March 1 Mar 1
2021
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Monday Mon
PST via ZOOM

Updates Regarding COVID-19 Advisory:

Please note that all ADRC Speakers Series Lectures will be online until further notice.

ADRC Distinguished Speaker Series 2020-21

Guest Speaker: Bruce Miller, MD
“Neurodegenerative Disease 2030”

Bruce Miller, MD

Professor of Neurology
UCSF Director, Memory and Aging Center, ADRC
Co-Director, Global Brain Health Institute

Zoom meeting ID: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98245030908?pwd=Y0ZrWjhPQU40OTZKQmczNGVFR1grdz09

Please Note: This meeting requires a password, please contact Nusha Askari, PhD, askarin@stanford.edu to request the password for this online Zoom lecture.

The Pacific Udall Center and the Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center host an ongoing seminar series from 4-5 PM each month. Please join us for a gathering among physicians and scientists interested in learning more about mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases and in developing interventions. All interested faculty, trainees and staff are welcome to attend.

Guest Speaker

Bruce Miller, MD

Professor of Neurology
UCSF Director, Memory and Aging Center, ADRC
Co-Director, Global Brain Health Institute

Dr. Miller holds the A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professorship in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco where he directs the Memory and Aging Center. He is a behavioral neurologist whose work in neurodegenerative conditions emphasizes brain-behavior relationships and the genetic and molecular underpinnings of disease. He is the principal investigator of the NIH-sponsored Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and program project on frontotemporal dementia. Additionally, he helps lead the Tau Consortium, Bluefield Project to Cure Frontotemporal Dementia and Global Brain Health Institute. He was awarded the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology and elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

“I have pursued a deeper understanding of the brain and behavior relationship by combining detailed studies of the anatomical changes that correlate with changes in behavior. I have reported on the emergence of artistic ability, changes in sexual behaviors, new onset of criminal behavior, and changes in eating behavior. While some of these associations are important to making an accurate diagnosis, others are leading to a deeper understanding of brain functional anatomy and how that functional anatomy may impact disease risk. Associating changes in behavior with changes in the brain also helps to break down stigmas linked to aging and dementia.”

Some lectures are available via Zoom

Some faculty candidate lectures, conferences, and seminars are available via "Zoom". Zoom access is available to current Stanford University faculty, staff, students, or users with base or fully sponsored SUNet IDs. More information on Zoom please click here: Stanford Zoom. You may need to contact the moderator listed above for Zoom login and password information.