School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 53 Results

  • Ralph Rabkin

    Ralph Rabkin

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr Rabkin is examining the mechanism of the acquired resistance to hormones that develops in kidney failure.In particular he is studying the impact of kidney failure on the action of growth hormone and the role of impaired signal transduction as a cause of growth hormone resistance. He is also engaged in the study of growth factors in diabetic kidney disease.

  • Thomas Raffin

    Thomas Raffin

    The Colleen and Robert Haas Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Raffin is a clinician, teacher and investigator. He retired as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in 2004. His key areas of academic interest include the biology and management of acute lung injury; basic biology of human lung and white cells; and, key issues in biomedical ethics including withholding and withdrawing life support, health care delivery, genomics, genetic screening, and neuroethics.

  • Rishi Raj

    Rishi Raj

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Rishi Raj is an Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and directs the Interstitial Lung Disease program at Stanford. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases and has practiced pulmonary and critical care medicine for more than 15 years. Dr. Raj's primary clinical interest and primary focus of clinical research is interstitial lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, other idiopathic interstitial lung diseases, drug induced interstitial lung diseases, interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis etc., sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other miscellaneous interstitial lung diseases. Dr. Raj is the principal investigator and co-investigator on multiple clinical trials evaluating new therapies for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis/interstitial lung disease from other etiologies.

  • Kavitha Ramchandran

    Kavitha Ramchandran

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on innovative models of care delivey to understand how to integrate primary and specialist palliative care. We also do work in palliative care education and how to scale our education to be impactful and sustainable. We are evaluating online models.

    In cancer care I do research on novel therapeutics in thoracic malignancies including immunotherapy, new targeted agents, and new sequencing of approved drugs.

  • Meghan Ramsey

    Meghan Ramsey

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    Bio Dr. Meghan Ramsey is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania with a major in Neuroscience. She then attended Stanford University for medical school where she stayed to complete her internal medicine residency, and pulmonary/critical care fellowship. Her clinical time is split between the inpatient setting in the medical ICU and the ambulatory setting in Interventional Pulmonology with a focus on thoracic malignancies. Outside of her clinical time she has a dedicated commitment to teaching, serving as a mentor for residents and fellows, as well as leading as a co-director the pulmonary physiology course for medical students. Additionally, she has a focus on quality improvement serving as the Pulmonary division quality director.

  • Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Bio Risheen Reejhsinghani obtained her medical degree in Mumbai, India, followed by an internal medicine residency at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston, MA and cardiology fellowship at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, where she served as one of the chief fellows. She subsequently completed an advanced echocardiography fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in echocardiography, general cardiology, and nuclear cardiology.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani practices as a general cardiologist in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as the Associate Director for the hospital-based Consultative Cardiology Service. As a clinical cardiologist, she believes strongly in the tenets of evidence-based practice, diagnostic cognizance, and patient education. She also has a specific interest in the burgeoning field of Cardio-Rheumatology, focused on cardiac diseases among patients with rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, among others. Her clinical research in this area has focused on the evaluation of structural cardiac disease and diastolic dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients, primarily using echocardiography.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani has a strong interest in medical education, and believes that instilling a love for bedside medicine and the physical exam is the soundest way to empower future generations of learners. To this end, she received additional training in clinical teaching and simulation at the University of California, San Francisco. She has worked extensively on curriculum design, including the co-development of a pilot echocardiography simulation training program for incoming cardiology fellows. She currently serves as the faculty Co-Lead/Associate Course Director for Quarter 3 in the Practice of Medicine Course for first year medical students at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Reejhsinghani also enjoys writing, particularly about medical education, and has written articles for national newspapers overseas, among other publications.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Bio I am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Jack S. Remington, M.D.

    Jack S. Remington, M.D.

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Studies on the diagnosis, epidemiology, clinical features and prevention of toxoplasmosis in the pregnant woman, the fetus and newborn, in eye disease and in the immunocompromised patient.

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • Jinnie J. Rhee

    Jinnie J. Rhee

    Instructor, Medicine - Nephrology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Pharmacoepidemiology of type 2 diabetes and diabetes complications
    Diabetes management in patients with chronic kidney disease
    Nutritional epidemiology of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
    Racial and ethnic health disparities in diabetes and diabetes-related outcomes
    Implementation science and clinical decision analysis
    Qualitative research and mixed methods research

  • June-Wha Rhee

    June-Wha Rhee

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    Bio Dr. Rhee is a general cardiologist with specialized clinical and research training in cardiovascular drug toxicity and pharmacogenomics. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship and internal medicine residency training at Stanford University School of Medicine. During her post-doctoral training, Dr. Rhee's research focused on elucidating cardiotoxic effects of iron overload and of multiple chemotherapeutic agents using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived models. Her current research employs clinical data, population genomics, and patient-derived iPSCs models to study genetic determinants and mechanisms of drug-induced cardiovascular toxicities. Dr. Rhee's clinic sees cardio-oncology patients and focuses on devising new methods for minimizing cardiovascular complications in that population.

Latest information on COVID-19