School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 18 Results

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • Donald Schreiber

    Donald Schreiber

    Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research group focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies including acute myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure. We have evaluated novel cardiac markers and point-of-care testing in clinical practice. Current projects also include the diagnosis and treatment of acute pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. Other interests include spinal cord injury, pneumonia and sepsis.

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • George Segall

    George Segall

    Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Scintigraphic evaluation of coronary blood flow and myocardial function using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Tumor imaging and characterization of pulmonary nodules with PET/CT.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) and of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Transplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Joseph Shrager

    Joseph Shrager

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests In clinical research, Dr. Shrager has been an innovator studying outcomes in a variety of areas within Thoracic Surgery including: parenchyma-sparing operations and minimally invasive resections for lung cancer, transcervical thymectomy for myasthenia gravis, and surgical treatment of emphysema.

    In the lab, Dr. Shrager is focused on the impact of disease states upon the diaphragm. His group published the seminal paper (NEJM) describing diaphragm atrophy assoc'd with mechanical ventilation.

  • Julia Simard

    Julia Simard

    Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Bio Julia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Assistant Professor of Health Research and Policy in the Epidemiology Division, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty as an Assistant Professor in 2013. Dr. Simard’ studies outcomes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, but has shifted much of her focus to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease. In 2014 she was awarded a five-year K career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. She is also interested in disentangling social and biological constructs in the reported disparities in SLE with respect to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity, both from the etiologic and outcomes perspectives.

  • Robert Simoni

    Robert Simoni

    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cholesterol in biological membranes; genetic mechanisms & cholesterol production