Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Jan. 16, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 1
50 years ago, Stanford heart doctors made history

50 years ago, Stanford heart doctors made history

On Jan. 6, 1968, as Stanford surgeon Norman Shumway performed the first U.S. adult heart transplantation, the world held its breath.

 
 
Drug blocks Zika, other mosquito-borne viruses in cell cultures
 

Drug blocks Zika, other mosquito-borne viruses in cell cultures

A new Stanford study details how to shut off proteins in mammalian cells to keep viruses such as Zika, dengue and West Nile from replicating in them.

 
Brain zap saps destructive urges
 

Brain zap saps destructive urges

A characteristic electrical-activity pattern in a key brain region predicts impulsive actions just before they occur. A brief electrical pulse at just the right time can prevent them, Stanford scientists have found.

 
New technique could reveal immunotherapy targets
 

New technique could reveal immunotherapy targets

Stanford scientists have developed a biochemical screen that identifies molecules critical to immunotherapy for a host of diseases, including cancer.

 
Use of chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer declines
 

Use of chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer declines

Chemotherapy use for early stage breast cancer declined from 2013 to 2015, possibly due to a preference for less toxic treatments, according to researchers at Stanford and the University of Michigan.

 
New treatments, screening methods dramatically reduce breast cancer deaths
 

New treatments, screening methods dramatically reduce breast cancer deaths

Six groups of researchers, including one from Stanford, collaborated to study the effect of advances in breast cancer screening and treatment on mortality rates.

 
Drug increases speed, safety of treatment for multiple food allergies
 

Drug increases speed, safety of treatment for multiple food allergies

Combining an antibody drug, omalizumab, with a procedure to desensitize children to multiple food allergies is safe and effective, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

 
New device selects healthy sperm
 

New device selects healthy sperm

A new sperm-sorting device built at Stanford filters the unfit from the fit and could help improve infertility treatments.

 
Neuroscientist Ben Barres, who identified crucial role of glial cells, dies at 63

Neuroscientist Ben Barres, who identified crucial role of glial cells, dies at 63

The Stanford neuroscientist’s research focused on the cells in the brain that aren’t nerve cells. Collectively called glia, these “other” cells play a central role in sculpting and maintaining the brain’s wiring diagram.

 
Innovator, imaging expert Juergen Willmann dies at 45

Innovator, imaging expert Juergen Willmann dies at 45

Juergen Willmann, an international scholar, dedicated himself to advancing cancer detection imaging technologies and leading with energy and compassion.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Euan Ashley, Manisha Desai and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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