Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Jan. 23, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 2
Researchers identify source of opioids’ side effects

Researchers identify source of opioids’ side effects

Stanford researchers said they have identified the receptors to which opioids bind to produce tolerance to the drugs and increased sensitivity to pain. They also found that a commercially available drug limited those side effects in mice.

 
 
Caffeine may counter age-related inflammation
 

Caffeine may counter age-related inflammation

A chronic inflammatory process that occurs in some, but not all, older people may trigger cardiovascular problems, a new Stanford study shows. Part of the solution might be found in a cup of coffee.

 
Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick
 

Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick

New research from Stanford shows that fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when an individual’s heart rate, skin temperature and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness.

 
Diabetes impairs activity of bone stem cells in mice, inhibits fracture repair
 

Diabetes impairs activity of bone stem cells in mice, inhibits fracture repair

Stanford researchers found that activating bone stem cells helps repair fractures in diabetic mice. Applying a protein to the fracture site increased the expression of key signaling proteins and enhanced healing in the animals.

 
Toxic brain cells may drive many neurodegenerative disorders
 

Toxic brain cells may drive many neurodegenerative disorders

Astrocytes, star-shaped cells in the central nervous system, are essential to the survival and healthy function of brain neurons. But aberrant astrocytes may be driving neurodegenerative disorders.

 
Technique reveals movements of immune cells as they hunt for tumors
 

Technique reveals movements of immune cells as they hunt for tumors

In the culmination of a 10-year-long effort, researchers have demonstrated the first visualization of human immune cells as they track down brain tumor cells in living patients.

 
Bodywide immune response important for fighting cancer
 

Bodywide immune response important for fighting cancer

Effective anti-tumor activity requires a systemic, rather than only a local, immune response at the tumor site. A Stanford study may help clinicians pinpoint why only some cancer patients respond to immunotherapies.

 
Where homosexuality is a crime, gay health workers face tough choices

Where homosexuality is a crime, gay health workers face tough choices

Being gay and working in global health presents a unique set of issues, as many countries treat homosexuality as a crime, punishable by prison or death.

 
Leslee Subak appointed new chair of obstetrics and gynecology

Leslee Subak appointed new chair of obstetrics and gynecology

Subak, who earned her medical degree at Stanford, is an expert in urogynecology, particularly in researching and treating urinary incontinence in women.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Kay Chang, Elizabeth Mormino, Wen-Kai Weng and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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