School of Medicine


Showing 1-39 of 39 Results

  • Steven Adelsheim

    Steven Adelsheim

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Steven Adelsheim, MD is a child/adolescent and adult psychiatrist who works to support community behavioral health partnerships locally, regionally, at the state level and nationally. He is the Director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Adelsheim has partnered in developing statewide mental health policy and systems, including those focused on school mental health, telebehavioral health, tribal behavioral health programs, and suicide prevention. For many years Dr. Adelsheim has been developing and implementing early detection/intervention programs for young people in school-based and primary care settings, including programs for depression, anxiety, prodromal symptoms of psychosis, and first episodes of psychosis. Dr. Adelsheim is also involved in the implementation of integrated behavioral health care models in primary care settings as well as the use of media to decrease stigma surrounding mental health issues. He is currently leading the US effort to implement the headspace model of mental health early intervention for young people ages 12-25 based in Australia. Dr. Adelsheim also leads the national clinical network for early psychosis programs called PEPPNET.

  • Rania Awaad

    Rania Awaad

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests As the Director of the Muslims and Mental Health Lab, Dr. Awaad is dedicated to creating an academic home for the study of mental health as it relates to the Islamic faith and Muslim populations. The lab aims to provide the intellectual resources to clinicians, researchers, trainees, educators, community and religious leaders working with or studying Muslims.

  • Catherine Benedict

    Catherine Benedict

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on improving cancer survivorship through better understanding of long-term health outcomes and through the development of theoretically driven, evidence-based behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, risk management, and quality of life. To this end, I lead studies aimed to guide and support patient decision-making and self-management after cancer. Much of my work focuses on the experiences of young adults affected by cancer.

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Bio Dr. Bernert is Founding Director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chairs a special departmental initiative to develop a Center for Premature Mortality and Suicide Prevention. She is a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in suicide prevention clinical trials, standardized suicide risk assessment and best practice management, and the epidemiology of self-directed violence. She has subspecialty training in behavioral sleep medicine, with a background in sleep and circadian physiology. Her program utilizes cognitive, biologic (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics. Dr. Bernert has collaborated with NIH, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, and CDC on suicide prevention initiatives; and recently served as a content expert for the White House 2015 Open Data and Innovation for Suicide Prevention #Hackathon. She has also contributed to the development of clinical practice parameters, including the 2013 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Suicide Risk, with current work underway focused on investigating medical education training in suicide risk assessment and management. Her research focuses on the identification of novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention across the lifespan, particularly those aiming to reduce stigma and enhance access to care. A specific focus of this work emphasizes the use of rapid-action, low-risk treatment approaches for the prevention of suicide. Dr. Bernert has several suicide prevention trials underway, funded by NIH and DOD, testing the preliminary efficacy of a non pharmacological insomnia treatment on suicidal behaviors. She also has several grants focused on the development of a data monitoring system for the study of local suicide clusters and emergency department based protocols to improve risk detection within pediatric suicide prevention. Our aim is to delineate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers of clinical response that may inform the pathogenesis of risk and treatment innovation. An overarching mission is to harness new technologies within suicide prevention, including artificial intelligence (AI) and mobile health applications, to enhance risk detection and multidisciplinary frameworks. Advisory and advocacy work, and the way in which research guides health policy, dissemination, and national strategies for suicide prevention, represents an extension of this work. This includes recent initiatives to establish national and local guidelines for lethal means restriction and calls for advanced technology use in suicide prevention research and strategy. Last, Dr. Bernert has several pilot projects underway focused on inclusive practices in faculty diversity and development, and the way in which family-friendly policies impact faculty recruitment and retention in academic medicine.

  • Christiane Brems

    Christiane Brems

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Christiane Brems, PhD, ABPP, RYT-500, C-IAYT, received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Oklahoma State University in 1987. Dr. Brems is licensed as a psychologist in several US states and board-certified as a clinical psychologist by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). She is a registered yoga teacher (E-RYT500) and certified C-IAYT yoga therapist. She is also certified in Interactive Guided Imagery.

    She began her career in academia at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. She then served on faculty at the University of Alaska Anchorage for 23 years, where she held a variety of leadership positions, including as (Co-Founding) Director of the Center for Behavioral Health Research and Services, (Co-Founding) Director of the PhD Program in Clinical-Community Psychology, and Interim Vice Provost for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. Most recently, she served for nearly six years as Dean and Professor of the School of Graduate Psychology (SGP) at Pacific University Oregon.

    Dr. Brems has worked for decades as an applied researcher and clinical practitioner with particular interests in health promotion, rural healthcare delivery, and all things yoga. Her work has been funded by grants and contracts from the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Dis. Control and Prevention, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, and local and State of Alaska funding sources. She has shared her work extensively in over 120 peer-reviewed journal articles, 100s of technical reports, and several books, including the Comprehensive Guide to Child Psychotherapy (now in its 4th edition), Dealing with Challenges in Psychotherapy and Counseling, Basic Skills in Counseling and Psychotherapy, and others. Dr. Brems is committed to excellence in and integration of clinical services, teaching, consultation, and research.

    Dr. Brems has integrated yoga, mindfulness, complementary interventions, and self-care strategies in her work as a consultant, author, dean, teacher, researcher, mentor, supervisor, colleague, and service provider. She values these practices as crucial aspects of day-to-day professional and personal life and seeks to enhance access to them for all who can benefit.

  • Eve Carlson

    Eve Carlson

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Eve Carlson is a clinical psychologist and a senior researcher with the Dissemination and Training Division of the National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, located in the Palo Alto VA Health Care System. She collaborates with faculty in the departments of Surgery (David Spain) and Medicine (Lisa Shieh) to study risk screening and preventive care for psychological disorder after sudden, severe illness or injury. Her current research is funded by an R01 grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. The primary aim is to develop a measure of risk for mental health problems following sudden, severe illness or injury that is accurate for all patients, including ethnic and racial minorities.

  • Timothy Durazzo

    Timothy Durazzo

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The mission of the Durazzo BRASS lab is to better understand how the interplay between biomedical, psychological and social factors influences treatment outcome in Veterans and civilians seeking treatment for alcohol and substance use disorders. To accomplish this mission, our multidisciplinary team integrates information from advanced neuroimaging, neurocognitive assessment, psychodiagnostic and genotyping methods to identify the biopsychosocial factors associated with relapse and sustained sobriety. Veteran's Administration and Stanford funded Clinical trials are currently being conducted by the BRASS lab that evaluate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques as novel complementary treatments to reduce the high rate of relapse experienced by individuals with alcohol and substance abuse disorders. The ultimate goal of our multidisciplinary research program is to promote the development of more effective biomedical and behavioral treatments for alcohol and substance use disorders through consideration of the brain biology, psychology and social circumstances of each individual.

  • Cheryl Gore-Felton, Ph.D.

    Cheryl Gore-Felton, Ph.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My clinical focus is the treatment of anxiety disorders, including post traumatic stress disorder. My research focuses on developing effective psychotherapy interventions to reduce chronic stress as well as enhance positive health behaviors to reduce morbidity and mortality among patients coping with chronic, medical illnesses which are often life threatening.

  • Heather Jo Gotham

    Heather Jo Gotham

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Heather J. Gotham is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and member of the Center for Behavioral Health Services and Implementation Research in the Division of Public Mental Health & Population Sciences.

    She is the Director of the Network Coordinating Office of the Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC) Network funded by SAMHSA. The MHTTC Network consists of 10 regional centers, a National American Indian & Alaska Native Center, and a National Hispanic & Latino Center. The overarching goal of this network is the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based mental health prevention, treatment, and recovery support practices across US states and territories. She is also a consultant on two National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) funded projects studying the implementation of substance use disorder screening and treatment approaches in HIV care settings.

    Dr. Gotham has served as principal investigator, co-investigator or evaluator on SAMHSA, NIH, HRSA, and CDC grants. Her research focuses on implementation science, including factors affecting implementation, training and education of health care providers, and longitudinal course of implementation. Topics include substance use and mental health treatments for adolescents and adults, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, and screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT).

    Dr. Gotham assisted in the development of the Dual Diagnosis Capability in Addiction Treatment (DDCAT) index with Mark McGovern, and led the development of the Dual Diagnosis Capability in Mental Health Treatment (DDCMHT) index. She co-authored practice guidelines for co-occurring disorders treatment in the State of Missouri, and led the evaluation for Missouri’s COSIG (Co-occurring State Infrastructure Grant) grant as well as another foundation-funded multi-site co-occurring disorders initiative. She has served on several national and state-level expert panels, and provided training and technical assistance on co-occurring disorders at the national, state, and local levels.

    Paired with her work in assisting providers to implement clinical protocols, Dr. Gotham has significant experience in clinical teaching and training behavioral health and health care students and professionals. This work includes serving as the supervisor of a clinical research rotation in an APA-approved psychology internship, and designing curricula and providing training and technical assistance to behavioral health and health professionals on treatments for adult and adolescent substance use disorders (including opioid use disorder), implementing EBPs into behavioral health settings, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders and treatment, integrating behavioral and primary health, and SBIRT. Dr. Gotham led two SAMHSA-funded SBIRT health professions training grants, developing didactic, role play, standardized patient scenarios, and training vignettes for SBIRT, and teaching medical students and residents; baccalaureate and advanced practice nursing, dental, dental hygiene, master’s level social work, and clinical psychology PhD students; medical, dental, nursing, and behavioral health faculty; clinical preceptors; and community healthcare providers. She also has experience developing interactive online training.

  • Kate Hardy

    Kate Hardy

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kate Hardy is a California Licensed Psychologist who has specialized in working with individuals with psychosis for over 15 years in both research and clinical settings. Dr. Hardy received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom. She has worked in specialist early psychosis services in both the UK and the US, including UCSF’s Prodrome Assessment Research and Treatment (PART) program, where she completed her post-doctoral fellowship, and as Clinical Director for the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program. Dr. Hardy has significant experience in providing CBTp to individuals with early psychosis, and those at risk of developing psychosis, in both individual and group settings and integration of this clinical intervention to broader systems and staff teams. She has led multiple trainings and workshops in CBTp to a wide variety of audiences including community clinicians, psychiatrists, and families, and provides ongoing supervision and consultation in this approach. Dr. Hardy is also involved in the implementation of national strategies to increase dissemination of early psychosis models with the aim of bringing these cutting edge treatments to a broader population.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Humphreys researches interventions for substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), developing health services research-related applications for innovative qualitative and quantitative research techniques, and analyzing national mental health policy.

  • Debra Lee Kaysen

    Debra Lee Kaysen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health & Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Debra Kaysen received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Missouri. She completed an internship at the University of Washington and continued there to complete an NIAAA-funded F32 to study the area of overlap between PTSD and alcohol use disorders. Dr. Kaysen joined the faculty at University of Washington in 2006 in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. While there she founded a program to develop and test more accessible interventions for individuals suffering from mental health symptoms following traumatic events. Dr. Kaysen joined the Stanford faculty in 2019.

    Dr. Kaysen’s area of specialty both in research and clinical work is in treatment for those who have experienced traumatic events including treatment of PTSD and related disorders. She has conducted critical studies on treatment of PTSD and/or substance use across a variety of populations (sexual minority women, Native Americans, sexual assault survivors, torture survivors, active duty military) and in a variety of settings (the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, primary care, rural settings). Other research conducted by Dr. Kaysen has focused on increasing our understanding of how PTSD and substance use may influence each other. Dr. Kaysen is currently the President of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (www.istss.org). Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the Department of Defense, PCORI, and USAID.

    Dr. Kaysen is currently involved in helping develop and implement coping strategies for healthcare workers dealing with mental health concerns related to COVID-19. Dr. Kaysen's clinical work has been featured on This American Life (https://www.thisamericanlife.org/682/ten-sessions).

  • Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Corey Keller, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching goal of my research is to identify and apply individualized stimulation protocols to elicit precise and predictable long-term plasticity in order to alleviate psychiatric suffering. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was FDA approved for treatment-resistant depression over 10 years ago as a circuit-based, targeted intervention that complements traditional psychiatric treatments. Remission rates, however, remain at 15% at worst and 40% at best. TMS trials using identical treatment settings are currently underway for bipolar disorder, PTSD, OCD, and addiction. The low efficacy and one-size-fits-all treatment (with respect to timing, site, and intensity) stems from our lack of understanding of how TMS induces brain changes. It is reasonable to expect that we can improve the efficacy of TMS. By selecting the optimal parameters based on the stimulation timing, location, intensity, and duration of the TMS pulses, we can customize treatment to maximize an individual’s clinical response. My 10 year research aims are to obtain this level of specificity and treatment response by:

    1) Developing an integrated translational clinical research program.
    2) Identifying the specific neural mechanisms underlying repetitive stimulation-induced plasticity.
    3) Creating novel treatments with TMS based on experimentally-driven computational models of plasticity.

    This three-pronged approach has the expected outcome of producing novel stimulation treatments with enhanced specificity, plasticity, and efficacy. By increasing our understanding of the underlying mechanism and monitoring of brain changes during TMS, we will markedly increase the utility of these powerful techniques. Together, this work will help transform interventional psychiatry from an isolated (from a clinic perspective), one-size-fits-all treatment approach to one that focuses on targeting objective biomarkers and that is collaborative, large-scale, and automated, pushing the field into the age of personalized neuromodulation.

  • Matthew Kendra

    Matthew Kendra

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stigma, help-seeking, access to mental health services, and substance use

  • Christina Khan

    Christina Khan

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Christina Khan is a child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist. She specializes in the treatment of trauma, depression, anxiety, gender and sexuality issues, and physician wellness. Dr. Khan has a special interest in treating vulnerable and under-resourced populations in the United States and abroad.

  • Jane P. Kim

    Jane P. Kim

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the application of statistical methods to improve public mental health. My areas of expertise are the robustness of regression-based inference in randomized or non-randomized studies, methods for analyzing survival data subject to non-standard sampling schemes, and spatial statistics.

  • Steven Lindley

    Steven Lindley

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veteran's Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Maximizing the use of evidence-based practices and reducing unnecessary medical burden of psychiatric treatments for stress-related disorders.

  • LAWRENCE McGLYNN

    LAWRENCE McGLYNN

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Methamphetamine Abuse
    HIV Neuropsychiatry

  • Mark McGovern

    Mark McGovern

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use innovations from implementation science to improve public access to effective treatments for all health problems and especially behavioral health problems, including addiction and mental health disorders. Our credo is NO HEALTH WITHOUT BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. Our goal is to enhance a person's chances for the best outcomes possible, including a lifetime of recovery. We embrace our leadership role to advance the science of implementation and mentor the next generation of researchers.

  • Ruth O'Hara

    Ruth O'Hara

    Director, Spectrum, Senior Associate Dean, Research and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. O'Hara's research aims to investigate how cognitive information processing deficits subserve affective symptoms in psychiatric disorders, and interact with key brain networks integral to these disorders. To do so, she has implemented a translational, interdisciplinary program that encompasses cellular models, brain and behavioral assays of affective and cognitive information processing systems in psychiatric disorders across the lifespan.

  • Maurice M. Ohayon

    Maurice M. Ohayon

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Main focus is epidemiology of sleep and psychiatric disorders in the general population and clinical settings: 1)sleep habits and patterns; 2) prevalence, diagnosis, co-morbidity, treatment and Public Health impact of sleep disorders; 3) pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, panic disorder and generalized anxiety; 4) epidemiology of narcolepsy and hypersomnia.

  • Oxana Palesh

    Oxana Palesh

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focused on developing interventions for management of side effects of cancer treatments (e.g., sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety).

  • Pablo Paredes Castro

    Pablo Paredes Castro

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests PRECISE, PERSONALIZED & AFFORDABLE WELLBEING TECHNOLOGY

    Combining medicine, design, and engineering principles, we research novel technologies to keep people healthy and productive. Our goal is to discover revolutionary ways of broadly delivering both universal and selective, preventive, and self-sustaining, daily life interventions.

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Dr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations’ International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford’s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Carolyn Rodriguez

    Carolyn Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    Bio Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez has developed methods that combine in vivo drug infusions with magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalograpy to map human brain circuit dysfunction in real time.

    As a psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and clinical researcher, Carolyn’s NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, non-invasive brain stimulation, and psychotherapy for OCD, PTSD, and hoarding disorder. Additional studies focus on understanding the basic neuroscience mechanisms of repetitive behaviors. Carolyn also provides mental health care for Veterans as a consultation-liaison psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs.

    Carolyn serves as Associate Chair for Inclusion and Diversity in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford, Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, Vice Chair for the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, and Co-Chair of the International OCD Foundation Research Symposium. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects at the early stages of their careers and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos, and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public.

    Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

  • Craig S. Rosen

    Craig S. Rosen

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research aims at improving processes and outcomes of mental health care for veterans other people suffering from post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders.

    My primary focus is improving access to evidence-based treatments PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. My second emphasis is using telemedicine technologies to expand access to effective care. My third interest is measurement-based care, using ongoing data on patient progress to inform patients' and clinicians' decisions.

  • Eric Stice

    Eric Stice

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Stice served as an assistant professor and associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin and as a Senior Research Scientist at Oregon Research Institute before joining the faculty at Stanford University. His research focuses on identifying risk factors that predict onset of eating disorders, obesity, substance abuse, and depression to advance knowledge regarding etiologic processes, including the use of functional neural imaging. He also designs, evaluates, and disseminates prevention and treatment interventions for eating disorders, obesity, and depression. For instance, he developed a dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program that has been implemented with over 4 million young girls in 139 countries. He has published 297 articles in high-impact outlets, including Science, Psychological Bulletin, Archives of General Biological Psychiatry, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and Journal of Neuroscience.

  • Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Dolores Gallagher Thompson, PhD, ABPP

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My current research focuses on use of technology to improve mental health of older persons and their family members. I have a strong interest in how cultural diversity impacts mental health access, services, and outcomes. I am currently involved in several international research and demonstration projects in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the health care system in Thailand as well as projects in the US - notably, with rural caregivers and those of Asian American ancestry.

  • Jared R Tinklenberg

    Jared R Tinklenberg

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Psychopharmacology of dementia and Alzheimer's disease;, biological correlates of Alzheimer's disease; sexual dysfunction in, Alzheimer's disease; memory disorders.

  • Ranak Trivedi

    Ranak Trivedi

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Enhancing the role of informal caregivers in chronic disease self-management; assessment and treatment of mental illness in primary care settings; psychosocial antecedents and consequences of cardiovascular disease.

  • Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Nina Vasan, MD, MBA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mental illness is the greatest thief of human potential today. By harnessing the power of medicine, entrepreneurship, and technology, we can return that potential to the 2 billion people suffering around the world.

    Brainstorm is the world's first academic laboratory dedicated to transforming mental health through innovation and entrepreneurship.

  • Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Shannon Wiltsey Stirman

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overarching goal of my program of research is to determine how to facilitate the high quality delivery of evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPs) in public sector mental health settings. Areas of emphasis include training and consultation, treatment fidelity and adaptation, and the identification of strategies that promote sustained implementation of EBPs. .

  • Jerome Yesavage

    Jerome Yesavage

    Jared and Mae Tinklenberg Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study cognitive processes and aging in our research center. Studies range from molecular biology to neuropsychology of cognitive processes.

  • Kei Yoshimatsu

    Kei Yoshimatsu

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Kei Yoshimatsu, MD, is an adjunct clinical faculty member within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. His clinical interests include community and public psychiatry, homeless mental health, as well as LGBTQ mental health. He has completed his residency and fellowship at University of California, San Francisco.

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