general, that youth are not following recommended NAGCAT WPs when working with large animals, identifying an area in agricultural safety and health requiring focused attention.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/1059924X.2011.584044

    View details for Web of Science ID 000300238300003

    View details for PubMedID 21728869

  • Stressors, Resources, and Well-Being Among Latino and White Warehouse Workers in the United States AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE Hoppe, A., Heaney, C. A., Fujishiro, K. 2010; 53 (3): 252-263

    Abstract

    Social forces and cultural factors may contribute to Latino and White workers experiencing similar jobs differently. This study examines the psychosocial stressors and resources experienced by Latino and White workers in manual material handling jobs in the US and the effects of these stressors and resources on worker well-being.Fifty-nine Latino warehouse workers were matched with White workers by job title, job tenure, and warehouse facility. Matched sample t tests and linear regression analyses models were conducted.Results reveal similar psychosocial stressors and resources for both groups. However, Latino workers reported better well-being. For Latino workers, social resources at work such as management fairness and supervisor support have a stronger relationship with well-being. For White workers wage fairness is the most significant predictor for well-being.These differential results challenge us to consider how cultural factors, expectations and the prior work history of Latino workers may influence their experience of work and the effect of work on health.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ajim.20752

    View details for Web of Science ID 000275084500004

    View details for PubMedID 19774551

  • Social Support and Companionship Among Active African American Women AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH BEHAVIOR Harley, A. E., Katz, M. L., Heaney, C. A., Duncan, D. T., Buckworth, J., Odoms-Young, A., Willis, S. K. 2009; 33 (6): 673-685

    Abstract

    To examine the role of physical activity (PA) companions in supporting PA participation among African American women.Data were collected through in-depth interviews and focus groups. Fifteen physically active African American women participated in the study. Grounded theory data analysis techniques were used to develop a taxonomy depicting roles of PA companions for African American women.PA companions functioned in 4 different roles: motivational, social, facilitative, and instructional. Supportive behaviors associated with each role were also elucidated.These findings provide an understanding for the function of companions in sustaining active lifestyle that can be used to inform intervention development.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000271597500005

    View details for PubMedID 19320616

  • Justice at Work, Job Stress, and Employee Health HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR Fujishiro, K., Heaney, C. A. 2009; 36 (3): 487-504

    Abstract

    A small but growing literature has documented an association between justice at work and employee health. However, the pathways and mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. This article proposes a conceptual framework that bridges the organizational justice, occupational stress, and occupational epidemiology literatures. Justice appraisals are proposed to be both important mediators and moderators in the causal flow from exposure to the organizational environment to employee health. The potential role of justice in enhancing employee health is compared to that of the well-established concepts of social support and job control. Directions for future research are suggested, along with strategies for overcoming challenges inherent in this multidisciplinary area of research. Implications for work-site health interventions are discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1090198107306435

    View details for Web of Science ID 000266397000007

    View details for PubMedID 18006665

  • Content and Frequency of Writing on Diabetes Bulletin Boards: Does Race Make a Difference? JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH Case, S., Jernigan, V., Gardner, A., Ritter, P., Heaney, C. A., Lorig, K. R. 2009; 11 (2)

    Abstract

    Diabetes-related disparities are well documented among racial minority groups in the United States. Online programs hold great potential for reducing these disparities. However, little is known about how people of different races utilize and communicate in such groups. This type of research is necessary to ensure that online programs respond to the needs of diverse populations.This exploratory study investigated message frequency and content on bulletin boards by race in the Internet Diabetes Self-Management Program (IDSMP). Two questions were asked: (1) Do participants of different races utilize bulletin boards with different frequency? (2) Do message, content, and communication style differ by race? If so, how?Subjects were drawn by purposeful sampling from participants in an ongoing study of the effectiveness of the IDSMP. All subjects had completed a 6-week intervention that included the opportunity to use four diabetes-specific bulletin boards. The sample (N = 45) consisted of three groups of 15 participants, each who self-identified as American Indian or Alaskan Native (AI/AN), African American (AA), or Caucasian, and was stratified by gender, age, and education. Utilization was assessed by counting the number of messages per participant and the range of days of participation. Messages were coded blindly for message type, content, and communication style. Data were analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics.In assessing board utilization, AAs wrote fewer overall messages (P = .02) and AIs/ANs wrote fewer action planning posts (P = .05) compared with Caucasians. AIs/ANs logged in to the program for a shorter time period than Caucasians (P = .04). For message content, there were no statistical (P

    View details for DOI 10.2196/jmir.1153

    View details for Web of Science ID 000274632700006

    View details for PubMedID 19632975

  • Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study With African American Women HEALTH EDUCATION & BEHAVIOR Harley, A. E., Buckworth, J., Katz, M. L., Willis, S. K., Odoms-Young, A., Heaney, C. A. 2009; 36 (1): 97-112

    Abstract

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has not been realized. By clearly elucidating the process of physical activity adoption and maintenance, effective programming could be implemented to reduce African American women's burden from chronic conditions. In-depth interviews were conducted with physically active African American women. Grounded theory, a rigorous qualitative research method used to develop theoretical explanation of human behavior grounded in data collected from those exhibiting that behavior, was used to guide the data collection and analysis process. Data derived inductively from the interviews and focus groups guided the development of a behavioral framework explaining the process of physical activity evolution.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/1090198107306434

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262950200008

    View details for PubMedID 18006664

  • African American Social and Cultural Contexts and Physical Activity: Strategies for Navigating Challenges to Participation WOMEN & HEALTH Harley, A. E., Odoms-Young, A., Beard, B., Katz, M. L., Heaney, C. A. 2009; 49 (1): 84-100

    Abstract

    We examined the influence of social and cultural contexts on participation in recommended levels of physical activity (PA) among African American women using a grounded theory approach. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and focus groups with 15 physically active African American women. Participants described social and cultural factors that served as challenges for participation in PA. Of particular importance, participants discussed their strategies for overcoming these challenges to initiate and maintain an active lifestyle. Strategies emerged to address three main areas: lack of PA exposure, PA norms and beliefs, and hair maintenance. Understanding contextually appropriate strategies to assist African American women in long-term PA maintenance will help inform effective health promotion efforts to reduce the burden of sedentary lifestyle and chronic disease in this community of women.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/03630240802690861

    View details for Web of Science ID 000264823600006

    View details for PubMedID 19485236

  • Differential associations of social support and social connectedness with structural features of social networks and the health status of older adults JOURNAL OF AGING AND HEALTH Ashida, S., Heaney, C. A. 2008; 20 (7): 872-893

    Abstract

    This study explores the extent to which the constructs of social support and social connectedness differ in terms of their associations with the structural characteristics of social networks and the health status of older adults.Trained interviewers conducted 126 face-to-face interviews with community-dwelling older adults aged 65 to 85 years.Having frequent contact with network members was positively associated with social support. Network density and having network members living in close proximity were positively associated with perceived social connectedness. Furthermore, perceived social connectedness had a significant positive association with health status, whereas social support did not.Perceived social connectedness may be relatively more important to the health and well-being of older adults than the perceived availability of social support. Efforts to enhance older adults' social relationships can be focused on developing friends and companions, allowing them to feel socially engaged in society.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0898264308324626

    View details for Web of Science ID 000259737000007

    View details for PubMedID 18815414

  • Intervention effectiveness evaluation criteria: Promoting competitions and raising the bar JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY Scharf, T., Chapman, L., Collins, J., Limanowski, J., Heaney, C., Goldenhar, L. M. 2008; 13 (1): 1-9

    Abstract

    The Intervention Evaluation Competition at the Work, Stress, and Health conference in Miami (March 2006) highlighted the importance of intervention evaluation studies that promote safety and health at work. A retitled, "Best Practices Evaluation Competition," has been included in the March, 2008, Work, Stress, and Health conference, in Washington, DC. This brief note describes the development of the criteria used to evaluate the manuscripts. The criteria are discussed with respect to (a) improving the science of evaluation methodology, (b) promoting the highest ethical standards in intervention evaluation, and (c) using the current criteria as a starting point for continuing to raise the bar for evaluation methodology. The policy implications of the evaluation criteria are discussed as well.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/1076-8998.13.1.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252615700001

    View details for PubMedID 18211164

  • Computer use, symptoms, and quality of life OPTOMETRY AND VISION SCIENCE Hayes, J. R., Sheedy, J. E., Stelmack, J. A., Heaney, C. A. 2007; 84 (8): 738-744

    Abstract

    To model the effects of computer use on reported visual and physical symptoms and to measure the effects upon quality of life measures.A survey of 1000 university employees (70.5% adjusted response rate) assessed visual and physical symptoms, job, physical and mental demands, ability to control/influence work, amount of work at a computer, computer work environment, relations with others at work, life and job satisfaction, and quality of life. Data were analyzed to determine whether self-reported eye symptoms are associated with perceived quality of life. The study also explored the factors that are associated with eye symptoms. Structural equation modeling and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the hypotheses.Seventy percent of the employees used some form of vision correction during computer use, 2.9% used glasses specifically prescribed for computer use, and 8% had had refractive surgery. Employees spent an average of 6 h per day at the computer. In a multiple regression framework, the latent variable eye symptoms was significantly associated with a composite quality of life variable (p = 0.02) after adjusting for job quality, job satisfaction, supervisor relations, co-worker relations, mental and physical load of the job, and job demand. Age and gender were not significantly associated with symptoms. After adjusting for age, gender, ergonomics, hours at the computer, and exercise, eye symptoms were significantly associated with physical symptoms (p < 0.001) accounting for 48% of the variance.Environmental variability at work was associated with eye symptoms and eye symptoms demonstrated a significant impact on quality of life and physical symptoms.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000249000200012

    View details for PubMedID 17700327

  • Protecting young workers in agriculture: participation in tractor certification training. Journal of agricultural safety and health Heaney, C. A., Wilkins, J. R., Dellinger, W., McGonigle, H., Elliott, M., Bean, T. L., Jepsen, S. D. 2006; 12 (3): 181-190

    Abstract

    Tractor-related injuries among youth are an important public health problem. The major objectives of this study were to (1) provide a rigorous estimate of the number of youth operating tractors in Ohio and (2) assess the extent to which these youth are participating in federally mandated tractor safety training. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by approximately 4,000 students ages 14 or 15 years who were enrolled in a stratified cluster sample of 99 Ohio schools. Almost one-third of the youth (30%) reported having operated tractors, with 19% having operated a tractor on a farm not owned by a parent or guardian. More than half of the youth (52%) reported having operated a tractor and/or other hazardous machinery, with 25% having operated the machinery on a farm not owned or operated by a parent or guardian. Extrapolating from 4-H records and Ohio census data, fewer than 1% of the youth who are operating tractors or other hazardous machinery have participated in tractor certification training. Increasing participation in mandated training may be an important step in protecting the health of our nation's young agricultural workers.

    View details for PubMedID 16981442

  • The effect of ergonomic interventions in healthcare facilities on musculoskeletal disorders AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE Fujishiro, K., Weaver, J. L., Heaney, C. A., Hamrick, C. A., Marras, W. S. 2005; 48 (5): 338-347

    Abstract

    The high incidence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among healthcare workers suggests that the introduction of ergonomic interventions could be beneficial. While laboratory studies have clearly documented the efficacy of ergonomic devices, few studies have examined their effectiveness in the healthcare workplace.This study evaluated a statewide program that provided ergonomic consultation and financial support for purchasing ergonomic devices, which aid in patient handling and lifting. Changes in MSD rates between baseline (1 year pre-intervention) and post-intervention (up to 2 years) periods were examined in 100 work units in 86 healthcare facilities.The median MSD rate decreased from 12.32 to 6.64 per 200,000 employee-hours, a decrease greater than the secular trend for the study period (1999-2003).This study suggests that ergonomic consultation and financial support for purchasing ergonomic equipment can be an effective intervention to reduce MSDs among healthcare workers.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/ajim.20225

    View details for Web of Science ID 000233125200003

    View details for PubMedID 16254947

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