Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
June 10, 2019
Vol. 11, No. 11
E-cigarette use, flavorings may increase heart disease risk, study finds

E-cigarette use, flavorings may increase heart disease risk, study finds

E-cigarette flavorings damage human blood vessel cells grown in the lab even in the absence of nicotine, Stanford researchers and their colleagues found. Cinnamon and menthol flavors were particularly harmful.

 
 
Radiation-free stem cell transplants, gene therapy may be within reach
 

Radiation-free stem cell transplants, gene therapy may be within reach

Researchers at Stanford and the University of Tokyo may have cracked the code to doing stem cell transplants and gene therapy without radiation and chemotherapy.

 
Wildfire smoke worse for kids’ health than smoke from controlled burns
 

Wildfire smoke worse for kids’ health than smoke from controlled burns

Immune markers and pollutant levels in the blood indicate wildfire smoke may be more harmful to children’s health than smoke from a controlled burn, Stanford researchers found.

 
Surgeon performs Stanford Medicine’s first scar-free thyroid removal
 

Surgeon performs Stanford Medicine’s first scar-free thyroid removal

Ordinarily, surgery to remove part of a patient’s thyroid leaves a scar on the neck. But Stanford surgeon Dana Lin performed the procedure by going through the mouth.

 
Big data, from computer models to clinic, is focus of conference
 

Big data, from computer models to clinic, is focus of conference

Invisible sensors, machine learning for disease diagnoses, big data in the clinic and more took the stage as topics at this year’s Big Data in Precision Health Conference.

 
5 Questions: Alan Schatzberg urges cautious approach to ketamine use
 

5 Questions: Alan Schatzberg urges cautious approach to ketamine use

Physicians and patients are excited about ketamine, the latest drug to treat depression, but Stanford psychiatrist Alan Schatzberg says we need to tread carefully.

 
Collaboration aims to battle physician burnout
 

Collaboration aims to battle physician burnout

The California Medical Association and Stanford Medicine have launched a multimillion dollar project to reduce physician burnout by providing support to doctors statewide.

 
Spirit, Inspiring Change award winners announced

Spirit, Inspiring Change award winners announced

The recipients of the School of Medicine’s 2019 Spirit Award are Jackie Bautista and Kelly Adams. Bahij Austin and Loto Reed received the Inspiring Change Leadership Award.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Dan Eisenberg, Cori Poffenberger, Sherry Wren and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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